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Is there an easy way to test whether your named pipe is working correctly? I want to make sure that the data I'm sending from my app is actually being sent. Is there a quick and easy way to get a list of all the named pipes?

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6 Answers 6

up vote 40 down vote accepted

You can view these with Process Explorer from sysinternals. Use the "Find -> Find Handle or DLL..." option and enter the pattern "\Device\NamedPipe\". It will show you which processes have which pipes open.

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Check which version of Process Explorer you have before you try this. It does not work on v15.23, but works on v16.02. (haven't tried other versions) –  Carl Jul 6 '14 at 21:56
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To avoid possible exceptions - as it is mentioned in other answers - you can use my solution which is more low level but working like a charm even if named pipe's name contains invalid characters in way of name of file. Please see stackoverflow.com/questions/25109491/… –  user2126375 Aug 4 '14 at 20:26

Try the following instead:

String[] listOfPipes = System.IO.Directory.GetFiles(@"\\.\pipe\");
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your missing a slash. string[] listOfPipes = System.IO.Directory.GetFiles(@"\\.\pipe\"); –  dmex Nov 25 '10 at 23:15
    
You... Absolutley ROCK! –  NTDLS Jul 7 '11 at 20:20
    
I spent all night looking for a function to search for or list pipes. This is exactly what I needed. Thanks!! –  swax Apr 23 '12 at 3:31

Use pipelist.exe from Sysinternals.

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See also handle.exe from sysinternals which will show almost all things that have an open handle. –  JimR Jan 3 '11 at 22:55
    

I'll supplement the existing entries with the Powershell syntax.

In the Windows Powershell console, type

[System.IO.Directory]::GetFiles("\\.\\pipe\\")


If you are running Powershell Version 3 or higher (not the Windows 7 default version), you can also type

get-childitem \\.\pipe\
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You may want to consider opening Powershell as an administrator –  dotNetE Aug 27 '13 at 22:57
    
You can also use get-childitem \\.\pipe\ –  Chris Gillum Jan 22 at 22:15
    
@ChrisGillum I tried that, and got an error "Cannot find path '\\.\pipe\' because it does not exist" –  Andrew Shepherd Jan 22 at 23:50
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@AndrewShepherd Interesting. What OS are you running on? It works for me on Windows Server 2012 and Windows 10 (PowerShell v3 and v5 respectively). –  Chris Gillum Jan 23 at 1:10
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@ChrisGillum But I just tried it on my Windows Surface RT device. It works there. (Powershell v4). I'll incorporate your comment into the answer. –  Andrew Shepherd Jan 23 at 1:46

C#:

String[] listOfPipes = System.IO.Directory.GetFiles(@"\\.\pipe\");
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You... Absolutley ROCK! –  NTDLS Jul 7 '11 at 20:20

The second pipe was interpreted by this web site when submitted... You need two backslashes at the beginning. So make sure to use System.IO.Directory.GetFiles(@"\\.\pipe\").

Note that I have seen this function call throw an 'illegal characters in path.' exception when one of the pipes on my machine had invalid characters. PipleList.exe worked ok though, so it seems like a bug in MS's .net code.

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The note about 'illegal characters in path' is an important point, because it is very common for programs to open pipe names that trigger this. Any program that opens a pipe named like C:\myLocation\someFile.x will cause this error. –  dss539 Jul 30 '13 at 14:13

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