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Making a generic property

I'm not quite sure how to do that, but what I would like to do is to create a special type of property that will perform specific tasks at the get and set, and will be defined on generic type. For example, when writing this:

MyProp<String> name;

a pre-defined get and set will be performed on the string value.

How can that be done?

Thanks!

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marked as duplicate by nawfal, Bridge, Aleksander Blomskøld, CloudyMarble, M42 Feb 1 '13 at 13:10

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3  
I'm not sure I understand the question. –  Amy Apr 6 '10 at 18:16
1  
why do you need generics for this? can you post an example of what you actually want to do, and why you want to do it on various types? –  Dave Apr 6 '10 at 18:17
    
I also don't understand. Would MyProp<string> name { get { return DoCustomGet(); } { set { DoCustomSet(value); } } not work? –  Jaxidian Apr 6 '10 at 18:18
1  
It is called "template specialization" in C++. Not available in .NET generics. –  Hans Passant Apr 6 '10 at 18:48
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6 Answers

up vote 28 down vote accepted

You can make a generic class like this:

public class MyProp<T>
{
    private T _value;

    public T Value
    {
        get
        {
            // insert desired logic here
            return _value;
        }
        set
        {
            // insert desired logic here
            _value = value;
        }
    }

    public static implicit operator T(MyProp<T> value)
    {
        return value.Value;
    }

    public static implicit operator MyProp<T>(T value)
    {
        return new MyProp<T> { Value = value };
    }
}

...then use it in a class like so:

class SomeClass
{
    public MyProp<int> SomeProperty { get; set; }
}

The implicit operators means that you do not need to explicitly set or get the Value property of MyProp, but can write code to access the value in a more "natural" way:

SomeClass instance = new SomeClass();
instance.SomeProperty = 32;
int someInt = instance.SomeProperty;
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I think this is missing to take "..to create a special type of property that will perform specific tasks at the get and set.." into account - but since this question is really unclear I might be wrong. –  Benjamin Podszun Apr 6 '10 at 18:38
    
@Benjamin: yes, the question is a bit unclear, but that is where the insert desired logic here comments come into the picture in my code sample. You could put in some logic that will be performed whenever the getter or setter is invoked, regardless of which property it is done for. –  Fredrik Mörk Apr 6 '10 at 18:43
    
Whoa, I completely missed to see the whole picture. I'm really no friend of implicit operators, but - I guess you answered the question just fine. +1. –  Benjamin Podszun Apr 6 '10 at 18:54
    
Yep, this is exactly what I was looking for. Thanks! –  rachmos Apr 6 '10 at 19:15
1  
+1 for writing out what I had described. –  John Fisher Apr 6 '10 at 20:10
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Okay, I'll bite. You want something like this: If you declare a "property" like this:

Update: I'm now pretty sure that Fredrik Mörk answered your question and gave a solution. I'm not really happy with the idea, but it seems to answer exactly what I understood from your question.

public class PropertyFoo {
  public MyProp<String> Name;
}

this ends up as

public class PropertyFoo {
  public string Name {
    get { /* do predefined stuff here */ }
    set { /*other predefined stuff here */ }
  }
}

No. Not possible and not a property, really. Look for template/snippet support in your IDE.

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+1 the most logical conclusion. –  leppie Apr 6 '10 at 18:28
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You would need to create a generic class named MyProp. Then, you will need to add implicit or explicit cast operators so you can get and set the value as if it were the type specified in the generic type parameter. These cast operators can do the extra work that you need.

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would not work I think with only the cast operators, one also would need the assignment operator which is not overloadable... –  Tim Mahy Apr 6 '10 at 18:20
    
@Tim: Cast operators go both ways. When assigning a string to a MyProp<string>, if there is an implicit cast operator, it would get used. –  John Fisher Apr 6 '10 at 19:55
    
yes but a developer would still be able to set the property with a MyProp<string> value without having it being intercepted.... –  Tim Mahy Apr 7 '10 at 6:55
    
@Tim: Sure, but that's not the usage model he wanted. Using it in the expected, straightforward, simple, normal way would not have this issue. –  John Fisher Apr 7 '10 at 14:39
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You just declare the property the normal way using a generic type:

public MyType<string> PropertyName { get; set; }

If you want to call predefined methods to do something in the get or set, implement the property getter/setter to call those methods.

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You can also declare properties with unbound generic types, which makes things more fun: public MyType<T> PropertyName { get; set; }. If you implement the getter/setter, the type of the value will be T and will vary with how it is used. –  dthorpe Apr 6 '10 at 18:24
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You cannot 'alter' the property syntax this way. What you can do is this:

class Foo
{
    string MyProperty { get; set; }  // auto-property with inaccessible backing field
}

and a generic version would look like this:

class Foo<T>
{
    T MyProperty { get; set; }
}
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public class MyProp<T>
{
...
}

public class ClassThatUsesMyProp
{
public MyProp<String> SomeProperty { get; set; }
}
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