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I have some struct:

struct A
{
 const char* name_;
 A* left_;
 A* right_;
 A(const char* name):name_(name),
      left_(nullptr),
      right_(nullptr){}
 A(const A&);
 //A(const A*);//ToDo
 A& operator=(const A&);
 ~A()
 {
  /*ToDo*/
 };
};
/*Just to compile*/
A& A::operator=(const A& pattern)
{

 //check for self-assignment
 if (this != &pattern) 
 {
  void* p = new char[sizeof(A)];
 }
 return *this;
}

A::A(const A& pat)
{
 void* p = new char[sizeof(A)];
 A* tmp = new (p) A("tmp");
 tmp->~A();
 delete tmp;//I WONDER IF HERE I SHOULD USE DIFFERENT delete[]?
}

int _tmain(int argc, _TCHAR* argv[])
{
 A a("a");
 A b = a;
 cin.get();
 return 0;
}

I know this is far from ideal and far from finished. But I would like to know if I'm deleting my memory in the proper way (please don't tell me how to do it properly. I'm trying to figure it out myself).

This is the link to different question which is really important to me.

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Can a struct even have constructors and a destructor? –  John Apr 6 '10 at 19:43
    
@John: Why not? –  KennyTM Apr 6 '10 at 19:44
5  
@John: A struct and class are the same thing. The only difference is struct's are public by default, in both member visibility and inheritance. –  GManNickG Apr 6 '10 at 19:44
    
Ahh -- C++ struct != C struct. Thanks. –  John Apr 6 '10 at 19:45
1  
What's this for? If for exercise, only practice one thing at a time. From the looks of it, you're making a tree of strings. Either work on a tree class and use std::string, or use std::set and work on a string class. There's 0 reason to do everything by hand. In real code, you'd use both std::set and std::string and not waste time. If you're restricted for some reason, make a string class and make a tree class, your string worries about being a string, and your tree worries about being a tree. Neither should do more than one thing: one responsibility per class. –  GManNickG Apr 6 '10 at 20:02

5 Answers 5

up vote 4 down vote accepted
void* p = new char[sizeof(A)];
A* tmp = new (p) A("tmp");
tmp->~A();
delete tmp;//I WONDER IF HERE I SHOULD USE DIFFERENT delete[]?

No. You have already called the destructor so it is not correct to call delete which will cause another destructor call. You only need to free the memory. e.g.

delete[] static_cast<char*>(p);

If you are allocating raw memory for use with placement new it is more conventional to directly use an allocation function. e.g.

void* p = ::operator new[](sizeof(A));
A* tmp = new (p) A("tmp");
tmp->~A();
::operator delete[](p);

Consider doing something simpler, though. This block could be replaced with a single local variable which would be more robust.

A tmp("tmp");
share|improve this answer
1  
Since new[] invokes ::operator new[](size_t) you should use ::operator delete[](void*). –  Kirill V. Lyadvinsky Apr 6 '10 at 19:45
    
@Kirill: Oh yes, thanks. –  Charles Bailey Apr 6 '10 at 19:46
1  
@Kirill: Is this even guaranteed? Surely since p was allocated with new[], the only truly defined way to deallocate it would be delete[] p (after casting back to char*). For example, the compiler might use operator new[] with new[], but with a greater size (for whatever reason) and return an offsetted pointer. Then calling operator delete[] results in undefined behavior. I don't suspect that ever happens in practice, though, but if the above is allowed then it won't be defined to use operator delete[] on a pointer with a value from new[]. –  GManNickG Apr 6 '10 at 19:51
    
@GMan: Good point, editing (again!). –  Charles Bailey Apr 6 '10 at 19:59
1  
@Charles: Ah, of course. Thanks. @atch: You're correct, if you use placement new, you should explicitly call the destructor when you're done. The four-lined code block in this answer is the correct way. (Fun fact: The standard doesn't require you actually call the destructor on a placed-new object, even if the destructor is non-trivial; you can complete omit it. Obviously, this isn't very helpful to classes expecting to do cleanup in the destructor, so do it anyway. :P) –  GManNickG Apr 6 '10 at 20:23

If you allocate the memory with p = new[…], then you should deallocate with delete[] p[1], no exceptions.

Don't mess with tmp after it's dead.

(Placement new doesn't allocate memory, the destructor won't modify the new char[sizeof(A)], so they don't enter to the question.)

[1]: You should declare p as a char*. Or cast p to a char* in delete[].

share|improve this answer
1  
But delete[] tmp would be wrong in this case. I think this needs more explanation. The lifetime of the array of char s ends once their storage is reused for the A object. –  Charles Bailey Apr 6 '10 at 19:44
    
@Charles: I disagree. If tmp is allocated via malloc, then I shouldn't call free? If tmp is allocated via alloca then the stack will explode? The underlying allocation mechanism should be independent of the construction/deconstruction which doesn't affect allocation/deallocation. –  KennyTM Apr 6 '10 at 19:49
    
Yes, but when you say "use delete[] " you don't explicitly say what to delete[]. Both delete[] tmp and delete[] a would cause undefined behaviour. You have to explicitly cast one of the pointers to be correct: e.g delete[] static_cast<char*>(p) . –  Charles Bailey Apr 6 '10 at 19:54
    
@Charles: I see. I've updated the answer to clarify that. –  KennyTM Apr 6 '10 at 19:58

If you are allocating memory for a pointer in the class, the destructor should deallocate (delete) the memory also:

class Node
{
  char * name_;
  Node * p_left;
  Node * p_right;

  Node(const char * new_name)
  : name_(NULL), p_left(NULL), p_right(NULL)
  {
    size_t size = strlen(new_name);
    name_ = new char [size + 1]; // + 1 for terminating null
  }
  ~Node()
  {
     delete[] name_;
  }
};

I highly suggest:

  1. Using std::string instead of char * for text.
  2. Move the links into a base class (preference is to use template for the data section of the Node.}

The base class will allow you to adapt the node to different data types:

struct Node
{
    Node * p_left;
    Node * p_right;
};

struct Name_Node
: public Node
{
  std::string name;
};

struct Integer_Node
: public Node
{
  int value;
};

OTOH, you may want to use std::map or std::list after this exercise.

share|improve this answer

To allocate memory for instance of A just write A* p = new A("tmp");. It will allocate memory and invoke constructor. Then use delete p; to invoke destructor and to deallocate memory. I can't see any need for using placement form of new in your case.

share|improve this answer
A::A(const A& pat)
{
 void* p = new char[sizeof(A)];
 A* tmp = new (p) A("tmp");
 tmp->~A();
 delete tmp;//I WONDER IF HERE I SHOULD USE DIFFERENT delete[]?
}

Yes, you should use delete[], since you created the memory with new[]. Furthermore, before you reach the constructor (in this case a copy constructor) the memory has already been allocated, so there's no need to allocate it again, which is what it appears you are trying to do here.

When you delete an object, the destructor (~A in this case) is called automatically, so there is no need to explicitly call it, unless you are using a placement new. So there is no need in the delete to explicitly remove the memory allocated for the object itself, only for the members that it owns.

The copy constructor should simply copy the important information out of the thing being copied. Last, the code here takes a string: A a("a");, so you'll need a string constructor to be able to make that call:

A::A(const std::string& name)
{
   //Do stuff
}
share|improve this answer
    
I've read somewhere that if you create object with placement new you should call it's destructor manually. It was in one of the books by... can't remember his name now, he works for Microsoft now, he wrote books from c++ in depth series. –  There is nothing we can do Apr 6 '10 at 20:01
    
I sit corrected. parashift.com/c++-faq-lite/dtors.html However, placement new still seems an odd choice here. –  Joel Apr 6 '10 at 20:14

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