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I'm looking for an algorithm to find bounding box (max/min points) of a closed quadratic bezier curve in Cartesian axis:

input: C (a closed bezier curve)
output: A B C D points

Image

Note: above image shows a smooth curve. it could be not smooth. (have corners)

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edit that into your question please –  Femaref Apr 6 '10 at 19:55
    
If you know the quadratic equation can you not calculate y values for each x value, noting the lowest and highest y value for the range of x values? –  James Westgate Apr 6 '10 at 20:08
    
@ James Westgate : Hmm... it could be difficult to calculate, or even to convert bezier equation to form of y=f(x) for every curve. I'm writing python code to accomplish. so i want an algorithm not a solution. –  sorush-r Apr 6 '10 at 20:17
    
@JamesWestgate: If I understand what you mean, then you're only sampling the curve, and your chances of finding the exact bounds are minimal, and their is also a chance of being way off. That would be like trying to find the min of a parabola by checking the y-value for every integer value of x. In reality, you need to "sample" the curve at infinitesimal distances, which is why calculus was invented =). The nice thing about Beziers is that you don't need to find the derivative it's given to you as a set of parametric equations. –  sh1ftst0rm Apr 9 '13 at 17:13

5 Answers 5

up vote 5 down vote accepted

Well, I would say you start by adding all endpoints to your bounding box. Then, you go through all the bezier elements. I assume the formula in question is this one:

Quadratic Bezier from Wikipedia

From this extract two formulas for X, and Y respectively. Test both for extrema by taking the derivative (zero crossings). Then add the corresponding points to your bounding box as well.

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@ypnos: Thanks. how could i do test of extrema with a programming language? i think this needs a CAS and I don't have one! could introduce free one for python please? –  sorush-r Apr 6 '10 at 20:20
1  
It's easier to calculate the points where the derivative is zero directly as t0=(P1-P0)/(P0-2P1+P2). –  tom10 Apr 6 '10 at 20:39
    
Well the extrema test in your case is a rather simple formula and the number of solutions is known beforehand. So you will perhaps need one or two if statements, but the rest is just calculation. I don't do Python, sorry. –  ypnos Apr 6 '10 at 20:41

Use De Casteljau algorithm to approximate the curve of higher orders. Here is how it works for cubic curve http://jsfiddle.net/4VCVX/3/

function getCurveBounds(ax, ay, bx, by, cx, cy, dx, dy)
{
        var px, py, qx, qy, rx, ry, sx, sy, tx, ty,
            tobx, toby, tocx, tocy, todx, tody, toqx, toqy, 
            torx, tory, totx, toty;
        var x, y, minx, miny, maxx, maxy;

        minx = miny = Number.POSITIVE_INFINITY;
        maxx = maxy = Number.NEGATIVE_INFINITY;

        tobx = bx - ax;  toby = by - ay;  // directions
        tocx = cx - bx;  tocy = cy - by;
        todx = dx - cx;  tody = dy - cy;
        step = 1/40;    // precission
        for(var i=0; i<41; i++)
        {
            var d = i*step;
            px = ax +d*tobx;  py = ay +d*toby;
            qx = bx +d*tocx;  qy = by +d*tocy;
            rx = cx +d*todx;  ry = cy +d*tody;
            toqx = qx - px;      toqy = qy - py;
            torx = rx - qx;      tory = ry - qy;

            sx = px +d*toqx;  sy = py +d*toqy;
            tx = qx +d*torx;  ty = qy +d*tory;
            totx = tx - sx;   toty = ty - sy;

            x = sx + d*totx;  y = sy + d*toty;                
            minx = Math.min(minx, x); miny = Math.min(miny, y);
            maxx = Math.max(maxx, x); maxy = Math.max(maxy, y);
        }        
        return {x:minx, y:miny, width:maxx-minx, height:maxy-miny};
}
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Ivan Kuckir's DeCasteljau is a brute force, but works in many cases. The problem with it is the count of iterations. The actual shape and the distance between coordinates affect to the precision of the result. And to find a precise enough answer, you have to iterate tens of times, may be more. And it may fail if there are sharp turns in curve.

Better solution is to find first derivative roots, as is described on the excellent site http://processingjs.nihongoresources.com/bezierinfo/. Please read the section Finding the extremities of the curves.

The link above has the algorithm for both quadratic and cubic curves.

The asker of question is interested in quadratic curves, so the rest of this answer may be irrelevant, because I provide codes for calculating extremities of Cubic curves.

Below are three Javascript codes of which the first (CODE 1) is the one I suggest to use.


** CODE 1 **

After testing processingjs and Raphael's solutions I find they had some restrictions and/or bugs. Then more search and found Bonsai and it's bounding box function, which is based on NISHIO Hirokazu's Python script. Both have a downside where double equality is tested using ==. When I changed these to numerically robust comparisons, then script succeeds 100% right in all cases. I tested the script with thousands of random paths and also with all collinear cases and all succeeded:

Various cubic curves

Random cubic curves

Collinear cubic curves

The code is as follows. Usually left, right, top and bottom values are the all needed, but in some cases it's fine to know the coordinates of local extreme points and corresponding t values. So I added there two variables: tvalues and points. Remove code regarding them and you have fast and stable bounding box calculation function.

// Source: http://blog.hackers-cafe.net/2009/06/how-to-calculate-bezier-curves-bounding.html
// Original version: NISHIO Hirokazu
// Modifications: Timo

var pow = Math.pow,
  sqrt = Math.sqrt,
  min = Math.min,
  max = Math.max;
  abs = Math.abs;

function getBoundsOfCurve(x0, y0, x1, y1, x2, y2, x3, y3)
{
  var tvalues = new Array();
  var bounds = [new Array(), new Array()];
  var points = new Array();

  var a, b, c, t, t1, t2, b2ac, sqrtb2ac;
  for (var i = 0; i < 2; ++i)
  {
    if (i == 0)
    {
      b = 6 * x0 - 12 * x1 + 6 * x2;
      a = -3 * x0 + 9 * x1 - 9 * x2 + 3 * x3;
      c = 3 * x1 - 3 * x0;
    }
    else
    {
      b = 6 * y0 - 12 * y1 + 6 * y2;
      a = -3 * y0 + 9 * y1 - 9 * y2 + 3 * y3;
      c = 3 * y1 - 3 * y0;
    }

    if (abs(a) < 1e-12) // Numerical robustness
    {
      if (abs(b) < 1e-12) // Numerical robustness
      {
        continue;
      }
      t = -c / b;
      if (0 < t && t < 1)
      {
        tvalues.push(t);
      }
      continue;
    }
    b2ac = b * b - 4 * c * a;
    sqrtb2ac = sqrt(b2ac);
    if (b2ac < 0)
    {
      continue;
    }
    t1 = (-b + sqrtb2ac) / (2 * a);
    if (0 < t1 && t1 < 1)
    {
      tvalues.push(t1);
    }
    t2 = (-b - sqrtb2ac) / (2 * a);
    if (0 < t2 && t2 < 1)
    {
      tvalues.push(t2);
    }
  }

  var x, y, j = tvalues.length,
    jlen = j,
    mt;
  while (j--)
  {
    t = tvalues[j];
    mt = 1 - t;
    x = (mt * mt * mt * x0) + (3 * mt * mt * t * x1) + (3 * mt * t * t * x2) + (t * t * t * x3);
    bounds[0][j] = x;

    y = (mt * mt * mt * y0) + (3 * mt * mt * t * y1) + (3 * mt * t * t * y2) + (t * t * t * y3);
    bounds[1][j] = y;
    points[j] = {
      X: x,
      Y: y
    };
  }

  tvalues[jlen] = 0;
  tvalues[jlen + 1] = 1;
  points[jlen] = {
    X: x0,
    Y: y0
  };
  points[jlen + 1] = {
    X: x3,
    Y: y3
  };
  bounds[0][jlen] = x0;
  bounds[1][jlen] = y0;
  bounds[0][jlen + 1] = x3;
  bounds[1][jlen + 1] = y3;
  tvalues.length = bounds[0].length = bounds[1].length = points.length = jlen + 2;

  return {
    left: min.apply(null, bounds[0]),
    top: min.apply(null, bounds[1]),
    right: max.apply(null, bounds[0]),
    bottom: max.apply(null, bounds[1]),
    points: points, // local extremes
    tvalues: tvalues // t values of local extremes
  };
};

// Usage:
var bounds = getBoundsOfCurve(532,333,117,305,28,93,265,42);
console.log(JSON.stringify(bounds));
// Prints: {"left":135.77684049079755,"top":42,"right":532,"bottom":333,"points":[{"X":135.77684049079755,"Y":144.86387466397255},{"X":532,"Y":333},{"X":265,"Y":42}],"tvalues":[0.6365030674846626,0,1]} 

CODE 2 (which fails in collinear cases):

I translated the code from http://processingjs.nihongoresources.com/bezierinfo/sketchsource.php?sketch=tightBoundsCubicBezier to Javascript. The code works fine in normal cases, but not in collinear cases where all points lie on the same line.

For reference, here is the Javascript code.

function computeCubicBaseValue(a,b,c,d,t) {
    var mt = 1-t;
    return mt*mt*mt*a + 3*mt*mt*t*b + 3*mt*t*t*c + t*t*t*d; 
}

function computeCubicFirstDerivativeRoots(a,b,c,d) {
    var ret = [-1,-1];
  var tl = -a+2*b-c;
  var tr = -Math.sqrt(-a*(c-d) + b*b - b*(c+d) +c*c);
  var dn = -a+3*b-3*c+d;
    if(dn!=0) { ret[0] = (tl+tr)/dn; ret[1] = (tl-tr)/dn; }
    return ret; 
}

function computeCubicBoundingBox(xa,ya,xb,yb,xc,yc,xd,yd)
{
    // find the zero point for x and y in the derivatives
  var minx = 9999;
  var maxx = -9999;
    if(xa<minx) { minx=xa; }
    if(xa>maxx) { maxx=xa; }
    if(xd<minx) { minx=xd; }
    if(xd>maxx) { maxx=xd; }
    var ts = computeCubicFirstDerivativeRoots(xa, xb, xc, xd);
    for(var i=0; i<ts.length;i++) {
      var t = ts[i];
        if(t>=0 && t<=1) {
          var x = computeCubicBaseValue(t, xa, xb, xc, xd);
          var y = computeCubicBaseValue(t, ya, yb, yc, yd);
            if(x<minx) { minx=x; }
            if(x>maxx) { maxx=x; }}}

  var miny = 9999;
  var maxy = -9999;
    if(ya<miny) { miny=ya; }
    if(ya>maxy) { maxy=ya; }
    if(yd<miny) { miny=yd; }
    if(yd>maxy) { maxy=yd; }
    ts = computeCubicFirstDerivativeRoots(ya, yb, yc, yd);
    for(i=0; i<ts.length;i++) {
      var t = ts[i];
        if(t>=0 && t<=1) {
          var x = computeCubicBaseValue(t, xa, xb, xc, xd);
          var y = computeCubicBaseValue(t, ya, yb, yc, yd);
            if(y<miny) { miny=y; }
            if(y>maxy) { maxy=y; }}}

    // bounding box corner coordinates
    var bbox = [minx,miny, maxx,miny, maxx,maxy, minx,maxy ];
    return bbox;
}

CODE 3 (works in most cases):

To handle also collinear cases, I found Raphael's solution, which is based on the same first derivative method as the CODE 2. I added also a return value dots, which has the extrema points, because always it's not enough to know bounding boxes min and max coordinates, but we want to know the exact extrema coordinates.

EDIT: found another bug. Fails eg. in 532,333,117,305,28,93,265,42 and also many other cases.

The code is here:

Array.max = function( array ){
  return Math.max.apply( Math, array );
};
Array.min = function( array ){
  return Math.min.apply( Math, array );
};

var findDotAtSegment = function (p1x, p1y, c1x, c1y, c2x, c2y, p2x, p2y, t) {
        var t1 = 1 - t;
        return {
            x: t1*t1*t1*p1x + t1*t1*3*t*c1x + t1*3*t*t * c2x + t*t*t * p2x,
            y: t1*t1*t1*p1y + t1*t1*3*t*c1y + t1*3*t*t * c2y + t*t*t * p2y
        };
};
var cubicBBox = function (p1x, p1y, c1x, c1y, c2x, c2y, p2x, p2y) {
        var a = (c2x - 2 * c1x + p1x) - (p2x - 2 * c2x + c1x),
            b = 2 * (c1x - p1x) - 2 * (c2x - c1x),
            c = p1x - c1x,
            t1 = (-b + Math.sqrt(b * b - 4 * a * c)) / 2 / a,
            t2 = (-b - Math.sqrt(b * b - 4 * a * c)) / 2 / a,
            y = [p1y, p2y],
            x = [p1x, p2x],
            dot, dots=[];
        Math.abs(t1) > "1e12" && (t1 = 0.5);
        Math.abs(t2) > "1e12" && (t2 = 0.5);
        if (t1 >= 0 && t1 <= 1) {
            dot = findDotAtSegment(p1x, p1y, c1x, c1y, c2x, c2y, p2x, p2y, t1);
            x.push(dot.x);
            y.push(dot.y);
            dots.push({X:dot.x, Y:dot.y});
        }
        if (t2 >= 0 && t2 <= 1) {
            dot = findDotAtSegment(p1x, p1y, c1x, c1y, c2x, c2y, p2x, p2y, t2);
            x.push(dot.x);
            y.push(dot.y);
            dots.push({X:dot.x, Y:dot.y});
        }
        a = (c2y - 2 * c1y + p1y) - (p2y - 2 * c2y + c1y);
        b = 2 * (c1y - p1y) - 2 * (c2y - c1y);
        c = p1y - c1y;
        t1 = (-b + Math.sqrt(b * b - 4 * a * c)) / 2 / a;
        t2 = (-b - Math.sqrt(b * b - 4 * a * c)) / 2 / a;
        Math.abs(t1) > "1e12" && (t1 = 0.5);
        Math.abs(t2) > "1e12" && (t2 = 0.5);
        if (t1 >= 0 && t1 <= 1) {
            dot = findDotAtSegment(p1x, p1y, c1x, c1y, c2x, c2y, p2x, p2y, t1);
            x.push(dot.x);
            y.push(dot.y);
            dots.push({X:dot.x, Y:dot.y});
        }
        if (t2 >= 0 && t2 <= 1) {
            dot = findDotAtSegment(p1x, p1y, c1x, c1y, c2x, c2y, p2x, p2y, t2);
            x.push(dot.x);
            y.push(dot.y);
            dots.push({X:dot.x, Y:dot.y});
        }
        // remove duplicate dots
                var dots2 = [];
                var l = dots.length;
                for(var i=0; i<l; i++) {
                  for(var j=i+1; j<l; j++) {
                    if (dots[i].X === dots[j].X && dots[i].Y === dots[j].Y)
                      j = ++i;
                  }
                  dots2.push({X: dots[i].X, Y: dots[i].Y});
                }
        return {
        min: {x: Array.min(x), y: Array.min(y)},
        max: {x: Array.max(x), y: Array.max(y)},
        dots: dots2 // these are the extrema points
      };
    };
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If you move that if (b2ac < 0) check one line up, you prevent attempting to take a square root of a negative number. This doesn't hurt in JS, but makes porting easier. –  Sebastian Aug 25 at 20:16

I believe that the control points of a Bezier curve form a convex hull that encloses the curve. If you just want a axis-aligned bounding box, I think you need to find the min and max of each (x, y) for each control point of all the segments.

I suppose that might not be a tight box. That is, the box might be slightly larger than it needs to be, but it's simple and fast to compute. I guess it depends on your requirements.

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Yes it is true that the control points enclose the curve. –  ypnos Apr 6 '10 at 21:36
    
@Adrian McCarthy: Thanks for answer. but I need to find a rectangle with minimum area. –  sorush-r Apr 7 '10 at 7:03
    
The curve can be outside the bounds of the control points. –  drawnonward Apr 14 '10 at 10:43
2  
@drawnonward: [Wikipedia says][1]: "the curve is completely contained in the convex hull of its control points" [1]: en.wikipedia.org/wiki/B%C3%A9zier_curve –  Adrian McCarthy Apr 14 '10 at 13:00
    
"The curve can be outside the bounds of the control points" is true, if we consider only the off curve control points. If also start and end point are considered as control points, then the sentence is not true. –  Timo Jan 20 '13 at 22:00

I think the accepted answer is fine, but just wanted to offer a little more explanation for anyone else trying to do this.

Consider a quadratic Bezier with starting point p1, ending point p2 and "control point" pc. This curve has three parametric equations:

  1. pa(t) = p1 + t(pc-p1)
  2. pb(t) = pc + t(p2-pc)
  3. p(t) = pa(t) + t*(pb(t) - pa(t))

In all cases, t runs from 0 to 1, inclusive.

The first two are linear, defining line segments from p1 to pc and from pc to p2, respectively. The third is quadratic once you substitute in the expressions for pa(t) and pb(t); this is the one that actually defines points on the curve.

Actually, each of these equations is a pair of equations, one for the horizontal dimension, and one for the vertical. The nice thing about parametric curves is that the x and y can be handled independently of one another. The equations are exactly the same, just substitute x or y for p in the above equations.

The important point is that the line segment defined in equation 3, that runs from pa(t) to pb(t) for a specific value of t is tangent to the curve at the corresponding point p(t). To find the local extrema of the curve, you need to find the parameter value where the tangent is flat (i.e., a critical point). For the vertical dimension, you want to find the value of t such that ya(t) = yb(t), which gives the tangent a slope of 0. For the horizontal dimension, find t such that xa(t) = xb(t), which gives the tangent an infinite slope (i.e., a vertical line). In each case, you can just plug the value of t back into equation 1 (or 2, or even 3) to get the location of that extrema.

In other words, to find the vertical extrema of the curve, take just the y-component of equations 1 and 2, set them equal to each other and solve for t; plug this back into the y-component of equation 1, to get the y-value of that extrema. To get the complete y-range of the curve, find the minimum of this extreme y value and the y-components of the two end points, and likewise find the maximum of all three. Repeat for x to get the horizontal limits.

Remember that t only runs in [0, 1], so if you get a value outside of this range, it means there is no local extrema on the curve (at least not between your two endpoints). This includes the case where you end up dividing by zero when solving for t, which you will probably need to check for before you do it.

The same idea can be applied to higher-order Beziers, there are just more equations of higher degree, which also means there are potentially more local extrema per curve. For instance, on a cubic Bezier (two control points), solving for t to find the local extrema is a quadratic equation, so you could get 0, 1, or 2 values (remember to check for 0-denominators, and for negative square-roots, both of which indicate that there are no local extrema for that dimension). To find the range, you just need to find the min/max of all the local extrema, and the two end points.

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