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In Clojure, I want to combine two lists to give a list of pairs,

> (zip '(1 2 3) '(4 5 6))  
((1 4) (2 5) (3 6))

In Haskell or Ruby the function is called zip. Implementing it is not difficult, but I wanted to make sure I wasn't missing a function in Core or Contrib.

There is a zip namespace in Core, but it is described as providing access to the Zipper functional technique, which does not appear to be what I am after.

Is there an equivalent function for combining 2 or more lists, in this way, in Core?

If there is not, is it because there is an idiomatic approach that renders the function unneeded?

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Thanks for the question, I will use this as an example at my Clojure Example of the Day Twitter account: twitter.com/cleotd –  Michiel Borkent Apr 7 '10 at 17:44
    
@MichielBorkent twitter.com/cleotd is not the Clojure Example of the Day twitter account... –  Mark Jun 27 '12 at 8:01
1  
Right, I renamed it to twitter.com/learnclojure later on but can't edit comments after certain amount of time. –  Michiel Borkent Jun 27 '12 at 10:12

6 Answers 6

up vote 90 down vote accepted
(map vector '(1 2 3) '(4 5 6))

does what you want:

=> ([1 4] [2 5] [3 6])

Haskell needs a collection of zipWith (zipWith3, zipWith4, ...) functions, because they all need to be of a specific type; in particular, the number of input lists they accept needs to be fixed. (The zip, zip2, zip3, ... family can be regarded as a specialisation of the zipWith family for the common use case of tupling).

In contrast, Clojure and other Lisps have good support for variable arity functions; map is one of them and can be used for "tupling" in a manner similar to Haskell's

zipWith (\x y -> (x, y))

The idiomatic way to build a "tuple" in Clojure is to construct a short vector, as displayed above.

(Just for completeness, note that Haskell with some basic extensions does allow variable arity functions; using them requires a good understanding of the language, though, and the vanilla Haskell 98 probably doesn't support them at all, thus fixed arity functions are preferrable for the standard library.)

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That is exactly what I was after. Cheers. –  John Kane Apr 6 '10 at 21:27
    
Wow, that was a great explanation. Exactly what I was looking for as well, thanks! –  Nick Knowlson Feb 5 '13 at 20:26
    
Note that this behaves differently than zip when the collections are not the same length. Ruby will continue processing and supply nils for the shorter collection, whereas Clojure will stop processing once one of the collections is exhausted. –  Nate W. Jun 17 at 18:45
    
@NateW. That is good to note, thanks. In Haskell zip behaves like Clojure's map in this respect. –  Michał Marczyk Jun 17 at 21:30
(map vector [1 2 3] [4 5 6])
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Whoops, Michał already answered this. –  danlei Apr 6 '10 at 21:25

to give you exactly what you wanted, mapping list across the two lists will give you a list of lists like in your example. I think that many Clojurians would tend to use vectors for this though it will work with anything. and the inputs do not need to be the same type. map creates seqs from them and then maps the seqs so any seq'able input will work fine.

(map list '(1 2 3) '(4 5 6))
(map list  [1 2 3] '(4 5 6))
(map hash-map  '(1 2 3) '(4 5 6))
(map hash-set  '(1 2 3) '(4 5 6))
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I think you mean hash-map and hash-set instead of map and set. –  cgrand Apr 7 '10 at 7:29
    
thanks for pointing that out :) fixed. –  Arthur Ulfeldt Apr 7 '10 at 21:19
(partition 2 (interleave '(1 2 3) '(4 5 6))) 
=> ((1 4) (2 5) (3 6))

or more generally

(defn zip [& colls]
  (partition (count colls) (apply interleave colls)))

(zip '( 1 2 3) '(4 5 6))           ;=> ((1 4) (2 5) (3 6))

(zip '( 1 2 3) '(4 5 6) '(2 4 8))  ;=> ((1 4 2) (2 5 4) (3 6 8))
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The built-in way would simply be the function 'interleave':

(interleave [1 2 3 4] [5 6 7 8]) => [1 5 2 6 3 7 4 8]
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2  
to achieve the goal of the OP you should add (partition 2 (interleave [1 2 3 4][5 6 7 8])) –  skuro Aug 15 '12 at 16:35
    
yes - It appears I didn't look at the OP's desired output too closely. –  lsh Oct 5 '12 at 14:20

#(apply map list %) transposes a matrix just like the Python zip* function. As a macro definition:

user=> (defmacro py-zip [lst] `(apply map list ~lst))

#'user/py-zip

user=> (py-zip '((1 2 3 4) (9 9 9 9) (5 6 7 8)))

((1 9 5) (2 9 6) (3 9 7) (4 9 8))

user=> (py-zip '((1 9 5) (2 9 6) (3 9 7) (4 9 8)))

((1 2 3 4) (9 9 9 9) (5 6 7 8))

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