Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I can't understand this result...

The code:

void foo(void * key, size_t key_sz) {
    HashItem *item = malloc(sizeof(HashItem));

    printf("[%d]\n", (int)key);

    ...

    item->key = malloc(key_sz);
    memcpy(item->key, key, key_sz);
}

void bar(int num) {
    foo(&num, sizeof(int));
}

And I do this call: bar(900011009);

But the printf() output is:

[-1074593956]

I really need key to be a void pointer, how can I fix this?

share|improve this question

2 Answers 2

up vote 3 down vote accepted

I think you need this:

printf("[%d]\n", *(int*)key); 

The key is a void pointer to the int, so you first need to cast to an int pointer, then dereference to get the original int.

share|improve this answer
    
Yeah, I tried (int*)*key but didn't work and *(int*)key never occurred to me. –  Ricardo Amaral Apr 7 '10 at 1:22

If you cast the pointer to int, you are getting the address as the value. You need to dereference void pointers like any other. Only you cannot directly dereference void *, so you must first cast it to a pointer of the correct type, here int *. Then dereference that pointer, i.e. *((int *)key) (extra parentheses to clarify the precedence).

share|improve this answer
    
Yeah, I tried (int*)*key but didn't work and *(int*)key never occurred to me. –  Ricardo Amaral Apr 7 '10 at 1:22

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.