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I have the following JSON text that I need to parse to get pageName, pagePic, post_id, etc.

What is the required code?

{
   "pageInfo": {
         "pageName": "abc",
         "pagePic": "http://example.com/content.jpg"
    }
    "posts": [
         {
              "post_id": "123456789012_123456789012",
              "actor_id": "1234567890",
              "picOfPersonWhoPosted": "http://example.com/photo.jpg",
              "nameOfPersonWhoPosted": "Jane Doe",
              "message": "Sounds cool. Can't wait to see it!",
              "likesCount": "2",
              "comments": [],
              "timeOfPost": "1234567890"
         }
    ]
}
share|improve this question
    
    
java's built in JSON libraries are the quickets way to do so, but in my experience GSON is the best library for parsing a JSON into a POJO painlessly. – BLACKVVINE Mar 9 at 11:11
1  
This question really was too broad and "write the code for me" which leads to a mess of confusing and differing answers below. This question should have been closed for being too broad and the author making no effort to solve it themselves, showing no homework. – Jayson Minard May 18 at 12:57
    
There are many notorious java libraries in java: jackson, gson, org.json, genson, etc. Choosing one should take into account their relative performance and feature set. Here is a benchmark did using JMH that compares the performance of the most popular json libraries in java: github.com/fabienrenaud/java-json-benchmark. See my post below for some more info. – fabien Jun 27 at 20:35

21 Answers 21

The org.json library is easy to use. Example code below:

import org.json.*;


JSONObject obj = new JSONObject(" .... ");
String pageName = obj.getJSONObject("pageInfo").getString("pageName");

JSONArray arr = obj.getJSONArray("posts");
for (int i = 0; i < arr.length(); i++)
{
    String post_id = arr.getJSONObject(i).getString("post_id");
    ......
}

You may find extra examples from: Parse JSON in Java

Downloadable jar: http://mvnrepository.com/artifact/org.json/json

share|improve this answer
9  
Where is the jar file for this? – JohnMerlino Jun 4 '14 at 0:37
8  
org.json jar can be found here: http://mvnrepository.com/artifact/org.json/json – Dylan Hogg Jun 5 '14 at 4:32
64  
You got to be kidding me. Of literally dozens of libraries, this is has pretty much nothing to recommend it for. Vastly better choices include Gson, Genson, Jackson and FlexJson. – StaxMan Oct 24 '14 at 5:07
4  
I agree with @StaxMan. I just tried org.json and it's horribly cumbersome. It really doesn't play with with standard Java Collection types, for example. – Ken Williams Nov 12 '14 at 16:55
5  
@OmarIthawi that is just silly. It's a proof-of-concept with awkward API, inefficient implementation. I think it is better to consider libraries on their own merits, instead of trying to deduce quality out of its authors visibility -- Doug has achieved many things, but that does not really change qualities of the particular lib. 10 years ago it was the only game in town, but since then there has been much positive progress. It's like Struts of json libs. – StaxMan Nov 19 '15 at 18:54

For the sake of the example lets assume you have a class Person with just a name.

private class Person {
    public String name;

    public Person(String name) {
        this.name = name;
    }
}

Google GSON (Maven)

My personal favourite as to the great JSON serialisation / de-serialisation of objects.

Gson g = new Gson();

Person person = g.fromJson("{\"name\": \"John\"}", Person.class);
System.out.println(person.name); //John

System.out.println(g.toJson(person)); // {"name":"John"}

Update

If you want to get a single attribute out you can do it easily with the Google library as well:

JsonObject jsonObject = new JsonParser().parse("{\"name\": \"John\"}").getAsJsonObject();

System.out.println(jsonObject.get("name").getAsString()); //John

Org.JSON (Maven)

If you don't need object de-serialisation but to simply get an attribute, you can try org.json (or look GSON example above!)

JSONObject obj = new JSONObject("{\"name\": \"John\"}");

System.out.println(obj.getString("name")); //John

Jackson (Maven)

ObjectMapper mapper = new ObjectMapper();
Person user = mapper.readValue("{\"name\": \"John\"}", Person.class);

System.out.println(user.name); //John
share|improve this answer
4  
Good answer. One suggestion for minor improvement: both GSON and Jackson also support use of JSON tree representation (for Jackson these are JsonNodes, GSON has something similar). Might be good to show snippets, since that is similar to the only way org.json offers. – StaxMan Oct 6 '15 at 18:05
    
Two other libraries worth mentioning (in the interest of completeness): json-simple and Oracle's JSONP – jake stayman Apr 1 at 19:04
    
@NeonWarge, why? It seems to me that this answer assumes one has already defined a Java class that contains exactly the same fields as the JSON string, nothing less and nothing more. This is quite a strong assumption. – Andrea Lazzarotto Apr 9 at 20:40

quick-json parser is very straight forward, flexible, very fast and customizable. Try it

Features:

  • Compliant with JSON specification (RFC4627)
  • High-Performance JSON parser
  • Supports Flexible/Configurable parsing approach
  • Configurable validation of key/value pairs of any JSON Heirarchy
  • Easy to use # Very small footprint
  • Raises developer friendly and easy to trace exceptions
  • Pluggable Custom Validation support - Keys/Values can be validated by configuring custom validators as and when encountered
  • Validating and Non-Validating parser support
  • Support for two types of configuration (JSON/XML) for using quick-json validating parser
  • Requires JDK 1.5
  • No dependency on external libraries
  • Support for Json Generation through object serialization
  • Support for collection type selection during parsing process

It can be used like this:

JsonParserFactory factory=JsonParserFactory.getInstance();
JSONParser parser=factory.newJsonParser();
Map jsonMap=parser.parseJson(jsonString);
share|improve this answer
3  
Is there a javadoc available? – jboi Sep 10 '13 at 11:38
11  
This package cannot handle empty values when parsing. For example: ... "description":"" ... throws an Exception – Ivan Oct 25 '13 at 15:45
3  
I've fixed this issue (and many others) in code.google.com/p/quick-json/issues/detail?id=11 I hope the author will give take the time to fix it in the official release. – noamik Aug 8 '14 at 12:28
6  
Of listed features, nothing is unique compared to other options -- and claim of high-performance is not supported by anything; unlike for more mature libraries (Gson, Jackson, Genson, Boon) which are included in benchmarks like github.com/eishay/jvm-serializers, github.com/novoj/JavaJsonPerformanceTest or developer.com/lang/jscript/… -- I have not seen this library included in tests, or mentions of it being widely used. – StaxMan Oct 24 '14 at 5:12
2  
I just tried version 1.0.4 and it seems to have quite a few bugs regarding parsing arrays (empty arrays as well as arrays of objects) – Mene Mar 10 '15 at 17:47
  1. If one wants to create JAVA object from JSON and vice versa, use GSON or JACKSON third party jars etc

    //from object to JSON 
    Gson gson = new Gson();
    gson.toJson(yourObject);
    
    // from JSON to object 
    yourObject o = gson.fromJson(JSONString,yourObject.class);
    
  2. But if one just want to parse a JSON string and get some values, (OR create a JSON string from scratch to send over wire ) just use Jave EE jar which contains JsonReader, JsonArray , JsonObject etc . You may want to download the implementation of that spec like javax.json. With these two jars i am able to parse the json and use the values. These API's actually follow the DOM / SAX parsing model of XML .

        Response response = request.get(); // REST call 
        JsonReader jsonReader = Json.createReader(new StringReader(response.readEntity(String.class)));
        JsonArray jsonArray = jsonReader.readArray();
        ListIterator l = jsonArray.listIterator();
        while ( l.hasNext() ) {
              JsonObject j = (JsonObject)l.next();
              JsonObject ciAttr = j.getJsonObject("ciAttributes") ;
    
share|improve this answer
1  
why the downvote ? what is wrong ?? please enlighten me ! :-) – nondescript Feb 26 '15 at 19:21
    
I, too, would like to know why this was downvoted. It seems like a sensible suggestion, at least in the context of JEE environments that run Java 7. – pglezen Feb 28 '15 at 23:34
2  
@nondescript If I had to guess I'd say it was downvoted because it doesn't answer the original poster's question: "What is the required code?" The answers that were upvoted provided code snippets. – jewbix.cube Apr 27 '15 at 21:40
3  
Note: Jackson and GSON both support tree-style and/or Maps/Lists binding, so there is no need to use Java EE (javax.json) package. javax.json has little to offer beyond either Jackson or GSON. – StaxMan Jun 1 '15 at 23:10

I believe the best practice should be to go through the official Java JSON API which are still work in progress.

share|improve this answer
6  
Since I replied, I started using Jackson and I think it's one of the best libraries out there for JSON de-serialization. – Giovanni Botta Sep 11 '14 at 14:26
2  
Why do they re-use JSONP to mean something different than JSON with Padding?... – Chris Wesseling May 14 '15 at 5:53
    
@ChrisWesseling What do you mean? – Giovanni Botta May 14 '15 at 18:43
    
"Java API for JSON Processing (JSON-P)" is the title of the document you link to. And it confused me, because I knew JSONP to mean something else. – Chris Wesseling May 14 '15 at 18:48
1  
@ChrisWesseling oh that is confusing. That's what they chose for the specification. However as I said, I would go straight to Jackson. – Giovanni Botta May 14 '15 at 18:50

This blew my mind with how easy it was. You can just pass a String holding your JSON to the constructor of a JSONObject in the default org.json package.

JSONArray rootOfPage =  new JSONArray(JSONString);

Done. Drops microphone. This works with JSONObjects as well. After that, you can just look through your hierarchy of Objects using the get() methods on your objects.

share|improve this answer
4  
The JSONArray type is not part of the J2SE JDK API and you don't say which API or third-party library provides this type. – Bobulous Apr 24 '15 at 22:22
    
Not that I would recommend using it, but I think this refers to the "org.json" package from json.org/java. It used to be used before good Java libraries became available, but this was years ago (2008 or before) – StaxMan Jun 1 '15 at 23:11

Almost all the answers given requires a full deserialization of the JSON into a Java object before accessing the value in the property of interest. Another alternative, which does not go this route is to use JsonPATH which is like XPath for JSON and allows traversing of JSON objects.

It is a specification and the good folks at JayWay have created a Java implementation for the specification which you can find here: https://github.com/jayway/JsonPath

So basically to use it, add it to your project, eg:

<dependency>
    <groupId>com.jayway.jsonpath</groupId>
    <artifactId>json-path</artifactId>
    <version>${version}</version>
</dependency>

and to use:

String pageName = JsonPath.read(yourJsonString, "$.pageInfo.pageName");
String pagePic = JsonPath.read(yourJsonString, "$.pageInfo.pagePic");
String post_id = JsonPath.read(yourJsonString, "$.pagePosts[0].post_id");

etc...

Check the JsonPath specification page for more information on the other ways to transverse JSON.

share|improve this answer

If you have some Java class(say Message) representing the JSON string(jsonString), you can use Jackson JSON library with:

Message message= new ObjectMapper().readValue(jsonString, Message.class);

and from message object you can fetch any of its attribute.

share|improve this answer

The below example shows how to read the text in the question, represented as the "jsonText" variable. This solution uses the Java EE7 javax.json API (which is mentioned in some of the other answers). The reason I've added it as a separate answer is that the following code shows how to actually access some of the values shown in the question. An implementation of the javax.json API would be required to make this code run. The full package for each of the classes required was included as I didn't want to declare "import" statements.

javax.json.JsonReader jr = 
    javax.json.Json.createReader(new StringReader(jsonText));
javax.json.JsonObject jo = jr.readObject();

//Read the page info.
javax.json.JsonObject pageInfo = jo.getJsonObject("pageInfo");
System.out.println(pageInfo.getString("pageName"));

//Read the posts.
javax.json.JsonArray posts = jo.getJsonArray("posts");
//Read the first post.
javax.json.JsonObject post = posts.getJsonObject(0);
//Read the post_id field.
String postId = post.getString("post_id");

Now, before anyone goes and downvotes this answer because it doesn't use GSON, org.json, Jackson, or any of the other 3rd party frameworks available, it's an example of "required code" per the question to parse the provided text. I am well aware that adherence to the current standard JSR 353 was not being considered for JDK 9 and as such the JSR 353 spec should be treated the same as any other 3rd party JSON handling implementation.

share|improve this answer

Please do something like this:

JSONParser jsonParser = new JSONParser();
JSONObject obj = (JSONObject) jsonParser.parse(contentString);
String product = (String) jsonObject.get("productId");
share|improve this answer
1  
Er, which library is this? – Stewart Mar 19 at 22:57

Gson is easy to learn and implement, what we need to know are following two methods

  • toJson() – Convert Java object to JSON format

  • fromJson() – Convert JSON into Java object

`

import java.io.BufferedReader;
import java.io.FileReader;
import java.io.IOException;
import com.google.gson.Gson;

public class GsonExample {
    public static void main(String[] args) {

    Gson gson = new Gson();

    try {

        BufferedReader br = new BufferedReader(
            new FileReader("c:\\file.json"));

        //convert the json string back to object
        DataObject obj = gson.fromJson(br, DataObject.class);

        System.out.println(obj);

    } catch (IOException e) {
        e.printStackTrace();
    }

    }
}

`

share|improve this answer
    
For complete knowledge on Gson refer below links. github.com/google/gson/blob/master/UserGuide.md – venkat Feb 5 at 6:24

You could use Google Gson

Using this library you only need to create a model with the same json structure. Then the model is automatically filled in. You have to call your variables as your json keys, or use @SerializedName if you want to use different names.

For your example:

Json:

{
"pageInfo": {
     "pageName": "abc",
     "pagePic": "http://example.com/content.jpg"
}
"posts": [
     {
          "post_id": "123456789012_123456789012",
          "actor_id": "1234567890",
          "picOfPersonWhoPosted": "http://example.com/photo.jpg",
          "nameOfPersonWhoPosted": "Jane Doe",
          "message": "Sounds cool. Can't wait to see it!",
          "likesCount": "2",
          "comments": [],
          "timeOfPost": "1234567890"
     }
]

}

Model:

class MyModel {

    private PageInfo pageInfo;
    private ArrayList<Post> posts = new ArrayList<>();
}

class PageInfo {

    private String pageName;
    private String pagePic;
}

class Post {

    private String post_id;

    @SerializedName("actor_id") // <- example SerializedName
    private String actorId;

    private String picOfPersonWhoPosted;
    private String picOfPersonWhoPosted;
    private String message;
    private String likesCount;
    private ArrayList<String> comments;
    private String timeOfPost;
}

Now you can parse using Gson library:

MyModel model = gson.fromJson(jsonString, MyModel.class);

You can generate model from json automatically using online tools like this

share|improve this answer

There are many JSON libraries available in Java.

The most notorious ones are: Jackson, GSON, Genson, FastJson and org.json.

There are typically three things one should look at for choosing any library:

  1. Performance
  2. Ease of use (code is simple to write and legible) - that goes with features.
  3. For mobile apps: dependency/jar size

Specifically for JSON libraries (and any serialization/deserialization libs), databinding is also usually of interest as it removes the need of writing boiler-plate code to pack/unpack the data.

For 1, see this benchmark: https://github.com/fabienrenaud/java-json-benchmark I did using JMH which compares (jackson, gson, genson, fastjson, org.json, jsonp) performance of serializers and deserializers using stream and databind APIs. For 2, you can find numerous examples on the Internet. The benchmark above can also be used as a source of examples...

Quick takeaway of the benchmark: Jackson performs 5 to 6 times better than org.json and more than twice better than GSON.

For your particular example, the following code decodes your json with jackson:

public class MyObj {

    private PageInfo pageInfo;
    private List<Post> posts;

    static final class PageInfo {
        private String pageName;
        private String pagePic;
    }

    static final class Post {
        private String post_id;
        @JsonProperty("actor_id");
        private String actorId;
        @JsonProperty("picOfPersonWhoPosted")
        private String pictureOfPoster;
        @JsonProperty("nameOfPersonWhoPosted")
        private String nameOfPoster;
        private String likesCount;
        private List<String> comments;
        private String timeOfPost;
    }

    private static final ObjectMapper JACKSON = new ObjectMapper();
    public static void main(String[] args) throws IOException {
        MyObj o = JACKSON.readValue(args[0], MyObj.class); // assumes args[0] contains your json payload provided in your question.
    }
}

Let me know if you have any questions.

share|improve this answer

A - Explanation

You can use Jackson libraries, for binding JSON String into POJO (Plain Old Java Object) instances. POJO is simply a class with only private fields and public getter/setter methods. Jackson is going to traverse the methods (using reflection), and maps the JSON object into the POJO instance as the field names of the class fits to the field names of the JSON object.

In your JSON object, which is actually a composite object, the main object consists o two sub-objects. So, our POJO classes should have the same hierarchy. I'll call the whole JSON Object as Page object. Page object consist of a PageInfo object, and a Post object array.

So we have to create three different POJO classes;

  • Page Class, a composite of PageInfo Class and array of Post Instances
  • PageInfo Class
  • Posts Class

The only package I've used is Jackson ObjectMapper, what we do is binding data;

com.fasterxml.jackson.databind.ObjectMapper

The required dependencies, the jar files is listed below;

  • jackson-core-2.5.1.jar
  • jackson-databind-2.5.1.jar
  • jackson-annotations-2.5.0.jar

Here is the required code;

B - Main POJO Class : Page

package com.levo.jsonex.model;

public class Page {

    private PageInfo pageInfo;
    private Post[] posts;

    public PageInfo getPageInfo() {
        return pageInfo;
    }

    public void setPageInfo(PageInfo pageInfo) {
        this.pageInfo = pageInfo;
    }

    public Post[] getPosts() {
        return posts;
    }

    public void setPosts(Post[] posts) {
        this.posts = posts;
    }

}

C - Child POJO Class : PageInfo

package com.levo.jsonex.model;

public class PageInfo {

    private String pageName;
    private String pagePic;

    public String getPageName() {
        return pageName;
    }

    public void setPageName(String pageName) {
        this.pageName = pageName;
    }

    public String getPagePic() {
        return pagePic;
    }

    public void setPagePic(String pagePic) {
        this.pagePic = pagePic;
    }

}

D - Child POJO Class : Post

package com.levo.jsonex.model;

public class Post {

    private String post_id;
    private String actor_id;
    private String picOfPersonWhoPosted;
    private String nameOfPersonWhoPosted;
    private String message;
    private int likesCount;
    private String[] comments;
    private int timeOfPost;

    public String getPost_id() {
        return post_id;
    }

    public void setPost_id(String post_id) {
        this.post_id = post_id;
    }

    public String getActor_id() {
        return actor_id;
    }

    public void setActor_id(String actor_id) {
        this.actor_id = actor_id;
    }

    public String getPicOfPersonWhoPosted() {
        return picOfPersonWhoPosted;
    }

    public void setPicOfPersonWhoPosted(String picOfPersonWhoPosted) {
        this.picOfPersonWhoPosted = picOfPersonWhoPosted;
    }

    public String getNameOfPersonWhoPosted() {
        return nameOfPersonWhoPosted;
    }

    public void setNameOfPersonWhoPosted(String nameOfPersonWhoPosted) {
        this.nameOfPersonWhoPosted = nameOfPersonWhoPosted;
    }

    public String getMessage() {
        return message;
    }

    public void setMessage(String message) {
        this.message = message;
    }

    public int getLikesCount() {
        return likesCount;
    }

    public void setLikesCount(int likesCount) {
        this.likesCount = likesCount;
    }

    public String[] getComments() {
        return comments;
    }

    public void setComments(String[] comments) {
        this.comments = comments;
    }

    public int getTimeOfPost() {
        return timeOfPost;
    }

    public void setTimeOfPost(int timeOfPost) {
        this.timeOfPost = timeOfPost;
    }

}

E - Sample JSON File : sampleJSONFile.json

I've just copied your JSON sample into this file and put it under the project folder.

{
   "pageInfo": {
         "pageName": "abc",
         "pagePic": "http://example.com/content.jpg"
    },
    "posts": [
         {
              "post_id": "123456789012_123456789012",
              "actor_id": "1234567890",
              "picOfPersonWhoPosted": "http://example.com/photo.jpg",
              "nameOfPersonWhoPosted": "Jane Doe",
              "message": "Sounds cool. Can't wait to see it!",
              "likesCount": "2",
              "comments": [],
              "timeOfPost": "1234567890"
         }
    ]
}

F - Demo Code

package com.levo.jsonex;

import java.io.File;
import java.io.IOException;
import java.util.Arrays;

import com.fasterxml.jackson.databind.ObjectMapper;
import com.levo.jsonex.model.Page;
import com.levo.jsonex.model.PageInfo;
import com.levo.jsonex.model.Post;

public class JSONDemo {

    public static void main(String[] args) {
        ObjectMapper objectMapper = new ObjectMapper();

        try {
            Page page = objectMapper.readValue(new File("sampleJSONFile.json"), Page.class);

            printParsedObject(page);
        } catch (IOException e) {
            e.printStackTrace();
        }

    }

    private static void printParsedObject(Page page) {
        printPageInfo(page.getPageInfo());
        System.out.println();
        printPosts(page.getPosts());
    }

    private static void printPageInfo(PageInfo pageInfo) {
        System.out.println("Page Info;");
        System.out.println("**********");
        System.out.println("\tPage Name : " + pageInfo.getPageName());
        System.out.println("\tPage Pic  : " + pageInfo.getPagePic());
    }

    private static void printPosts(Post[] posts) {
        System.out.println("Page Posts;");
        System.out.println("**********");
        for(Post post : posts) {
            printPost(post);
        }
    }

    private static void printPost(Post post) {
        System.out.println("\tPost Id                   : " + post.getPost_id());
        System.out.println("\tActor Id                  : " + post.getActor_id());
        System.out.println("\tPic Of Person Who Posted  : " + post.getPicOfPersonWhoPosted());
        System.out.println("\tName Of Person Who Posted : " + post.getNameOfPersonWhoPosted());
        System.out.println("\tMessage                   : " + post.getMessage());
        System.out.println("\tLikes Count               : " + post.getLikesCount());
        System.out.println("\tComments                  : " + Arrays.toString(post.getComments()));
        System.out.println("\tTime Of Post              : " + post.getTimeOfPost());
    }

}

G - Demo Output

Page Info;
****(*****
    Page Name : abc
    Page Pic  : http://example.com/content.jpg
Page Posts;
**********
    Post Id                   : 123456789012_123456789012
    Actor Id                  : 1234567890
    Pic Of Person Who Posted  : http://example.com/photo.jpg
    Name Of Person Who Posted : Jane Doe
    Message                   : Sounds cool. Can't wait to see it!
    Likes Count               : 2
    Comments                  : []
    Time Of Post              : 1234567890
share|improve this answer
{
   "pageInfo": {
         "pageName": "abc",
         "pagePic": "http://example.com/content.jpg"
    },
    "posts": [
         {
              "post_id": "123456789012_123456789012",
              "actor_id": "1234567890",
              "picOfPersonWhoPosted": "http://example.com/photo.jpg",
              "nameOfPersonWhoPosted": "Jane Doe",
              "message": "Sounds cool. Can't wait to see it!",
              "likesCount": "2",
              "comments": [],
              "timeOfPost": "1234567890"
         }
    ]
}

Java code :

JSONObject obj = new JSONObject(responsejsonobj);
String pageName = obj.getJSONObject("pageInfo").getString("pageName");

JSONArray arr = obj.getJSONArray("posts");
for (int i = 0; i < arr.length(); i++)
{
    String post_id = arr.getJSONObject(i).getString("post_id");
    ......etc
}
share|improve this answer
4  
Please explain your answer as code-only answers help others far less than well documented code. See "give a man a fish and you feed him for a day; teach a man to fish and you feed him for a lifetime". – Wai Ha Lee Jul 28 '15 at 15:04
    
Would be good to mention this is for 'org.json' lib. However, I do not think this is a good way to do it at all being very verbose, and 'org.json' lib itself being obsolete (slow, cumbersome API). There are better choices: GSON, Jackson, Boon, Genson to use. – StaxMan Oct 6 '15 at 18:07

In addition to other answers, I recomend this online opensource service jsonschema2pojo.org for quick generating Java classes from json or json schema for GSON, Jackson 1.x or Jackson 2.x. For example, if you have:

{
   "pageInfo": {
         "pageName": "abc",
         "pagePic": "http://example.com/content.jpg"
    }
    "posts": [
         {
              "post_id": "123456789012_123456789012",
              "actor_id": 1234567890,
              "picOfPersonWhoPosted": "http://example.com/photo.jpg",
              "nameOfPersonWhoPosted": "Jane Doe",
              "message": "Sounds cool. Can't wait to see it!",
              "likesCount": 2,
              "comments": [],
              "timeOfPost": 1234567890
         }
    ]
}

The jsonschema2pojo.org for GSON generated:

@Generated("org.jsonschema2pojo")
public class Container {
    @SerializedName("pageInfo")
    @Expose
    public PageInfo pageInfo;
    @SerializedName("posts")
    @Expose
    public List<Post> posts = new ArrayList<Post>();
}

@Generated("org.jsonschema2pojo")
public class PageInfo {
    @SerializedName("pageName")
    @Expose
    public String pageName;
    @SerializedName("pagePic")
    @Expose
    public String pagePic;
}

@Generated("org.jsonschema2pojo")
public class Post {
    @SerializedName("post_id")
    @Expose
    public String postId;
    @SerializedName("actor_id")
    @Expose
    public long actorId;
    @SerializedName("picOfPersonWhoPosted")
    @Expose
    public String picOfPersonWhoPosted;
    @SerializedName("nameOfPersonWhoPosted")
    @Expose
    public String nameOfPersonWhoPosted;
    @SerializedName("message")
    @Expose
    public String message;
    @SerializedName("likesCount")
    @Expose
    public long likesCount;
    @SerializedName("comments")
    @Expose
    public List<Object> comments = new ArrayList<Object>();
    @SerializedName("timeOfPost")
    @Expose
    public long timeOfPost;
}
share|improve this answer

Read following blog json in java

This post is a little bit old but still i want to answer you Question

Step 1: Create a pojo class of your data.

Step 2: now create a object using json.

Employee employee = null;
ObjectMapper mapper = new ObjectMapper();
try{
employee =  mapper.readValue(newFile("/home/sumit/employee.json"),Employee.class);
} catch (JsonGenerationException e){
e.printStackTrace();
}

For further reference you can refer following link

Thanks

share|improve this answer

Top answers on this page use too simple examples like object with one property (e.g. {name: value}). I think that still simple but real life example can help someone.

So this is the JSON returned by Google Translate API:

{
  "data": 
     {
        "translations": 
          [
            {
              "translatedText": "Arbeit"
             }
          ]
     }
}

I want to retrieve the value of "translatedText" attribute e.g. "Arbeit" using Google's Gson.

Two possible approaches:

  1. Retrieve just one needed attribute

    String json  = callToTranslateApi("work", "de");
    JsonObject jsonObject = new JsonParser().parse(json).getAsJsonObject();
    return jsonObject.get("data").getAsJsonObject()
            .get("translations").getAsJsonArray()
            .get(0).getAsJsonObject()
            .get("translatedText").getAsString();
    
  2. Create Java object from JSON

    class ApiResponse {
        Data data;      
        class Data {
            Translation[] translations;         
            class Translation {
                String translatedText;
            }
         }
     }
    

    ...

     Gson g = new Gson();
     String json =callToTranslateApi("work", "de");
     ApiResponse response = g.fromJson(json, ApiResponse.class);
     return response.data.translations[0].translatedText;
    
share|improve this answer

you can use Jayway JsonPath. below is github link with source code,pom details and good documentation.

https://github.com/jayway/JsonPath

Please follow below steps.

Step 1: add jayway json path dependency in your class path using maven or download jar file and manually add it.

<dependency>
            <groupId>com.jayway.jsonpath</groupId>
            <artifactId>json-path</artifactId>
            <version>2.2.0</version>
</dependency>

Step 2: please save your input json as file for this example. in my case i saved your json as sampleJson.txt. Note you missed a comma between pageInfo and posts

Step 3: read the json contents from above file using bufferedReader and save it as String.

BufferedReader br = new BufferedReader(new FileReader("D:\\sampleJson.txt"));

        StringBuilder sb = new StringBuilder();
        String line = br.readLine();

        while (line != null) {
            sb.append(line);
            sb.append(System.lineSeparator());
            line = br.readLine();
        }
        br.close();
        String jsonInput = sb.toString();

Step 4: parse your json string using jayway json parser.

Object document = Configuration.defaultConfiguration().jsonProvider().parse(jsonInput);

Step 5: read the details like below.

String pageName = JsonPath.read(document, "$.pageInfo.pageName");
String pagePic = JsonPath.read(document, "$.pageInfo.pagePic");
String post_id = JsonPath.read(document, "$.posts[0].post_id");

System.out.println("$.pageInfo.pageName "+pageName);
System.out.println("$.pageInfo.pagePic "+pagePic);
System.out.println("$.posts[0].post_id "+post_id);

Output will be:

$.pageInfo.pageName = abc
$.pageInfo.pagePic = http://example.com/content.jpg
$.posts[0].post_id  = 123456789012_123456789012
share|improve this answer

You can use Jaunt (http://jaunt-api.com), which has a lot of example code in the JSON parsing tutorial:

UserAgent ua = new UserAgent();
ua.openJSON(...);    //open the JSON from String, File, or from url

System.out.println("pageName: " + ua.json.findFirst("pageName"));
System.out.println("pagePic: " + ua.json.findFirst("pagePic"));

for(JNode postId : userAgent.findEach("post_id")){
  System.out.println("post_id: " + postId);
}
share|improve this answer
static Object jsonParser(String jsonStr, String key) throws JSONException {
    int i = 0;
    Object temp = null;
    Object json = new JSONObject(jsonStr);
    String[] keys = key.split("[.]");
    while (i < keys.length) {

        if (json instanceof JSONArray) {
            int index = Integer.parseInt(keys[i]);
            temp = ((JSONArray) json).get(index);
        } else if (json instanceof JSONObject) {
            temp = ((JSONObject) json).get(keys[i]);
        }
        json = temp;
        i++;
    }
    return temp;
}
share|improve this answer
29  
It's generally a good idea to explain why your code answers the question. – ApproachingDarknessFish Jan 14 '14 at 20:38

protected by Bhargav Rao Sep 1 '15 at 19:06

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