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I need to execute a command 100-200 times, and so far my research indicates that I would either have to copy/paste 100 copies of this command, OR use a for loop, but the for loop expects a list of items, hence I would need 200 files to operate on, or a list of 200 items, hence defeating the point.

I would rather not have to write a C program and go through the length of documenting why I had to write another program to execute my program for test purposes. Modification of my program itself is also not an option.

So, given a command, <a>, how would I execute it N times via a batch script?

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6 Answers 6

up vote 171 down vote accepted

for /l is your friend:

for /l %x in (1, 1, 100) do echo %x

Starts at 1, steps by one, and finishes at 100.

Use two %s if it's in a batch file

for /l %%x in (1, 1, 100) do echo %%x

(which is one of the things I really really hate about windows scripting)

If you have multiple commands for each iteration of the loop, do this:

for /l %x in (1, 1, 100) do (
   echo %x
   copy %x.txt z:\whatever\etc
)
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Much better than my solution, provided we're talking about a reasonably modern DOS. –  Carl Smotricz Apr 7 '10 at 11:02
    
@Carl I would hope that in 2010 you could at least assume NT Command Extensions are present :P –  Jon Apr 7 '10 at 11:04
1  
That depends on how literally we are to take the "DOS" reference. The latest version of MS-DOS, 7.1, dates back to 1997 and AFAIK doesn't have these extensions. The command shells delivered with Windows, on the other hand, of course do. –  Carl Smotricz Apr 7 '10 at 11:55
1  
Can you explain what this means exactly? For example, what's %x? \l? –  Imray Jan 13 '14 at 7:58
3  
@Imray %x is the loop variable, /l (not \l) means that the for command will operate in a numerical fashion, rather than operating on a set of files. –  Jon Jan 14 '14 at 23:20

And to iterate on the files of a directory:

@echo off 
setlocal enableDelayedExpansion 

set MYDIR=C:\something
for /F %%x in ('dir /B/D %MYDIR%') do (
  set FILENAME=%MYDIR%\%%x\log\IL_ERROR.log
  echo ===========================  Search in !FILENAME! ===========================
  c:\utils\grep motiv !FILENAME!
)

You must use "enableDelayedExpansion" and !FILENAME! instead of $FILENAME$. In the second case, DOS will interpret the variable only once (before it enters the loop) and not each time the program loops.

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7  
Thanks for posting this -- I know it's not what the OP was asking, but it's what I was searching for when I ended up here. –  BrainSlugs83 Jun 5 '13 at 20:42

Or you can decrement/increment a variable by the number of times you want to loop:

SETLOCAL ENABLEDELAYEDEXPANSION
SET counter=200
:Beginning
IF %counter% NEQ 0 (
echo %x
copy %x.txt z:\whatever\etc
SET /A counter=%counter%-1
GOTO Beginning
) ELSE (
ENDLOCAL
SET counter=
GOTO:eof

Obviously, using FOR /L is the highway and this is the backstreet that takes longer, but it gets to the same destination.

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You could do something to the following effect avoiding the FOR loop.

set counter=0
:loop
echo "input commands here"
SET /A counter=%counter%+1
if %counter% GTR 200
(GOTO exit) else (GOTO loop)
:exit
exit
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DOS doesn't offer very elegant mechanisms for this, but I think you can still code a loop for 100 or 200 iterations with reasonable effort. While there's not a numeric for loop, you can use a character string as a "loop variable."

Code the loop using GOTO, and for each iteration use SET X=%X%@ to add yet another @ sign to an environment variable X; and to exit the loop, compare the value of X with a string of 100 (or 200) @ signs.

I never said this was elegant, but it should work!

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1  
The /a option of the SET command will evaluate a numerical expression for the right side value. See the doucmentation for SET. It is not necessary to do the concatenation trick. –  Adam Porad Sep 13 '13 at 15:16

Template for a simple but counted loop:

set loopcount=[Number of times]
:loop
[Commands you want to repeat]
set /a loopcount=loopcount-1
if %loopcount%==0 goto exitloop
goto loop
:exitloop

Example: Say "Hello World!" 5 times:

@echo off
set loopcount=5
:loop
echo Hello World!
set /a loopcount=loopcount-1
if %loopcount%==0 goto exitloop
goto loop
:exitloop
pause

This example will output:

Hello World!
Hello World!
Hello World!
Hello World!
Hello World!
Press any key to continue . . .
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1  
A nearly same answer is given already –  jeb Mar 10 at 9:47
    
Nothing wrong with that if it's written better –  Tom J Nowell Mar 10 at 18:22
    
this is the only loop code i was able to use on my win7 pc. All the others found by googleing do not work. –  user193655 Mar 23 at 14:56

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