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I'm trying to come up with an algorithm that will print out all possible ways to sum N integers so that they total a given value.

Example. Print all ways to sum 4 integers so that they sum up to be 5.

Result should be something like:

5 0 0 0
4 1 0 0
3 2 0 0
3 1 1 0
2 3 0 0
2 2 1 0
2 1 2 0
2 1 1 1
1 4 0 0
1 3 1 0 
1 2 2 0
1 2 1 1
1 1 3 0
1 1 2 1
1 1 1 2
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3  
is it homework? – Jack Apr 7 '10 at 15:36
    
-1: What have you tried? Homework questions are acceptable if you admit that the question pertains to homework and that you've made a good faith attempt to solve the problem yourself first. meta.stackexchange.com/questions/10811/… – Jim G. Apr 7 '10 at 15:47
4  
only positive integers? because with negatives, it would be infinite... – Etamar Laron Apr 7 '10 at 15:48
1  
the way you structured the answer to your example should actually give you an idea of a simple algorithm to start with – FromCanada Apr 7 '10 at 15:51
    
Yes only positive integers. Also, not really for homework but its a small part of something im working on. Looking at the sample output i put, i can see a pattern that suggests this should be done recursively. I have been working ways to do this but i suck at explaining things so I didnt explain what i have tried. I was just hoping to get some ideas from here. If not thats fine, i still have time to figure this out. Thanks – noghead Apr 7 '10 at 16:16
up vote 2 down vote accepted

This is based off Alinium's code.
I modified it so it prints out all the possible combinations, since his already does all the permutations.
Also, I don't think you need the for loop when n=1, because in that case, only one number should cause the sum to equal value.
Various other modifications to get boundary cases to work.

def sum(n, value):
    arr = [0]*n  # create an array of size n, filled with zeroes
    sumRecursive(n, value, 0, n, arr);

def sumRecursive(n, value, sumSoFar, topLevel, arr):
    if n == 1:
        if sumSoFar <= value:
            #Make sure it's in ascending order (or only level)
            if topLevel == 1 or (value - sumSoFar >= arr[-2]):
                arr[(-1)] = value - sumSoFar #put it in the n_th last index of arr
                print arr
    elif n > 0:
        #Make sure it's in ascending order
        start = 0
        if (n != topLevel):
            start = arr[(-1*n)-1]   #the value before this element

        for i in range(start, value+1): # i = start...value
            arr[(-1*n)] = i  # put i in the n_th last index of arr
            sumRecursive(n-1, value, sumSoFar + i, topLevel, arr)

Runing sums(4, 5) returns:
[0, 0, 0, 5]
[0, 0, 1, 4]
[0, 0, 2, 3]
[0, 1, 1, 3]
[1, 1, 1, 2]

share|improve this answer
    
What you say it returns arent all the ways to sum 4 integers to add up to 5.....or am i not understanding what you wrote? – noghead Apr 7 '10 at 19:10
    
From what they mentioned it only prints combinations. Such that, here [1,1,1,2] is treated as being equivalent to [1,1,2,1] and [1,2,1,1] and [2,1,1,1], so only one is returned instead of all four. – FromCanada Apr 7 '10 at 20:25
    
I see. But what about [0,1,2,2]? Did muddybruin just forget to put this as one of the combinations or does his solution not return it? Havent had the chance to run his solution yet. – noghead Apr 7 '10 at 20:57
    
You're right, [0, 1, 2, 2] is another solution. I don't know why [0, 1, 2, 2] isn't in there, but I reran the code and it does show up. – muddybruin Apr 8 '10 at 8:02
    
yeah, after running it myself i saw that it does aswell. Thanks for all your help. – noghead Apr 9 '10 at 13:56

In pure math, a way of summing integers to get a given total is called a partition. There is a lot of information around if you google for "integer partition". You are looking for integer partitions where there are a specific number of elements. I'm sure you could take one of the known generating mechanisms and adapt for this extra condition. Wikipedia has a good overview of the topic Partition_(number_theory). Mathematica even has a function to do what you want: IntegerPartitions[5, 4].

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks, I didnt realize this was called integer partition. – noghead Apr 9 '10 at 13:56
    
The code for that in matematica is just IntegerPartitions[yourDesiredResut, numberOfIntegersInSum, yourSet]. Nice and clean – Dr. belisarius Jun 5 '10 at 17:14

The key to solving the problem is recursion. Here's a working implementation in python. It prints out all possible permutations that sum up to the total. You'll probably want to get rid of the duplicate combinations, possibly by using some Set or hashing mechanism to filter them out.

def sum(n, value):
    arr = [0]*n  # create an array of size n, filled with zeroes
    sumRecursive(n, value, 0, n, arr);

def sumRecursive(n, value, sumSoFar, topLevel, arr):
    if n == 1:
        if sumSoFar > value:
            return False
        else:
            for i in range(value+1): # i = 0...value
                if (sumSoFar + i) == value:
                    arr[(-1*n)] = i # put i in the n_th last index of arr
                    print arr;
                    return True

    else:
        for i in range(value+1): # i = 0...value
            arr[(-1*n)] = i  # put i in the n_th last index of arr
            if sumRecursive(n-1, value, sumSoFar + i, topLevel, arr):
                if (n == topLevel):
                    print "\n"

With some extra effort, this can probably be simplified to get rid of some of the parameters I am passing to the recursive function. As suggested by redcayuga's pseudo code, using a stack, instead of manually managing an array, would be a better idea too.

share|improve this answer
    
thanks, I will try your solution when i get off work. – noghead Apr 7 '10 at 19:07

I haven't tested this:

  procedure allSum (int tot, int n, int desiredTotal) return int
       if n > 0
           int i = 
           for (int i = tot; i>=0; i--) {
               push i onto stack;
               allSum(tot-i, n-1, desiredTotal);
               pop top of stack
            }
        else if n==0
            if stack sums to desiredTotal then print the stack   end if
        end if

I'm sure there's a better way to do this.

share|improve this answer
    
what does p reference in i >= p? – Matt Ellen Apr 9 '10 at 13:09
    
The "p" should have been a zero (0). They're right next to each other on the keyboard.... – redcayuga Apr 9 '10 at 13:34

i've find a ruby way with domain specification based on Alinium's code

class Domain_partition

    attr_reader :results,
                :domain,
                :sum,
                :size

    def initialize(_dom, _size, _sum)
        _dom.is_a?(Array) ? @domain=_dom.sort : @domain= _dom.to_a
        @results, @sum, @size = [], _sum, _size
        arr = [0]*size  # create an array of size n, filled with zeroes
        sumRecursive(size, 0, arr)
    end

    def sumRecursive(n, sumSoFar, arr)

        if n == 1
            #Make sure it's in ascending order (or only level)
            if sum - sumSoFar >= arr[-2] and @domain.include?(sum - sumSoFar)
                final_arr=Array.new(arr)
                final_arr[(-1)] = sum - sumSoFar #put it in the n_th last index of arr
                @results<<final_arr
            end

        elsif n > 1

            #********* dom_selector ********

            n != size ? start = arr[(-1*n)-1] : start = domain[0]
            dom_bounds=(start*(n-1)..domain.last*(n-1))

            restricted_dom=domain.select do |x|

                if x < start 
                    false; next
                end

                if size-n > 0
                    if dom_bounds.cover? sum-(arr.first(size-n).inject(:+)+x) then true
                    else false end  
                else 
                    dom_bounds.cover?(sum+x) ? true : false
                end
            end # ***************************

            for i in restricted_dom
                _arr=Array.new(arr)
                _arr[(-1*n)] = i 
                sumRecursive(n-1, sumSoFar + i, _arr)
            end
        end
    end
end 

a=Domain_partition.new (-6..6),10,0 
p a

b=Domain_partition.new [-4,-2,-1,1,2,3],10,0 
p b
share|improve this answer

If you're interested in generating (lexically) ordered integer partitions, i.e. unique unordered sets of S positive integers (no 0's) that sum to N, then try the following. (unordered simply means that [1,2,1] and [1,1,2] are the same partition)

The problem doesn't need recursion and is quickly handled because the concept of finding the next lexical restricted partition is actually very simple...

In concept: Starting from the last addend (integer), find the first instance where the difference between two addends is greater than 1. Split the partition in two at that point. Remove 1 from the higher integer (which will be the last integer in one part) and add 1 to the lower integer (the first integer of the latter part). Then find the first lexically ordered partition for the latter part having the new largest integer as the maximum addend value. I use Sage to find the first lexical partition because it's lightening fast, but it's easily done without it. Finally, join the two portions and voila! You have the next lexical partition of N having S parts.

e.g. [6,5,3,2,2] -> [6,5],[3,2,2] -> [6,4],[4,2,2] -> [6,4],[4,3,1] -> [6,4,4,3,1]

So, in Python and calling Sage for the minor task of finding the first lexical partition given n and s parts...

from sage.all import *

def most_even_partition(n,s): # The main function will need to recognize the most even partition possible (i.e. last lexical partition) so it can loop back to the first lexical partition if need be
    most_even = [int(floor(float(n)/float(s)))]*s
    _remainder = int(n%s)

    j = 0
    while _remainder > 0:
        most_even[j] += 1
        _remainder -= 1
        j += 1
    return most_even

def portion(alist, indices): 
    return [alist[i:j] for i, j in zip([0]+indices, indices+[None])]


def next_restricted_part(p,n,s):
    if p == most_even_partition(n,s):return Partitions(n,length=s).first()

    for i in enumerate(reversed(p)):
        if i[1] - p[-1] > 1:
            if i[0] == (s-1):
                return Partitions(n,length=s,max_part=(i[1]-1)).first()
            else:
                parts = portion(p,[s-i[0]-1]) # split p (soup?)
                h1 = parts[0]
                h2 = parts[1]
                next = list(Partitions(sum(h2),length=len(h2),max_part=(h2[0]-1)).first())
                return h1+next

If you want zeros (not actual integer partitions), then the functions only need small modifications.

share|improve this answer

Try this code. I hope it is easier to understand. I tested it, it generate correct sequence.

void partition(int n, int m = 0)
{
    int i;
    // if the partition is done
    if(n == 0){
        // Output the result
        for(i = 0; i < m; ++i)
            printf("%d ", list[i]);
        printf("\n");
        return;
    }
    // Do the split from large to small int
    for(i = n; i > 0; --i){
        // if the number not partitioned or
        // willbe partitioned no larger than 
        // previous partition number
        if(m == 0 || i <= list[m - 1]){
            // store the partition int
            list[m] = i;
            // partition the rest
            partition(n - i, m + 1);
        }
    }
}

Ask for clarification, if required.

The is One of the output

6 
5 1 
4 2 
4 1 1 
3 3 
3 2 1 
3 1 1 1 
2 2 2 
2 2 1 1 
2 1 1 1 1 
1 1 1 1 1 1 


10 
9 1 
8 2 
8 1 1 
7 3 
7 2 1 
7 1 1 1 
6 4 
6 3 1 
6 2 2 
6 2 1 1 
6 1 1 1 1 
5 5 
5 4 1 
5 3 2 
5 3 1 1 
5 2 2 1 
5 2 1 1 1 
5 1 1 1 1 1 
4 4 2 
4 4 1 1 
4 3 3 
4 3 2 1 
4 3 1 1 1 
4 2 2 2 
4 2 2 1 1 
4 2 1 1 1 1 
4 1 1 1 1 1 1 
3 3 3 1 
3 3 2 2 
3 3 2 1 1 
3 3 1 1 1 1 
3 2 2 2 1 
3 2 2 1 1 1 
3 2 1 1 1 1 1 
3 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 
2 2 2 2 2 
2 2 2 2 1 1 
2 2 2 1 1 1 1 
2 2 1 1 1 1 1 1 
2 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 
1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 
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