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I'm trying to interpolate between two colours in HSV colour space to produce a smooth colour gradient.

I'm using a linear interpolation, eg:

h = (1 - p) * h1 + p * h2
s = (1 - p) * s1 + p * s2
v = (1 - p) * v1 + p * v2

(where p is the percentage, and h1, h2, s1, s2, v1, v2 are the hue, saturation and value components of the two colours)

This produces a good result for s and v but not for h. As the hue component is an angle, the calculation needs to work out the shortest distance between h1 and h2 and then do the interpolation in the right direction (either clockwise or anti-clockwise).

What formula or algorithm should I use?


EDIT: By following Jack's suggestions I modified my JavaScript gradient function and it works well. For anyone interested, here's what I ended up with:

// create gradient from yellow to red to black with 100 steps
var gradient = hsbGradient(100, [{h:0.14, s:0.5, b:1}, {h:0, s:1, b:1}, {h:0, s:1, b:0}]); 

function hsbGradient(steps, colours) {
  var parts = colours.length - 1;
  var gradient = new Array(steps);
  var gradientIndex = 0;
  var partSteps = Math.floor(steps / parts);
  var remainder = steps - (partSteps * parts);
  for (var col = 0; col < parts; col++) {
    // get colours
    var c1 = colours[col], 
        c2 = colours[col + 1];
    // determine clockwise and counter-clockwise distance between hues
    var distCCW = (c1.h >= c2.h) ? c1.h - c2.h : 1 + c1.h - c2.h;
        distCW = (c1.h >= c2.h) ? 1 + c2.h - c1.h : c2.h - c1.h;
     // ensure we get the right number of steps by adding remainder to final part
    if (col == parts - 1) partSteps += remainder; 
    // make gradient for this part
    for (var step = 0; step < partSteps; step ++) {
      var p = step / partSteps;
      // interpolate h, s, b
      var h = (distCW <= distCCW) ? c1.h + (distCW * p) : c1.h - (distCCW * p);
      if (h < 0) h = 1 + h;
      if (h > 1) h = h - 1;
      var s = (1 - p) * c1.s + p * c2.s;
      var b = (1 - p) * c1.b + p * c2.b;
      // add to gradient array
      gradient[gradientIndex] = {h:h, s:s, b:b};
      gradientIndex ++;
    }
  }
  return gradient;
}
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1  
is this homework? uio.no/studier/emner/matnat/ifi/INF3320/h08/… – Jack Apr 7 '10 at 16:02
    
Ha ha! No, it's not although I did read that exercise too and it did help me phrase this question :) I'm actually drawing charts with javascript and SVG and I need a way to generate nice gradients between any given list of hsv colours. I have it all working except for the hue interpolation. – nick Apr 7 '10 at 16:14
up vote 11 down vote accepted

You should just need to find out which is the shortest path from starting hue to ending hue. This can be done easily since hue values range from 0 to 255.

You can first subtract the lower hue from the higher one, then add 256 to the lower one to check again the difference with swapped operands.

int maxCCW = higherHue - lowerHue;
int maxCW = (lowerHue+256) - higherHue;

So you'll obtain two values, the greater one decides if you should go clockwise or counterclockwise. Then you'll have to find a way to make the interpolation operate on modulo 256 of the hue, so if you are interpolating from 246 to 20 if the coefficient is >= 0.5f you should reset hue to 0 (since it reaches 256 and hue = hue%256 in any case).

Actually if you don't care about hue while interpolating over the 0 but just apply modulo operator after calculating the new hue it should work anyway.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks Jack, that was a real help. I managed to get my code working. I'll edit my question to include the code I ended up with. Feel free to offer suggestions for improvements. – nick Apr 8 '10 at 10:31
    
One thing to note is that in the colour model I was using the hue values are all between 0 and 1 so I didn't use the modulo like you suggested. – nick Apr 8 '10 at 10:42

Although this answer is late, the accepted one is incorrect in stating that hue should be within [0, 255]; also more justice can be done with clearer explanation and code.

Hue is an angular value in the interval [0, 360); a full circle where 0 = 360. The HSV colour space is easier to visualize and is more intuitive to humans then RGB. HSV forms a cylinder from which a slice is shown in many colour pickers, while RGB is really a cube and isn't really a good choice for a colour picker; most ones which do use it would have to employ more sliders than required for a HSV picker.

The requirement when interpolating hue is that the smaller arc is chosen to reach from one hue to another. So given two hue values, there are four possibilities, given with example angles below:

Δ |  ≤ 180  |  > 180
--|---------|---------
+ |  40, 60 | 310, 10
− |  60, 40 | 10, 310

if Δ = 180 then both +/− rotation are valid options

Lets take + as counter-clockwise and as clockwise rotation. If the difference in absolute value exceeds 180 then normalize it by ± 360 to make sure the magnitude is within 180; this also reverses the direction, rightly.

var d = h2 - h1;
var delta = d + ((Math.abs(d) > 180) ? ((d < 0) ? 360 : -360) : 0);

Now just divide delta by the required number of steps to get the weight of each loop iteration to add to the start angle during interpolating.

var new_angle = start + (i * delta);

Relevant function excerpted from the complete code that follows:

function interpolate(h1, h2, steps) {
  var d = h2 - h1;
  var delta = (d + ((Math.abs(d) > 180) ? ((d < 0) ? 360 : -360) : 0)) / (steps + 1.0);
  var turns = [];
  for (var i = 1; d && i <= steps; ++i)
    turns.push(((h1 + (delta * i)) + 360) % 360);
  return turns;
}

"use strict";

function interpolate(h1, h2, steps) {
  var d = h2 - h1;
  var delta = (d + ((Math.abs(d) > 180) ? ((d < 0) ? 360 : -360) : 0)) / (steps + 1.0);
  var turns = [];
  for (var i = 1; d && i <= steps; ++i)
    turns.push(((h1 + (delta * i)) + 360) % 360);
  return turns;
}

function get_results(h1, h2, steps) {
  h1 = norm_angle(h1);
  h2 = norm_angle(h2);
  var r = "Start: " + h1 + "<br />";
  var turns = interpolate(h1, h2, steps);
  r += turns.length ? "Turn: " : "";
  r += turns.join("<br />Turn: ");
  r += (turns.length ? "<br />" : "") + "Stop: " + h2;
  return r;
}

function run() {
  var h1 = get_angle(document.getElementById('h1').value);
  var h2 = get_angle(document.getElementById('h2').value);
  var steps = get_num(document.getElementById('steps').value);
  var result = get_results(h1, h2, steps);

  document.getElementById('res').innerHTML = result;
}

function get_num(s) {
  var n = parseFloat(s);
  return (isNaN(n) || !isFinite(n)) ? 0 : n;
}

function get_angle(s) {
  return get_num(s) % 360;
}

function norm_angle(a) {
  a %= 360;
  a += (a < 0) ? 360 : 0;
  return a;
}
<h1 id="title">Hue Interpolation</h1>
Angle 1
<input type="text" id="h1" />
<br />Angle 2
<input type="text" id="h2" />
<br />
<br />Intermediate steps
<input type="text" id="steps" value="5" />
<br />
<br/>
<input type="submit" value="Run" onclick="run()" />
<p id="res"></p>

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