Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free.

How can I change the background color of a Tab Control. I changed the forms color, but the tabs stay the same.

Thanks.

share|improve this question
    
Please specify the language / environment you are using. –  JosephStyons Nov 3 '08 at 19:35
    
Yes, please, do that!!! –  Yarik Nov 4 '08 at 9:01

7 Answers 7

As far as I know, in Access 2000/2002/2003 it's impossible to change neither background, not foreground colors of the tabs.

So, if you want to change the appearance of entire tab control, I think you are out of luck.

However, if your real goal is to implement some sort of color-coding of a tab control's pages, here is what I did when I had this problem:

  • I placed a colored rectangle on each page of the tab control to provide different background colors for different pages.

  • As for tabs themselves. Fortunately they can contain images, so I created trivial image files, each of which was a small colored bullet (square, rectangle, circle - whatever looks nicer to you) and placed them on tabs, next to text labels.

Thus, the entire control still remained grey (or whatever is the current "button color" in the Windows's current theme), but each tab and each page got associated with whatever colors I needed them to have.

share|improve this answer

Check the Back Style of the Tab Control. If it's Normal. you'll get a gray background (with normal Windows settings). If it's Transparent then it will inherit the background colour of the form.

If you want it to be an entirely different colour, you might have to add a rectangle to the form (make the background non-transparent), maximise it within the tab and then set the colour of the rectangle.

As for the tabs them selves, I don't see a way of setting their colour independently.

share|improve this answer

CodeSlave made the very good suggestion:

If you want it to be an entirely different colour, you might have to add a rectangle to the form (make the background non-transparent), maximise it within the tab and then set the colour of the rectangle.

If you want to have a background that is larger in relation to the tab dimensions than the tab allows (there is a hard border that can't be exceeded), there is another solution (though it's somewhat more complicated -- which is what usually happens when you are tweaking appearance to not work the way your default environment is designed to work).

Set the tab control to transparent. Behind the tab, place a non-transparent box. Then in the OnChange event of the tab, change the background color of the box behind the tab.

Kinda messy, yes, but it allows you to have a background that is as large as the whole tab (or larger still, in the event that you might want items off the tab inside the same color field).

share|improve this answer

You can mock this up with a little code. Set the the Style property to None for the tab control and the use any other control that has a click event to create your own colourful tabs (you can even have images). Your code can either change tabs, or change the contents of a subform.

Change tab:

 Me.NameOfTabControlPage.SetFocus

Change subform control contents:

 Me.NameOfSubformControl.SourceObject = "NameOfSuitableForm"
share|improve this answer

With Access 2010, setting the color of the "Pressed Color" property in a tab control object allows you to set the background color of a tab page.

share|improve this answer

I have developed a subroutine to set the small rectangle at the right of the tabs to transparent. I tested it with Access 2003 and 2007.

Private Const GWL_EXSTYLE = -20
Private Const WS_EX_TRANSPARENT = &H20&

Private Declare Function GetWindowLong Lib "user32" Alias "GetWindowLongA" (ByVal hwnd As Long, ByVal nIndex As Long) As Long
Private Declare Function SetWindowLong Lib "user32" Alias "SetWindowLongA" (ByVal hwnd As Long, ByVal nIndex As Long, ByVal dwNewLong As Long) As Long
Private Declare Function FindWindowEx Lib "user32" Alias "FindWindowExA" (ByVal hWnd1 As Long, ByVal hWnd2 As Long, ByVal lpsz1 As String, ByVal lpsz2 As String) As Long

Public Sub PatchTabControl(ByVal f As Form)
   Dim hwnd As Long
   hwnd = FindWindowEx(f.hwnd, 0, "OFormSub", vbNullString)
   If hwnd = 0 Then Exit Sub
   hwnd = FindWindowEx(f.hwnd, hwnd, "OFormSub", vbNullString)
   If hwnd = 0 Then Exit Sub
   hwnd = FindWindowEx(hwnd, 0, "OTabControl", vbNullString)
   If hwnd = 0 Then Exit Sub
   SetWindowLong hwnd, GWL_EXSTYLE, GetWindowLong(hwnd, GWL_EXSTYLE) Or WS_EX_TRANSPARENT
   End Sub
share|improve this answer

Extending Duane Rochelle's helpful answer for Access 2010:

The problem seems to be that the names that Microsoft has given the properties that control the tab colours are contra-intuitive.

Basically, the color of the tabs can be controlled using the Pressed Color property. Look for it in the properties of the entire tab object, not the properties of individual tabs.

This means, setting Pressed Color to - for example - some kind of blue (say, #8EA3BD) makes all tabs blue. Since "pressed" means actually "the tab area is on top of the other tabs", this is more or less equivalent to colouring the tab area.

(For me personally, "Pressed Color" is a misleading name. Of all tabs in a tab object, one is visible by default, even without anybody having "pressed" a tab. A better name would be "Background color of visible tab".)

For the other elements of a tab object that one would like to paint:

For the colour of the text on the tab head (where you click to select the tab), use the Pressed Fore Color property.

For the background colour of tabs that are not visible (or "hidden behind the currently open tab"), use the Back Color property.

For text on the heads of hidden tabs, use the Fore Color property.

Accordingly, I would find the following names more intuitive:

  • Background color of visible tab (now "Pressed Color")

  • Text color of visible tab (now "Pressed Fore Color")

  • Background color of hidden tab (now "Back Color")

  • Text color of hidden tab (now "Fore Color")

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.