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There is some code that I'm trying to convert from IList to IEnumerable:

[Something(123)]
public IEnumerable<Foo> GetAllFoos()
{
  SetupSomething();

  DataReader dr = RunSomething();
  while (dr.Read())
  {
    yield return Factory.Create(dr);
  }
}

The problem is, SetupSomething() comes from the base class and uses:

Attribute.GetCustomAttribute(
    new StackTrace().GetFrame(1).GetMethod(), typeof(Something))

yield ends up creating MoveNext(), MoveNext() calls SetupSomething(), and MoveNext() does not have the [Something(123)] attribute.

I can't change the base class, so it appears I am forced to stay with IList or implement IEnumerable manually (and add the attribute to MoveNext()).

Is there any other way to make yield work in this scenario?

share|improve this question
up vote 1 down vote accepted

You can wrap the method in another method that does all required preprocessing:

[Something(123)]
public IEnumerable<Foo> GetAllFoos()
{
    SetupSomething();
    return GetAllFoosInternal();
}

private IEnumerable<Foo> GetAllFoosInternal()
{
    DataReader dr = RunSomething();
    while (dr.Read())
    {
        yield return Factory.Create(dr);
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
You're right. I checked RunSomething() and it does not appear to use the stack frame or attributes. It's too bad I would have to split it out like that. – Nelson Rothermel Apr 7 '10 at 17:36
    
I think in this specific case I'm going to avoid splitting it and keeping IList since I'm not dealing with large data sets. – Nelson Rothermel Apr 7 '10 at 17:43

You can't use iterators (yield) if you require the stack frame functionality. As you've discovered, this rewrites your method into a custom class that implements IEnumerable<T>.

However, you can easily just rework this to:

[Something(123)]
public IEnumerable<Foo> GetAllFoos()
{
  SetupSomething();

  List<Foo> results = new List<Foo>();
  DataReader dr = RunSomething();
  while (dr.Read())
  {
    results.Add(Factory.Create(dr));
  }
  return results;
}

You lose the deferred execution of the iterator, but it will work properly.

share|improve this answer
1  
Right, currently it's creating a list similar to what you have and I was trying to use deferred execution with IEnumerable/yield. – Nelson Rothermel Apr 7 '10 at 17:34
    
@Nelson: Then you either need to do this (better for maintainability) or split into 2 methods (better if deferred execution required), or implement yourself(I'd avoid - no real advantage) - unfortunately, those are the choices. – Reed Copsey Apr 7 '10 at 18:23

Could you split your method up, like this?

[Something(123)]
public void GetAllFoosHelper()
{
  SetupSomething(); 
}

public IEnumerable<Foo> GetAllFoos() 
{ 
  GetAllFoosHelper();

  DataReader dr = RunSomething(); 
  while (dr.Read()) 
  { 
    yield return Factory.Create(dr); 
  } 
} 
share|improve this answer
    
Yup, similar to dtb's example, just reversed. – Nelson Rothermel Apr 7 '10 at 17:39

From your description, it sounds like the problem is that SetupSomething is only looking at the immediate caller on the stack trace. If it looked a little further up (caller's caller) it would find your GetAllFocus call and the desired attribute.

I don't recall off the top of my head, but if yield is creating a MoveNext() implementation only because your class doesn't already implement it, perhaps you can implement your own MoveNext, put the attribute on it, and yield will find and use your MoveNext()? Just a wild guess.

share|improve this answer
    
You're probably right. If I implement MoveNext, then I would be implementing IEnumerable manually, which would greatly increase the amount of code. Valid, but not ideal in this case. – Nelson Rothermel Apr 7 '10 at 17:38
    
Generated methods like yield's MoveNext are becoming more common. You'll run into this problem again in the future. Too bad you can't do something to fix the root cause - the stack trace in SetupSomething. – dthorpe Apr 7 '10 at 18:13

I'm probably missing something, but I can't make sense of using an attribute here. You might as well have written it like this:

public IEnumerable<Foo> GetAllFoos()
{
  SetupSomething(123);
  // etc..
}

A whole heckofalot faster too. And safer, you're dead in the water when the JIT compiler inlines SetupSomething().

share|improve this answer
    
It's actually SetupSomething(params object[] values). However, it could still be SetupSomething(int foo, params object[] values). In this case, SetupSomething() always has to be called, even if there are no params, otherwise RunSomething() fails. I think it's a bad design, but it's what I have to work with. – Nelson Rothermel Apr 7 '10 at 18:39
    
I think I would actually prefer it more like this: SetupParams(params object[] values); RunSomething(int foo); Like I mentioned, SetupSomething() is required only because it reads the attribute, but the actual params are optional. RunSomething() fails if you haven't run SetupSomething() and read the attribute. Seems very backwards to me. – Nelson Rothermel Apr 7 '10 at 18:46

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