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It's easy to find duplicates with one field:

SELECT name, COUNT(email) 
FROM users
GROUP BY email
HAVING ( COUNT(email) > 1 )

So if we have a table

ID   NAME   EMAIL
1    John   asd@asd.com
2    Sam    asd@asd.com
3    Tom    asd@asd.com
4    Bob    bob@asd.com
5    Tom    asd@asd.com

This query will give us John, Sam, Tom, Tom because they all have the same email.

However, what I want is to get duplicates with the same email and name.

That is, I want to get "Tom", "Tom".

The reason I need this: I made a mistake, and allowed to insert duplicate name and email values. Now I need to remove/change the duplicates, so I need to find them first.

share|improve this question
4  
I don't think it would let you select name in your first sample since it's not in an aggregate function. "What is the count of matching email addresses and their name" is some tricky logic... – sXe Jan 4 '13 at 18:09

16 Answers 16

up vote 980 down vote accepted
SELECT
    name, email, COUNT(*)
FROM
    users
GROUP BY
    name, email
HAVING 
    COUNT(*) > 1

Simply group on the both columns

Note: the ANSI standard is to have all non aggregated columns in the GROUP BY.

MySQL allows you to avoid this, but results are unpredictable:

share|improve this answer
3  
The part I always blank on is HAVING. WHERE doesn't work! – webXL Mar 18 '13 at 19:22
13  
@webXL WHERE works with single record HAVING works with group – bjan Apr 11 '13 at 4:27
3  
@gbn Is it possible to include the Id in the results? Then it would be easier to delete those duplicates afterwards. – user797717 Jun 10 '14 at 9:36
5  
@user797717: you'd need to have MIN(ID) and then delete for ID values not in the last if MIN(ID) values – gbn Jun 10 '14 at 9:59
1  
@gbn Perfect. Thanks. I can see now the ID's. – user797717 Jun 10 '14 at 10:35

try this:

declare @YourTable table (id int, name varchar(10), email varchar(50))

INSERT @YourTable VALUES (1,'John','John-email')
INSERT @YourTable VALUES (2,'John','John-email')
INSERT @YourTable VALUES (3,'fred','John-email')
INSERT @YourTable VALUES (4,'fred','fred-email')
INSERT @YourTable VALUES (5,'sam','sam-email')
INSERT @YourTable VALUES (6,'sam','sam-email')

SELECT
    name,email, COUNT(*) AS CountOf
    FROM @YourTable
    GROUP BY name,email
    HAVING COUNT(*)>1

OUTPUT:

name       email       CountOf
---------- ----------- -----------
John       John-email  2
sam        sam-email   2

(2 row(s) affected)

if you want the IDs of the dups use this:

SELECT
    y.id,y.name,y.email
    FROM @YourTable y
        INNER JOIN (SELECT
                        name,email, COUNT(*) AS CountOf
                        FROM @YourTable
                        GROUP BY name,email
                        HAVING COUNT(*)>1
                    ) dt ON y.name=dt.name and y.email=dt.email

OUTPUT:

id          name       email
----------- ---------- ------------
1           John       John-email
2           John       John-email
5           sam        sam-email
6           sam        sam-email

(4 row(s) affected)

to delete the duplicates try:

DELETE d
    FROM @YourTable d
        INNER JOIN (SELECT
                        y.id,y.name,y.email,ROW_NUMBER() OVER(PARTITION BY y.name,y.email ORDER BY y.name,y.email,y.id) AS RowRank
                        FROM @YourTable y
                            INNER JOIN (SELECT
                                            name,email, COUNT(*) AS CountOf
                                            FROM @YourTable
                                            GROUP BY name,email
                                            HAVING COUNT(*)>1
                                        ) dt ON y.name=dt.name and y.email=dt.email
                   ) dt2 ON d.id=dt2.id
        WHERE dt2.RowRank!=1
select * FROM @YourTable

OUTPUT:

id          name       email
----------- ---------- --------------
1           John       John-email
3           fred       John-email
4           fred       fred-email
5           sam        sam-email

(4 row(s) affected)
share|improve this answer
2  
Thanks for delete query. – retif Apr 9 '15 at 9:50
3  
Good job on the answer; I think this is much more thorough than the accepted one. – OzBarry Apr 16 '15 at 12:08
4  
a down vote, over 5 years after answering with over 100 up votes and no comment as to what is wrong?? thanks! – KM. Dec 30 '15 at 15:53

Try this:

SELECT name, email
FROM users
GROUP BY name, email
HAVING ( COUNT(*) > 1 )
share|improve this answer

Try the following:

SELECT * FROM
(
    SELECT Id, Name, Age, Comments, Row_Number() OVER(PARTITION BY Name, Age ORDER By Name)
        AS Rank 
        FROM Customers
) AS B WHERE Rank>1
share|improve this answer

In case you work with Oracle, this way would be preferable:

create table my_users(id number, name varchar2(100), email varchar2(100));

insert into my_users values (1, 'John', 'asd@asd.com');
insert into my_users values (2, 'Sam', 'asd@asd.com');
insert into my_users values (3, 'Tom', 'asd@asd.com');
insert into my_users values (4, 'Bob', 'bob@asd.com');
insert into my_users values (5, 'Tom', 'asd@asd.com');

commit;

select *
  from my_users
 where rowid not in (select min(rowid) from my_users group by name, email);
share|improve this answer

A little late to the party but I found a really cool workaround to finding all duplicate IDs:

SELECT GROUP_CONCAT( id )
FROM users
GROUP BY email
HAVING ( COUNT(email) > 1 )
share|improve this answer
    
Appears to be a syntactical sugar work around. Nice find. – Chef_Code Jan 31 at 20:36

try this code

WITH CTE AS

( SELECT Id, Name, Age, Comments, RN = ROW_NUMBER()OVER(PARTITION BY Name,Age ORDER BY ccn)
FROM ccnmaster )
select * from CTE
delete CTE WHERE RN > 1
share|improve this answer
 SELECT name, email 
    FROM users
    WHERE email in
    (SELECT email FROM users
    GROUP BY email 
    HAVING COUNT(*)>1)
share|improve this answer

If you wish to see if there is any duplicate rows in your table, I used below Query:

create table my_table(id int, name varchar(100), email varchar(100));

insert into my_table values (1, 'shekh', 'shekh@rms.com');
insert into my_table values (1, 'shekh', 'shekh@rms.com');
insert into my_table values (2, 'Aman', 'aman@rms.com');
insert into my_table values (3, 'Tom', 'tom@rms.com');
insert into my_table values (4, 'Raj', 'raj@rms.com');


Select COUNT(1) As Total_Rows from my_table 
Select Count(1) As Distinct_Rows from ( Select Distinct * from my_table) abc 
share|improve this answer

How we can count the duplicated values?? either it is repeated 2 times or greater than 2. just count them, not group wise.

as simple as

select COUNT(distinct col_01) from Table_01
share|improve this answer
    
How would this work for the question as asked? This does not give rows that duplicate information in multiple columns (e.g. "email" and "name") in different rows. – Jeroen May 8 '15 at 7:18

If you want to delete the duplicates, here's a much simpler way to do it than having to find even/odd rows into a triple sub-select:

SELECT id, name, email 
FROM users u, users u2
WHERE u.id <> u2.id AND u.name = u2.name AND u.email = u2.email
    AND u.id > u2.id

And so to delete:

DELETE FROM users
WHERE id IN (
    SELECT id/*, name, email*/
    FROM users u, users u2
    WHERE u.id <> u2.id AND u.name = u2.name AND u.email = u2.email
       AND u.id > u2.id
)

Much more easier to read and understand IMHO

Note: The only perks is that you have to execute the request until there is no rows deleted, since you delete only 1 of each duplicate each time

share|improve this answer
    
Nice and easy to read; I'd like to find a way that deleted multiple duplicate rows in one go though. – Dickon Reed Apr 9 at 5:29

If you want to find duplicate data (by one or several criterias) and select the actual rows.

with MYCTE as (
    SELECT DuplicateKey1
        ,DuplicateKey2 --optional
        ,count(*) X
    FROM MyTable
    group by DuplicateKey1, DuplicateKey2
    having count(*) > 1
) 
SELECT E.*
FROM MyTable E
JOIN MYCTE cte
ON E.DuplicateKey1=cte.DuplicateKey1
    AND E.DuplicateKey2=cte.DuplicateKey2
ORDER BY E.DuplicateKey1, E.DuplicateKey2, CreatedAt

http://developer.azurewebsites.net/2014/09/better-sql-group-by-find-duplicate-data/

share|improve this answer
1  
accepted answer is already much simpler ;) – kneidels Jan 1 '15 at 14:47

This should also work, maybe give it try.

  Select * from Users a
            where EXISTS (Select * from Users b 
                where (     a.name = b.name 
                        OR  a.email = b.email)
                     and a.ID != b.id)

Especially good in your case If you search for duplicates who have some kind of prefix or general change like e.g. new domain in mail. then you can use replace() at these columns

share|improve this answer
 select emp.ename, emp.empno, dept.loc 
          from emp
 inner join dept 
          on dept.deptno=emp.deptno
 inner join
    (select ename, count(*) from
    emp
    group by ename, deptno
    having count(*) > 1)
 t on emp.ename=t.ename order by emp.ename
/
share|improve this answer
SELECT
  FirstName, LastName, MobileNo, COUNT(1) as CNT 
FROM        
  CUSTOMER
GROUP BY
  FirstName, LastName, MobileNo 
HAVING
  COUNT(1) > 1;
share|improve this answer
5  
Isn't this just about the same as the top answer? – Jeroen May 8 '15 at 7:16

SELECT id, COUNT(id) FROM table1 GROUP BY id HAVING COUNT(id)>1;

I think this will work properly to search repeated values in a particular column.

share|improve this answer
4  
This doesn't quite add anything to the top answer, and technically doesn't even really differ from the code OP's posted in the question. – Jeroen May 8 '15 at 7:14

protected by Lalit Kumar B Jul 22 '15 at 8:55

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