Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I'm writing an algorithm that iterates over a list of points, calculates the distance between them and inserts additional points if the distance is too great. However I seem to be lacking the proper familiarity with STL to come up with an elegant solution. I'm hoping that I can learn something, so I'll just show you my code. You might have some hints for me.

for (std::list<PathPoint>::iterator it = ++points_.begin();
     it != points_.end(); it++)
{
    Vector curPos = it->getPosition();
    Vector prevPos = (--it)->getPosition();
    Vector vecFromPrev = curPos - prevPos;
    float distance = vecFromPrev.abs();
    it++;
    if (distance > MAX_DISTANCE_BETWEEN_POINTS)
    {               
        int pointsToInsert = (int)(distance / MAX_DISTANCE_BETWEEN_POINTS);             
        Vector curPos = prevPos;                
        for (int i = 0; i < pointsToInsert; i++)
        {
            curPos += vecFromPrev / pointsToInsert;
            it = points_.insert(it, PathPoint(curPos, false));
            it++;
        }
    }
}
share|improve this question
    
Looks good to me. Though I'd do something to make it clear that Vector is not std::vector<t>. –  Billy ONeal Apr 7 '10 at 20:22
1  
You are incrementing it twice without checking it valid. –  Kirill V. Lyadvinsky Apr 7 '10 at 20:46
    
Actually I'm not. Inside of the loop my iterator will always point on a valid list element. However the movement of the iterator is kinda wild, which is one of the reasons I'm not really satisfied with my code. –  Marvin Killing Apr 7 '10 at 20:56
    
You do incriment once without knowing its valid, in the loop definition. If your list is empty, ++points_.begin() blows up. –  Dennis Zickefoose Apr 7 '10 at 22:23
add comment

5 Answers

up vote 6 down vote accepted

Consider using adjacent_find to find an iterator position where the distance between consecutive elements is too large, then inserting pointsToInsert items.

http://www.sgi.com/tech/stl/adjacent_find.html

In addition, you could use generate with a functor to fill in the intermediate points.

http://www.sgi.com/tech/stl/generate.html

Not sure how deep you want to go into STL :)

share|improve this answer
    
As far as I can. Great answer, thanks! –  Marvin Killing Apr 7 '10 at 20:57
1  
Good way to learn but using stl extensively can give quite unreadable code unless the reader is very familiar with stl. –  Zitrax Apr 7 '10 at 21:34
1  
Badly written code is hard to read no matter what methods you employ. –  Dennis Zickefoose Apr 7 '10 at 22:38
add comment

You're iterative solution is perfectly understandable. I know when you say "I'm hoping that I can learn something" this is not what you intended, but what I hope you learn is:

1) There is no benefit to finding an "elegant" functional solution to a problem you have solved iteratively in a fine way

2) Functional programming in C++ is tedious, even more so than C++ is already tedious.

share|improve this answer
add comment

I don't like mentioning the iterator types because 1.) they're kind of ugly and 2.) it reduces the changes I have to make if I change collection types, so I would probably do something like this....

I made a couple additional tweaks that are probably more my personal style than idiomatic.

this->addAdditionalPoints(points.begin(), points.end());


template<typename InIt>
void MyClass::addAdditionalPoints(InIt start, InIt finish)
{
   InIt it = start;
   ++it;                                      // Starting with second element
   for (; it != finish; ++it)  // I usually pre-increment iterators, but 
                                             // it probably doesn't matter.
   {
      InIt curr = it;                       // Work with a temp rather than loop index
      Vector curPos = curr->getPosition();
      Vector prevPos = (--curr)->getPosition();
      Vector vecFromPrev = curPos - prevPos;
      float distance = vecFromPrev.abs();
      ++curr;                             // Prefer to pre-increment iterators
      if (distance > MAX_DISTANCE_BETWEEN_POINTS)
      {               
          int pointsToInsert = static_cast<int>(distance /              
              MAX_DISTANCE_BETWEEN_POINTS);  // I prefer C++-style casts     
          Vector curPos = prevPos;                
          for (int i = 0; i < pointsToInsert; i++)
          {
              curPos += vecFromPrev / pointsToInsert;
              curr = points_.insert(curr, PathPoint(curPos, false));
              ++curr;  // Again I prefer to pre-increment iterators
          }
      }
   }
}
share|improve this answer
add comment

You don't have to catch the return value of the list insert to the iterator. That way, you don't need to manually increment it.

for (int i = 0; i < pointsToInsert; i++)
{
    curPos += vecFromPrev / pointsToInsert;
    points_.insert(it, PathPoint(curPos, false));
}
share|improve this answer
add comment

Stephen's solution is a good one, but in the interest of education, you can loop over two variables at once:

typedef typename std::list<PathPoint>::iterator Itr; //Pointless, but just to illustrate the possibility
for(Itr cur = points_.begin(), prev = cur++; cur != points_.end(); ++prev, ++cur) {
    Vector curPos = cur->getPosition();
    Vector prevPos = prev->getPosition();
    Vector vecFromPrev = curPos - prevPos;
    float distance = vecFromPrev.abs();
    if (distance > MAX_DISTANCE_BETWEEN_POINTS) {               
        int pointsToInsert = (int)(distance / MAX_DISTANCE_BETWEEN_POINTS);             
        Vector curPos = prevPos;                
        for (int i = 0; i < pointsToInsert; i++) {
            curPos += vecFromPrev / pointsToInsert;
            prev = points_.insert(cur, PathPoint(curPos, false));
            //as somebody mentioned, `cur` remains valid during `list` insertions
        }
    }
}

Moving your iterator back and forth like that is somewhat confusing. Also, note that neither this, nor your original code, like empty lists very much.

share|improve this answer
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.