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If my table looks like this:

CREATE TABLE `daily_individual_tracking` (
  `daily_individual_tracking_id` int(10) unsigned NOT NULL auto_increment,
  `daily_individual_tracking_date` date NOT NULL default ''0000-00-00'',
  `sales` enum(''no'',''yes'') NOT NULL COMMENT ''no'',
  `repairs` enum(''no'',''yes'') NOT NULL COMMENT ''no'',
  `shipping` enum(''no'',''yes'') NOT NULL COMMENT ''no'',
  PRIMARY KEY  (`daily_individual_tracking_id`)
) ENGINE=InnoDB AUTO_INCREMENT=4 DEFAULT CHARSET=latin1

basically the fields can be either yes or no.

How can I count how many yes's their are for each column over a date range?

Thanks!!

share|improve this question
    
enum columns are nasty when you have a large dataset and need to add a new enum type. Depending on the schema it can take up to 45 minutes to update a table with new enum type, you may want to consider a linking (pivot) table. In your specific example, you may also want to consider a boolean column type, as it is int based vs text based and will be much faster. – Mike Purcell Dec 5 '11 at 21:13
up vote 7 down vote accepted

You can either run three queries like this:

SELECT COUNT(*)
FROM daily_individual_tracking
WHERE sales = 'YES'
AND daily_individual_tracking_date BETWEEN '2010-01-01' AND '2010-03-31' 

Or if you want you can get all three at once like this:

SELECT (
    SELECT COUNT(*)
    FROM daily_individual_tracking
    WHERE sales = 'YES'
    AND daily_individual_tracking_date BETWEEN '2010-01-01' AND '2010-03-31'
) AS sales_count, (
    SELECT COUNT(*)
    FROM daily_individual_tracking
    WHERE repairs = 'YES'
    AND daily_individual_tracking_date BETWEEN '2010-01-01' AND '2010-03-31'
) AS repairs_count, (
    SELECT COUNT(*)
    FROM daily_individual_tracking
    WHERE shipping = 'YES'
    AND daily_individual_tracking_date BETWEEN '2010-01-01' AND '2010-03-31'
) AS shipping_count

Another way to do it is to use SUM instead of COUNT. You could try this too to see how it affects the performance:

SELECT
    SUM(sales = 'YES') AS sales_count,
    SUM(repairs = 'YES') AS repairs_count,
    SUM(shipping = 'YES') AS shipping_count
FROM daily_individual_tracking
WHERE daily_individual_tracking_date BETWEEN '2010-01-01' AND '2010-03-31'
share|improve this answer
    
I see, so do I need a to run a different query for each: sales, repairs, shipping? Thanks!! – JD Isaacks Apr 7 '10 at 20:46
    
@John: You can do it in one query if you want. I've given you a couple more options you could try. – Mark Byers Apr 7 '10 at 20:52
    
Thanks :) I will accept your answer, but it says I have to wait 3 more minutes (a new SO feature I guess) – JD Isaacks Apr 7 '10 at 20:53

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