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phpass is a widely used hashing 'framework'.
Is it good practice to salt the plain password before giving it to PasswordHash (v0.2), like so?:

$dynamicSalt   = $record['salt'];
$staticSalt    = 'i5ininsfj5lt4hbfduk54fjbhoxc80sdf';
$plainPassword = $_POST['password'];
$password      = $plainPassword . $dynamicSalt . $staticSalt;

$passwordHash = new PasswordHash(8, false);
$storedPassword = $passwordHash->HashPassword($password);  

For reference the phpsalt class:

# Portable PHP password hashing framework.
#
# Version 0.2 / genuine.
#
# Written by Solar Designer <solar at openwall.com> in 2004-2006 and placed in
# the public domain.
#
#
#
class PasswordHash {
    var $itoa64;
    var $iteration_count_log2;
    var $portable_hashes;
    var $random_state;

    function PasswordHash($iteration_count_log2, $portable_hashes)
    {
        $this->itoa64 = './0123456789ABCDEFGHIJKLMNOPQRSTUVWXYZabcdefghijklmnopqrstuvwxyz';

        if ($iteration_count_log2 < 4 || $iteration_count_log2 > 31)
            $iteration_count_log2 = 8;
        $this->iteration_count_log2 = $iteration_count_log2;

        $this->portable_hashes = $portable_hashes;

        $this->random_state = microtime() . getmypid();
    }

    function get_random_bytes($count)
    {
        $output = '';
        if (is_readable('/dev/urandom') &&
            ($fh = @fopen('/dev/urandom', 'rb'))) {
            $output = fread($fh, $count);
            fclose($fh);
        }

        if (strlen($output) < $count) {
            $output = '';
            for ($i = 0; $i < $count; $i += 16) {
                $this->random_state =
                    md5(microtime() . $this->random_state);
                $output .=
                    pack('H*', md5($this->random_state));
            }
            $output = substr($output, 0, $count);
        }

        return $output;
    }

    function encode64($input, $count)
    {
        $output = '';
        $i = 0;
        do {
            $value = ord($input[$i++]);
            $output .= $this->itoa64[$value & 0x3f];
            if ($i < $count)
                $value |= ord($input[$i]) << 8;
            $output .= $this->itoa64[($value >> 6) & 0x3f];
            if ($i++ >= $count)
                break;
            if ($i < $count)
                $value |= ord($input[$i]) << 16;
            $output .= $this->itoa64[($value >> 12) & 0x3f];
            if ($i++ >= $count)
                break;
            $output .= $this->itoa64[($value >> 18) & 0x3f];
        } while ($i < $count);

        return $output;
    }

    function gensalt_private($input)
    {
        $output = '$P$';
        $output .= $this->itoa64[min($this->iteration_count_log2 +
            ((PHP_VERSION >= '5') ? 5 : 3), 30)];
        $output .= $this->encode64($input, 6);

        return $output;
    }

    function crypt_private($password, $setting)
    {
        $output = '*0';
        if (substr($setting, 0, 2) == $output)
            $output = '*1';

        if (substr($setting, 0, 3) != '$P$')
            return $output;

        $count_log2 = strpos($this->itoa64, $setting[3]);
        if ($count_log2 < 7 || $count_log2 > 30)
            return $output;

        $count = 1 << $count_log2;

        $salt = substr($setting, 4, 8);
        if (strlen($salt) != 8)
            return $output;

        # We're kind of forced to use MD5 here since it's the only
        # cryptographic primitive available in all versions of PHP
        # currently in use.  To implement our own low-level crypto
        # in PHP would result in much worse performance and
        # consequently in lower iteration counts and hashes that are
        # quicker to crack (by non-PHP code).
        if (PHP_VERSION >= '5') {
            $hash = md5($salt . $password, TRUE);
            do {
                $hash = md5($hash . $password, TRUE);
            } while (--$count);
        } else {
            $hash = pack('H*', md5($salt . $password));
            do {
                $hash = pack('H*', md5($hash . $password));
            } while (--$count);
        }

        $output = substr($setting, 0, 12);
        $output .= $this->encode64($hash, 16);

        return $output;
    }

    function gensalt_extended($input)
    {
        $count_log2 = min($this->iteration_count_log2 + 8, 24);
        # This should be odd to not reveal weak DES keys, and the
        # maximum valid value is (2**24 - 1) which is odd anyway.
        $count = (1 << $count_log2) - 1;

        $output = '_';
        $output .= $this->itoa64[$count & 0x3f];
        $output .= $this->itoa64[($count >> 6) & 0x3f];
        $output .= $this->itoa64[($count >> 12) & 0x3f];
        $output .= $this->itoa64[($count >> 18) & 0x3f];

        $output .= $this->encode64($input, 3);

        return $output;
    }

    function gensalt_blowfish($input)
    {
        # This one needs to use a different order of characters and a
        # different encoding scheme from the one in encode64() above.
        # We care because the last character in our encoded string will
        # only represent 2 bits.  While two known implementations of
        # bcrypt will happily accept and correct a salt string which
        # has the 4 unused bits set to non-zero, we do not want to take
        # chances and we also do not want to waste an additional byte
        # of entropy.
        $itoa64 = './ABCDEFGHIJKLMNOPQRSTUVWXYZabcdefghijklmnopqrstuvwxyz0123456789';

        $output = '$2a$';
        $output .= chr(ord('0') + $this->iteration_count_log2 / 10);
        $output .= chr(ord('0') + $this->iteration_count_log2 % 10);
        $output .= '$';

        $i = 0;
        do {
            $c1 = ord($input[$i++]);
            $output .= $itoa64[$c1 >> 2];
            $c1 = ($c1 & 0x03) << 4;
            if ($i >= 16) {
                $output .= $itoa64[$c1];
                break;
            }

            $c2 = ord($input[$i++]);
            $c1 |= $c2 >> 4;
            $output .= $itoa64[$c1];
            $c1 = ($c2 & 0x0f) << 2;

            $c2 = ord($input[$i++]);
            $c1 |= $c2 >> 6;
            $output .= $itoa64[$c1];
            $output .= $itoa64[$c2 & 0x3f];
        } while (1);

        return $output;
    }

    function HashPassword($password)
    {
        $random = '';

        if (CRYPT_BLOWFISH == 1 && !$this->portable_hashes) {
            $random = $this->get_random_bytes(16);
            $hash =
                crypt($password, $this->gensalt_blowfish($random));
            if (strlen($hash) == 60)
                return $hash;
        }

        if (CRYPT_EXT_DES == 1 && !$this->portable_hashes) {
            if (strlen($random) < 3)
                $random = $this->get_random_bytes(3);
            $hash =
                crypt($password, $this->gensalt_extended($random));
            if (strlen($hash) == 20)
                return $hash;
        }

        if (strlen($random) < 6)
            $random = $this->get_random_bytes(6);
        $hash =
            $this->crypt_private($password,
            $this->gensalt_private($random));
        if (strlen($hash) == 34)
            return $hash;

        # Returning '*' on error is safe here, but would _not_ be safe
        # in a crypt(3)-like function used _both_ for generating new
        # hashes and for validating passwords against existing hashes.
        return '*';
    }

    function CheckPassword($password, $stored_hash)
    {
        $hash = $this->crypt_private($password, $stored_hash);
        if ($hash[0] == '*')
            $hash = crypt($password, $stored_hash);

        return $hash == $stored_hash;
    }
}
share|improve this question
up vote 30 down vote accepted
+50

This is an answer from the original author himself:

Besides the actual hashing, phpass transparently generates random salts when a new password or passphrase is hashed, and it encodes the hash type, the salt, and the password stretching iteration count into the "hash encoding string" that it returns. When phpass authenticates a password or passphrase against a stored hash, it similarly transparently extracts and uses the hash type identifier, the salt, and the iteration count out of the "hash encoding string". Thus, you do not need to bother with salting and stretching on your own - phpass takes care of these for you.

Bottom line: it doesn't make sense to salt your password before "phpassing".

share|improve this answer

You don't really need two salts (i.e. the static salt is redundant; the dynamic salt is plenty) - the main purpose of a salt is to prevent rainbow-table attacks if the hashes are ever acquired by a malicious party, and the reason for dynamic salts is to further prevent special-case rainbow table generation from breaking all passwords simultaneously.

Aside from that though, it can't hurt to salt regardless of whether or not the library has salting built in (though unless you're passing it more info than just the item to be hashed, it doesn't really have anything to use as a dynamic salt, so chances are it doesn't salt for you if it's not already obvious that it does).

share|improve this answer
    
(though unless you're passing it more info than just the item to be hashed, it doesn't really have anything to use as a dynamic salt, so chances are it doesn't salt for you if it's not already obvious that it does). I am still trying to parse this sentence… :) Could you explain what you mean? – Exception e Apr 7 '10 at 23:14
    
A double salt can be legitimate in some cases. For instance if you are worried that one of the salts maybe obtained by an attacker. For example if 1 salt is stored int he database then it could be obtained with sql injection, another salt could be stored in a flat file which is more difficult to obtain. A password hash cannot be broken until all salts are obtained, once the salts are obtained its trivial to break using a dictionary attack such as John the Ripper. – rook Apr 7 '10 at 23:26
    
@Exception: assuming you want the benefit of a dynamic salt, you need some piece of info that's unrelated to the item actually being hashed, but which is stored for when you want to hash again to compare. @TheRook, salts aren't meant to be hidden items. If someone can get the hash in the first place, then really trying to hide the salt isn't going to buy you much; you should have just hid the hash better. Keep in mind that if someone can read your code to know how they should be incorporating the salt in the first place, they can read any flat file. – Amber Apr 8 '10 at 7:09
    
I was thinking of a pseudo-random token obtained by md5(uniqid). Makes sense, no? – Exception e Apr 8 '10 at 8:19
    
Yes, I just meant that at least from what I can tell, the library doesn't have a place for you to pass that, which means you need to add it in yourself. :) – Amber Apr 9 '10 at 7:54

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