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phpass is a widely used hashing 'framework'. While evaluating phpass' HashPassword I came across this odd method fragment.

 function HashPassword($password)
    {
        // <snip> trying to generate a hash…

        # Returning '*' on error is safe here, but would _not_ be safe
        # in a crypt(3)-like function used _both_ for generating new
        # hashes and for validating passwords against existing hashes.
        return '*';
    }

Answer: we agree this class assumes that we test our hash for equality on * as a means of validating. This is why I will wrap this class, because it's interface is not great. I expect false in case of failure.


This is the complete phpsalt class:

# Portable PHP password hashing framework.
#
# Version 0.2 / genuine.
#
# Written by Solar Designer <solar at openwall.com> in 2004-2006 and placed in
# the public domain.
#
#
#
class PasswordHash {
    var $itoa64;
    var $iteration_count_log2;
    var $portable_hashes;
    var $random_state;

    function PasswordHash($iteration_count_log2, $portable_hashes)
    {
        $this->itoa64 = './0123456789ABCDEFGHIJKLMNOPQRSTUVWXYZabcdefghijklmnopqrstuvwxyz';

        if ($iteration_count_log2 < 4 || $iteration_count_log2 > 31)
            $iteration_count_log2 = 8;
        $this->iteration_count_log2 = $iteration_count_log2;

        $this->portable_hashes = $portable_hashes;

        $this->random_state = microtime() . getmypid();
    }

    function get_random_bytes($count)
    {
        $output = '';
        if (is_readable('/dev/urandom') &&
            ($fh = @fopen('/dev/urandom', 'rb'))) {
            $output = fread($fh, $count);
            fclose($fh);
        }

        if (strlen($output) < $count) {
            $output = '';
            for ($i = 0; $i < $count; $i += 16) {
                $this->random_state =
                    md5(microtime() . $this->random_state);
                $output .=
                    pack('H*', md5($this->random_state));
            }
            $output = substr($output, 0, $count);
        }

        return $output;
    }

    function encode64($input, $count)
    {
        $output = '';
        $i = 0;
        do {
            $value = ord($input[$i++]);
            $output .= $this->itoa64[$value & 0x3f];
            if ($i < $count)
                $value |= ord($input[$i]) << 8;
            $output .= $this->itoa64[($value >> 6) & 0x3f];
            if ($i++ >= $count)
                break;
            if ($i < $count)
                $value |= ord($input[$i]) << 16;
            $output .= $this->itoa64[($value >> 12) & 0x3f];
            if ($i++ >= $count)
                break;
            $output .= $this->itoa64[($value >> 18) & 0x3f];
        } while ($i < $count);

        return $output;
    }

    function gensalt_private($input)
    {
        $output = '$P$';
        $output .= $this->itoa64[min($this->iteration_count_log2 +
            ((PHP_VERSION >= '5') ? 5 : 3), 30)];
        $output .= $this->encode64($input, 6);

        return $output;
    }

    function crypt_private($password, $setting)
    {
        $output = '*0';
        if (substr($setting, 0, 2) == $output)
            $output = '*1';

        if (substr($setting, 0, 3) != '$P$')
            return $output;

        $count_log2 = strpos($this->itoa64, $setting[3]);
        if ($count_log2 < 7 || $count_log2 > 30)
            return $output;

        $count = 1 << $count_log2;

        $salt = substr($setting, 4, 8);
        if (strlen($salt) != 8)
            return $output;

        # We're kind of forced to use MD5 here since it's the only
        # cryptographic primitive available in all versions of PHP
        # currently in use.  To implement our own low-level crypto
        # in PHP would result in much worse performance and
        # consequently in lower iteration counts and hashes that are
        # quicker to crack (by non-PHP code).
        if (PHP_VERSION >= '5') {
            $hash = md5($salt . $password, TRUE);
            do {
                $hash = md5($hash . $password, TRUE);
            } while (--$count);
        } else {
            $hash = pack('H*', md5($salt . $password));
            do {
                $hash = pack('H*', md5($hash . $password));
            } while (--$count);
        }

        $output = substr($setting, 0, 12);
        $output .= $this->encode64($hash, 16);

        return $output;
    }

    function gensalt_extended($input)
    {
        $count_log2 = min($this->iteration_count_log2 + 8, 24);
        # This should be odd to not reveal weak DES keys, and the
        # maximum valid value is (2**24 - 1) which is odd anyway.
        $count = (1 << $count_log2) - 1;

        $output = '_';
        $output .= $this->itoa64[$count & 0x3f];
        $output .= $this->itoa64[($count >> 6) & 0x3f];
        $output .= $this->itoa64[($count >> 12) & 0x3f];
        $output .= $this->itoa64[($count >> 18) & 0x3f];

        $output .= $this->encode64($input, 3);

        return $output;
    }

    function gensalt_blowfish($input)
    {
        # This one needs to use a different order of characters and a
        # different encoding scheme from the one in encode64() above.
        # We care because the last character in our encoded string will
        # only represent 2 bits.  While two known implementations of
        # bcrypt will happily accept and correct a salt string which
        # has the 4 unused bits set to non-zero, we do not want to take
        # chances and we also do not want to waste an additional byte
        # of entropy.
        $itoa64 = './ABCDEFGHIJKLMNOPQRSTUVWXYZabcdefghijklmnopqrstuvwxyz0123456789';

        $output = '$2a$';
        $output .= chr(ord('0') + $this->iteration_count_log2 / 10);
        $output .= chr(ord('0') + $this->iteration_count_log2 % 10);
        $output .= '$';

        $i = 0;
        do {
            $c1 = ord($input[$i++]);
            $output .= $itoa64[$c1 >> 2];
            $c1 = ($c1 & 0x03) << 4;
            if ($i >= 16) {
                $output .= $itoa64[$c1];
                break;
            }

            $c2 = ord($input[$i++]);
            $c1 |= $c2 >> 4;
            $output .= $itoa64[$c1];
            $c1 = ($c2 & 0x0f) << 2;

            $c2 = ord($input[$i++]);
            $c1 |= $c2 >> 6;
            $output .= $itoa64[$c1];
            $output .= $itoa64[$c2 & 0x3f];
        } while (1);

        return $output;
    }

    function HashPassword($password)
    {
        $random = '';

        if (CRYPT_BLOWFISH == 1 && !$this->portable_hashes) {
            $random = $this->get_random_bytes(16);
            $hash =
                crypt($password, $this->gensalt_blowfish($random));
            if (strlen($hash) == 60)
                return $hash;
        }

        if (CRYPT_EXT_DES == 1 && !$this->portable_hashes) {
            if (strlen($random) < 3)
                $random = $this->get_random_bytes(3);
            $hash =
                crypt($password, $this->gensalt_extended($random));
            if (strlen($hash) == 20)
                return $hash;
        }

        if (strlen($random) < 6)
            $random = $this->get_random_bytes(6);
        $hash =
            $this->crypt_private($password,
            $this->gensalt_private($random));
        if (strlen($hash) == 34)
            return $hash;

        # Returning '*' on error is safe here, but would _not_ be safe
        # in a crypt(3)-like function used _both_ for generating new
        # hashes and for validating passwords against existing hashes.
        return '*';
    }

    function CheckPassword($password, $stored_hash)
    {
        $hash = $this->crypt_private($password, $stored_hash);
        if ($hash[0] == '*')
            $hash = crypt($password, $stored_hash);

        return $hash == $stored_hash;
    }
}
share|improve this question
    
Why not? Not the most secure hashing method, but extremely fast. (just joking...) – soulmerge Apr 7 '10 at 22:49
up vote 7 down vote accepted

I'm not sure exactly what you're asking. The comment directly says that it returns * on an error, so it's not "a safe hashed password", it indicates that an error occurred while trying to generate the hash. Strange choice for a return value, but it is what it is.

share|improve this answer
10  
It's presumably inspired by /etc/passwd, where * in the password field represents an account that can't be logged into (due to * not being a hash for any password). – bobince Apr 7 '10 at 22:51
    
It is because of the error code that I started to wonder whether I misunderstood something. An innocent api user now needs to read the code in advance in order to understand he needs to test against *. Thanks for confirming. – Exception e Apr 7 '10 at 22:51
    
@bobince +1 That sounds like a good reason for this odd code. – Exception e Apr 7 '10 at 22:59

The reason that * can be returned on error is that * is not a possible hash value of any password. Therefore, returning that value will make a value that is obviously not a real hash value, and can't possibly match against another hash.

share|improve this answer
    
Unless you don't treat it as an error. If the user typed a password which leads to '' and you save it as the hash inside the database. Then you do the same for the verification '' == '' so the test pass. If an error can occur, it's good to know '' should be treated as an error. If it can't, why plan this on the code? It should at least be documented. Or maybe I'm thinking wrong? (it wouldn't be the first time today...) – Savageman Apr 7 '10 at 22:50
    
Agreed. But for that case I would expect false, null, or ''. – Exception e Apr 7 '10 at 22:53
    
@Savageman, note the comment regarding crypt(3) in the code sample. The reason why this is safe is because that function doesn't make hashes for comparing, only hashes for storing. – JSBձոգչ Apr 7 '10 at 23:35

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