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I'm trying to split a string on newline characters (catering for Windows, OS X, and Unix text file newline characters). If there are any succession of these, I want to split on that too and not include any in the result.

So, for when splitting the following:

"Foo\r\n\r\nDouble Windows\r\rDouble OS X\n\nDouble Unix\r\nWindows\rOS X\nUnix"

The result would be:

['Foo', 'Double Windows', 'Double OS X', 'Double Unix', 'Windows', 'OS X', 'Unix']

What regex should I use?

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Are you concerned about other vertical whitespace? \r\n is DOS, but there are still other possible vertical whitespace such as vertical tab and Unicode NBSP, PS, LS, NNBSP. You might want to check if Python supports the concept of generic newline. Perl has \v and \R which match any generic vertical whitespace or linefeed respectively. If not, if you want the Unicode characters, add in those to your character classes [\r\n]+ and the Python equivalent of looking for those Unicode characters. –  dawg Apr 8 '10 at 2:44
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4 Answers 4

If there are no spaces at the starts or ends of the lines, you can use line.split() with no arguments. It will remove doubles. . If not, you can use [a for a a.split("\r\n") if a].

EDIT: the str type also has a method called "splitlines".

"Foo\r\n\r\nDouble Windows\r\rDouble OS X\n\nDouble Unix\r\nWindows\rOS X\nUnix".splitlines()

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+1 for splitlines –  Tyler Long Dec 4 '11 at 13:50
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The simplest pattern for this purpose is r'[\r\n]+' which you can pronounce as "one or more carriage-return or newline characters".

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Yup. That works. –  dawg Apr 8 '10 at 1:05
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re.split(r'[\n\r]+', line)
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>>> s="Foo\r\n\r\nDouble Windows\r\rDouble OS X\n\nDouble Unix\r\nWindows\rOS X\nUnix"
>>> import re
>>> re.split("[\r\n]+",s)
['Foo', 'Double Windows', 'Double OS X', 'Double Unix', 'Windows', 'OS X', 'Unix']
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