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I am trying to insert into a table using the input from another table. Although this is entirely feasible for many database engines, I always seem to struggle to remember the correct syntax for the SQL engine of the day (MySQL, Oracle, SQL Server, Informix, and DB2).

Is there a silver-bullet syntax coming from an SQL standard (for example, SQL-92) that would allow me to insert the values without worrying about the underlying database?

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this example works: insert into tag_zone select @tag,zoneid,GETDATE(),@positiong.STIntersects(polygon) from zone –  Uğur Gümüşhan Jan 3 '13 at 7:33
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14 Answers

up vote 640 down vote accepted

Try:

INSERT INTO table1 ( column1 )
SELECT  col1
FROM    table2  

That statement is representative of what should work on any RDBMS to insert data from one table into another, based on a given query result. However, due to my incapacity to install all RDBMS software and test this query, I cannot be certain. If this is incorrect for any RDBMS, please comment.

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34  
This is how to do it on Oracle –  WW. Sep 28 '08 at 5:55
85  
And MS SQL server –  littlegreen May 28 '10 at 8:48
62  
And MySQL, and afair PgSQL –  cichy Aug 24 '10 at 20:06
40  
And SQLite version 3 of the database. –  Gad D Lord Aug 27 '10 at 13:17
22  
And Teradata =D –  oscilatingcretin Dec 6 '11 at 20:28
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@Shadow_x99: That should work fine, and you can also have multiple columns and other data as well:

INSERT INTO table1 ( column1, column2, someInt, someVarChar )
SELECT  table2.column1, table2.column2, 8, 'some string etc.'
FROM    table2
WHERE   table2.ID = 7;

Edit: I should mention that I've only used this syntax with Access, SQL 2000/2005/Express, MySql, and PostGres, so those should be covered.

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4  
Yeah, then every row that was inserted would have the value 8 and 'some string etc.' for those columns. You could also use something like GETDATE() on SQL server. –  travis Jan 16 '09 at 20:40
7  
Just to be clear, the query in your answer will not work (I tested on Sql Server), as you've put the constants in the field list of the INSERT and not into the SELECT. –  Simon D Mar 30 '10 at 15:55
2  
nice catch, I've updated the sql to actually work :-) –  travis Mar 30 '10 at 17:08
2  
Thanks, it works in SQLITE3 also :) –  Mahmud Ahsan Jun 1 '11 at 6:01
72  
+1 For giving an example mixing select results and constants –  C2H5OH May 17 '12 at 20:35
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Both the answers I see work fine in Informix specifically, and are basically standard SQL. That is, the notation:

INSERT INTO target_table[(<column-list>)] SELECT ... FROM ...;

works fine with Informix and, I would expect, all the DBMS. (Once upon 5 or more years ago, this is the sort of thing that MySQL did not always support; it now has decent support for this sort of standard SQL syntax and, AFAIK, it would work OK on this notation.) The column list is optional but indicates the target columns in sequence, so the first column of the result of the SELECT will go into the first listed column, etc. In the absence of the column list, the first column of the result of the SELECT goes into the first column of the target table.

What can be different between systems is the notation used to identify tables in different databases - the standard has nothing to say about inter-database (let alone inter-DBMS) operations. With Informix, you can use the following notation to identify a table:

[dbase[@server]:][owner.]table

That is, you may specify a database, optionally identifying the server that hosts that database if it is not in the current server, followed by an optional owner, dot, and finally the actual table name. The SQL standard uses the term schema for what Informix calls the owner. Thus, in Informix, any of the following notations could identify a table:

table
"owner".table
dbase:table
dbase:owner.table
dbase@server:table
dbase@server:owner.table

The owner in general does not need to be quoted; however, if you do use quotes, you need to get the owner name spelled correctly - it becomes case-sensitive. That is:

someone.table
"someone".table
SOMEONE.table

all identify the same table. With Informix, there's a mild complication with MODE ANSI databases, where owner names are generally converted to upper-case (informix is the exception). That is, in a MODE ANSI database (not commonly used), you could write:

CREATE TABLE someone.table ( ... )

and the owner name in the system catalog would be "SOMEONE", rather than 'someone'. If you enclose the owner name in double quotes, it acts like a delimited identifier. With standard SQL, delimited identifiers can be used many places. With Informix, you can use them only around owner names -- in other contexts, Informix treats both single-quoted and double-quoted strings as strings, rather than separating single-quoted strings as strings and double-quoted strings as delimited identifiers. (Of course, just for completeness, there is an environment variable, DELIMIDENT, that can be set - to any value, but Y is safest - to indicate that double quotes always surround delimited identifiers and single quotes always surround strings.)

Note that MS SQL Server manages to use [delimited identifiers] enclosed in square brackets. It looks weird to me, and is certainly not part of the SQL standard.

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Most of the databases follow the basic syntax,

INSERT INTO TABLE_NAME
SELECT COL1, COL2 ...
FROM TABLE_YOU_NEED_TO_TAKE_FROM
;

Every database I have used follow this syntax namely, DB2, SQL Server, MY SQL, PostgresQL

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To get only one value in a multi value INSERT from another table I did the following in SQLite3:

INSERT INTO column_1 ( val_1, val_from_other_table ) 
VALUES('val_1', (SELECT  val_2 FROM table_2 WHERE val_2 = something))
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This can be done without specifying the columns in the INSERT INTO part if you are supplying values for all columns in the SELECT part.

Let's say table1 has two columns. This query should work:

INSERT INTO table1
SELECT  col1, col2
FROM    table2

This WOULD NOT work (value for col2 is not specified):

INSERT INTO table1
SELECT  col1
FROM    table2

I'm using MS SQL Server. I don't know how other RDMS work.

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This is another example using values with select:

INSERT INTO table1(desc, id, email) 
SELECT "Hello World", 3, email FROM table2 WHERE ...
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I will recommend learning to interpret the SYNTAX provided on MSDN. With Google it's easier than ever, to look for syntax.

For this particular case, try

Google: insert site:microsoft.com

The first result will be http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/ms174335.aspx

scroll down to the example ("Using the SELECT and EXECUTE options to insert data from other tables") if you find it difficult to interpret the syntax given at the top of the page.

[ WITH <common_table_expression> [ ,...n ] ]
INSERT 
{
        [ TOP ( expression ) [ PERCENT ] ] 
        [ INTO ] 
        { <object> | rowset_function_limited 
          [ WITH ( <Table_Hint_Limited> [ ...n ] ) ]
        }
    {
        [ ( column_list ) ] 
        [ <OUTPUT Clause> ]
        { VALUES ( { DEFAULT | NULL | expression } [ ,...n ] ) [ ,...n     ] 
        | derived_table       <<<<------- Look here ------------------------
        | execute_statement   <<<<------- Look here ------------------------
        | <dml_table_source>  <<<<------- Look here ------------------------
        | DEFAULT VALUES 
        }
    }
}
[;]
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1--> {Simple Insertion when table column sequence is known}
    Insert into Table1
    values(1,2,...)

2--> {Simple insertion mention column}  
    Insert into Table1(col2,col4)
    values(1,2)

3--> {bulk insertion when num of selected collumns of a table(#table2) are equal to Insertion table(Table1) }   
    Insert into Table1 {Column sequence}
    Select * -- column sequence should be same.
       from #table2

4--> {bulk insertion when you want to insert only into desired column of a table(table1)}
    Insert into Table1 (Column1,Column2 ....Desired Column from Table1)  
    Select Column1,Column2..desired column from #table2
       from #table2
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Here is another example where source is taken using more than one table:

INSERT INTO cesc_pf_stmt_ext_wrk( 
  PF_EMP_CODE    ,
  PF_DEPT_CODE   ,
  PF_SEC_CODE    ,
  PF_PROL_NO     ,
  PF_FM_SEQ      ,
  PF_SEQ_NO      ,
  PF_SEP_TAG     ,
  PF_SOURCE) 
SELECT
  PFl_EMP_CODE    ,
  PFl_DEPT_CODE   ,
  PFl_SEC         ,
  PFl_PROL_NO     ,
  PF_FM_SEQ       ,
  PF_SEQ_NO       ,
  PFl_SEP_TAG     ,
  PF_SOURCE
 FROM cesc_pf_stmt_ext,
      cesc_pfl_emp_master
 WHERE pfl_sep_tag LIKE '0'
   AND pfl_emp_code=pf_emp_code(+);

COMMIT;
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6  
Welcome to Stack Overflow! But just as an FYI. Your answer basically fits in the structure @travis supplied in his answer –  Rohan Büchner Jun 6 '12 at 13:15
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I actually prefer the following in SQL Server 2008:

SELECT Table1.Column1, Table1.Column2, Table2.Column1, Table2.Column2, 'Some String' AS SomeString, 8 AS SomeInt
INTO Table3
FROM Table1 INNER JOIN Table2 ON Table1.Column1 = Table2.Column3

It eliminates the step of adding the Insert () set, and you just select which values go in the table.

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5  
That only works if Table3 does not exist. –  Code Chops Aug 20 '13 at 13:24
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On a side note - in the context of a data migration where a large amount of rows is selected from a source table and inserted in a destination table - to improve performance you might want to drop any existing indexes from the destination table and rebuild them after the data migration.

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This worked for me:

insert into table1 select * from table2

The sentence is a bit different from Oracle's.

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select *
into tmp
from orders

Looks nice, but works only if tmp doesn't exists (creates it and fills). (SQL sever)

To insert into existing tmp table:

set identity_insert tmp on

insert tmp 
([OrderID]
      ,[CustomerID]
      ,[EmployeeID]
      ,[OrderDate]
      ,[RequiredDate]
      ,[ShippedDate]
      ,[ShipVia]
      ,[Freight]
      ,[ShipName]
      ,[ShipAddress]
      ,[ShipCity]
      ,[ShipRegion]
      ,[ShipPostalCode]
      ,[ShipCountry] )
      select * from orders

set identity_insert tmp off
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