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Is it possible to multiply a char by an int?

For example, I am trying to make a graph, with *'s for each time a number occurs.

So something like, but this doesn't work

char star = "*";
int num = 7;

cout << star * num //to output 7 stars
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1  
@dubya, the c++ tag is a lot more useful here than 'help'. For a start, we can assume you need help because, well, you're asking a question here :-) –  paxdiablo Apr 8 '10 at 1:37
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5 Answers 5

up vote 16 down vote accepted

I wouldn't call that operation "multiplication", that's just confusing. Concatenation is a better word.

In any case, the C++ standard string class, named std::string, has a constructor that's perfect for you.

string ( size_t n, char c );

Content is initialized as a string formed by a repetition of character c, n times.

So you can go like this:

char star = '*';  
int num = 7;
std::cout << std::string(num, star) << std::endl;  

Make sure to include the relevant header, <string>.

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+1 for referencing the std library. Too few folks do that these days. –  Randolpho Apr 8 '10 at 1:23
2  
"Concatenation" is also a bad word. There isn't really a word for this, but 'iteration' I think comes closer, since that's really what you have to do to achieve the desired result. –  SoapBox Apr 8 '10 at 1:59
1  
It was 'catenation' when I wrote it. –  janks Apr 8 '10 at 2:14
2  
My dictionary says that one of the definitions of 'concatenation' is 'add by linking or joining so as to form a chain or series'. That strikes me as being an accurate description of this operation. –  janks Apr 8 '10 at 2:33
    
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the way you're doing it will do a numeric multiplication of the binary representation of the '*' character against the number 7 and output the resulting number.

What you want to do (based on your c++ code comment) is this:

char star = '*';
int num = 7;
for(int i=0; i<num; i++)
{
    cout << star;
}// outputs 7 stars. 
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GMan's over-eningeering of this problem inspired me to do some template meta-programming to further over-engineer it.

#include <iostream>

template<int c, char ch>
class repeater {
  enum { Count = c, Char = ch };
  friend std::ostream &operator << (std::ostream &os, const repeater &r) {
    return os << (char)repeater::Char << repeater<repeater::Count-1,repeater::Char>();
  }
};

template<char ch>
class repeater<0, ch> {
  enum { Char = ch };
friend std::ostream &operator << (std::ostream &os, const repeater &r) {
    return os;
  }
};

main() {
    std::cout << "test" << std::endl;
    std::cout << "8 r = " << repeater<8,'r'>() << std::endl;
}
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Ah, a meta-programming counter-part to me answer. Most excellent. +1 (Careful, you'll get down votes for being "too clever") –  GManNickG Apr 8 '10 at 2:33
    
@GMan So using a built-in std::string constructor is less readable than a for-loop, but this deserves a +1 from you? –  joshperry Oct 30 '10 at 1:18
    
@josh: If you didn't ever see my answer, and the stupidity expressed by some users on this question (and hence my reply to that stupidity), this won't make sense. –  GManNickG Oct 30 '10 at 9:18
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You could do this:

std::cout << std::string(7, '*');
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The statement should be:

char star = "*";

(star * num) will multiply the ASCII value of '*' with the value stored in num

To output '*' n times, follow the ideas poured in by others.

Hope this helps.

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