Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

In the .NET framework there are a couple of ways to calculate an MD5 hash it seems, however there is something I don't understand;

What is the distinction between the following? What sets them apart from eachother? They seem to produce identical results:

    public static string GetMD5Hash(string str)
    {
        MD5CryptoServiceProvider md5 = new MD5CryptoServiceProvider();
        byte[] bytes = ASCIIEncoding.Default.GetBytes(str);
        byte[] encoded = md5.ComputeHash(bytes);

        StringBuilder sb = new StringBuilder();
        for (int i = 0; i < encoded.Length; i++)
            sb.Append(encoded[i].ToString("x2"));

        return sb.ToString();
    }

    public static string GetMD5Hash2(string str)
    {
        System.Security.Cryptography.MD5 md5 = System.Security.Cryptography.MD5.Create();
        byte[] bytes = Encoding.Default.GetBytes(str);
        byte[] encoded = md5.ComputeHash(bytes);

        StringBuilder sb = new StringBuilder();
        for (int i = 0; i < encoded.Length; i++)
            sb.Append(encoded[i].ToString("x2"));

        return sb.ToString();
    }
share|improve this question
add comment

2 Answers

up vote 15 down vote accepted

System.Security.Cryptography.MD5.Create() is actually creating a MD5CryptoServiceProvider. That is why you see the same results.

Looking at the definition MD5 is the base class and it's abstract. I'm guessing they added the public create function for ease of use.

public sealed class MD5CryptoServiceProvider : MD5

public abstract class MD5 : HashAlgorithm

Take a look at the definitions.

MD5 Represents the abstract class from which all implementations of the MD5 hash algorithm inherit.

MD5CryptoServiceProvider Computes the MD5 hash value for the input data using the implementation provided by the cryptographic service provider (CSP). This class cannot be inherited.

share|improve this answer
1  
Whould you consider the MD5.Create() method as a kind of factory method that may rerturn a MD5CryptoServiceProvider instance today but has the flexability to return any type of MD5 implementation in future versions? It's return type is MD5, so if you want your program to use the latest implementation, then use the MD5.Create() method. –  Ben Oct 5 '12 at 14:27
add comment

As Jason Rowe mentioned (please vote for his answer, this is just a word of warning), there is no functional difference. However, there is a difference if you are considering MD5Managed (or any cryptography class with Managed in the name). Managed-named classes cannot be used when FIPS-compliant encryption algorithms are enabled via Group Policy.

share|improve this answer
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.