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If I have two interfaces , both quite different in their purposes , but with same method signature , how do I make a class implement both without being forced to write a single method that serves for the both the interfaces and writing some convoluted logic in the method implementation that checks for which type of object the call is being made and invoke proper code ?

In C# , this is overcome by what is called as explicit interface implementation. Is there any equivalent way in Java ?

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21  
When one class has to implement two methods with the same signature that do different things, then your class is almost certainly doing too many things. –  Joachim Sauer Apr 8 '10 at 6:45
4  
The above may not true always IMO.Sometimes , in a single class , you need methods that must confirm to an external contract ( thus constraining on the signatures ) , but which have different implementations. In fact , these are common requirements when designing a non-trivial class. Overloading and overriding are necessarily mechanisms to allow for methods that do different things that may not differ in signature , or differ very slightly.What I have here is just a bit more restrictive in it that it does not allow subclassing / and does not allow even slightest variation on signatures. –  Bhaskar Apr 8 '10 at 13:07
    
I'd be intrigued to know what these classes and methods are. –  Uri Apr 8 '10 at 14:04
    
I encountered such a case where a legacy "Address" class implemented Person and Firm interfaces that had a getName() method simply returning a String from the data model. A new business requirement specified that the the Person.getName() return a String formatted as "Surname, Given names". After much discussion, the data was re-formated in the database instead. –  belwood Jan 10 '12 at 18:13
    
Just stating that the class is almost certainly doing too many things is NOT CONSTRUCTIVE. I've got this very case right now that my class has mehod name collisions from 2 different interfaces, and my class is NOT doing too many things. The purposes are quite similar, but do slightly different things. Don't try to defend a obviously severely handicapped programming language by accusing the questioner of implementing bad software design! –  j00hi Jul 22 at 10:29

6 Answers 6

up vote 39 down vote accepted

No, there is no way to implement the same method in two different ways in one class in Java.

That can lead to many confusing situations, which is why Java has disallowed it.

interface ISomething {
    void doSomething();
}

interface ISomething2 {
    void doSomething();
}

class Impl implements ISomething, ISomething2 {
   void doSomething() {} // There can only be one implementation of this method.
}

What you can do is compose a class out of two classes that each implement a different interface. Then that one class will have the behavior of both interfaces.

class CompositeClass {
    ISomething class1;
    ISomething2 class2;
    void doSomething1(){class1.doSomething();}
    void doSomething2(){class2.doSomething();}
}
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5  
But this way , I cannot pass an instance of CompositeClass somewhere a reference of the interfaces ( ISomething or ISomething2 ) are expected ? I cannot even expect client code to be able to cast my instance to the appropriate interface , so am I not loosing something by this restriction ? Also note that in this way , when writing classes that actually implement the respective interfaces , we loose the benefit of having the code into a single class , which may be a serious impediment sometimes. –  Bhaskar Apr 8 '10 at 9:18
4  
@Bhaskar, you make valid points. The best advice I have is add a ISomething1 CompositeClass.asInterface1(); and ISomething2 CompositeClass.asInterface2(); method to that class. Then you can just get one or the other out of the composite class. There is no great solution to this problem though. –  jjnguy Apr 8 '10 at 9:30
1  
Speaking of the confusing situations this can lead to , can you give an example ? Can we not think of the interface name added to the method name as an extra scope resolution which can then avoid the collision/ confusion ? –  Bhaskar Apr 8 '10 at 10:18
    
@Bhaskar Its better if our classes adhere to single responsibility principle. If there exists a class that implements two very different interfaces i think the design should be reworked to split the classes to take care of single responsibility. –  Anirudhan J Nov 8 '13 at 17:02
1  
How confusing would it be, really, to allow something like public long getCountAsLong() implements interface2.getCount {...} [in case the interface requires a long but users of the class expect int] or private void AddStub(T newObj) implements coolectionInterface.Add [assuming collectionInterface has a canAdd() method, and for all instances of this class it returns false]? –  supercat Dec 17 '13 at 22:55

If you are encountering this problem, it is most likely because you are using inheritance where you should be using delegation. If you need to provide two different, albeit similar, interfaces for the same underlying model of data, then you should use a view to cheaply provide access to the data using some other interface.

To give a concrete example for the latter case, suppose you want to implement both Collection and MyCollection (which does not inherit from Collection and has an incompatible interface). You could provide a "Collection getCollectionView()" and "MyCollection getMyCollectionView()" functions which provide a light-weight implementation of Collection and MyCollection, using the same underlying data.

For the former case... suppose you really want an array of integers and an array of strings. Instead of inheriting from both List<Integer> and List<String>, you should have one member of type List<Integer> and another member of type List<String>, and refer to those members, rather than try to inherit from both. Even if you only needed a list of integers, it is better to use composition/delegation over inheritance in this case.

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There's no real way to solve this in Java. You could use inner classes as a workaround:

interface Alfa { void m(); }
interface Beta { void m(); }
class AlfaBeta implements Alfa {
    private int value;
    public void m() { ++value; } // Alfa.m()
    public Beta asBeta() {
        return new Beta(){
            public void m() { --value; } // Beta.m()
        };
    }
}

Although it doesn't allow for casts from AlfaBeta to Beta, downcasts are generally evil, and if it can be expected that an Alfa instance often has a Beta aspect, too, and for some reason (usually optimization is the only valid reason) you want to be able to convert it to Beta, you could make a sub-interface of Alfa with Beta asBeta() in it.

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Do you mean anonymous class rather than inner class? –  Zaid Masud Sep 7 '12 at 13:39
    
@ZaidMasud I mean inner classes, since they can access the private state of the enclosing object). These inner classes can of course be anonymous, too. –  gustafc Sep 7 '12 at 14:13

The "classical" Java problem also affects my Android development...
The reason seems to be simple:
More frameworks/libraries you have to use, more easily things can be out of control...

In my case, I have a BootStrapperApp class inherited from android.app.Application,
whereas the same class should also implement a Platform interface of a MVVM framework in order to get integrated.
Method collision occurred on a getString() method, which is announced by both interfaces and should have differenet implementation in different contexts.
The workaround (ugly..IMO) is using an inner class to implement all Platform methods, just because of one minor method signature conflict...in some case, such borrowed method is even not used at all (but affected major design semantics).
I tend to agree C#-style explicit context/namespace indication is helpful.

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The only solution that came in my mind is using referece objects to the one you want to implent muliple interfaceces.

eg: supposing you have 2 interfaces to implement

public interface Framework1Interface {

    void method(Object o);
}

and

public interface Framework2Interface {
    void method(Object o);
}

you can enclose them in to two Facador objects:

public class Facador1 implements Framework1Interface {

    private final ObjectToUse reference;

    public static Framework1Interface Create(ObjectToUse ref) {
        return new Facador1(ref);
    }

    private Facador1(ObjectToUse refObject) {
        this.reference = refObject;
    }

    @Override
    public boolean equals(Object obj) {
        if (obj instanceof Framework1Interface) {
            return this == obj;
        } else if (obj instanceof ObjectToUse) {
            return reference == obj;
        }
        return super.equals(obj);
    }

    @Override
    public void method(Object o) {
        reference.methodForFrameWork1(o);
    }
}

and

public class Facador2 implements Framework2Interface {

    private final ObjectToUse reference;

    public static Framework2Interface Create(ObjectToUse ref) {
        return new Facador2(ref);
    }

    private Facador2(ObjectToUse refObject) {
        this.reference = refObject;
    }

    @Override
    public boolean equals(Object obj) {
        if (obj instanceof Framework2Interface) {
            return this == obj;
        } else if (obj instanceof ObjectToUse) {
            return reference == obj;
        }
        return super.equals(obj);
    }

    @Override
    public void method(Object o) {
        reference.methodForFrameWork2(o);
    }
}

In the end the class you wanted should something like

public class ObjectToUse {

    private Framework1Interface facFramework1Interface;
    private Framework2Interface facFramework2Interface;

    public ObjectToUse() {
    }

    public Framework1Interface getAsFramework1Interface() {
        if (facFramework1Interface == null) {
            facFramework1Interface = Facador1.Create(this);
        }
        return facFramework1Interface;
    }

    public Framework2Interface getAsFramework2Interface() {
        if (facFramework2Interface == null) {
            facFramework2Interface = Facador2.Create(this);
        }
        return facFramework2Interface;
    }

    public void methodForFrameWork1(Object o) {
    }

    public void methodForFrameWork2(Object o) {
    }
}

you can now use the getAs* methods to "expose" your class

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You can use an Adapter pattern in order to make these work. Create two adapter for each interface and use that. It should solve the problem.

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