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The following code is trying to remove any duplicate characters in a string. I'm not sure if the code is right. Can anybody help me work with the code (i.e whats actually happening when there is a match in characters)?

public static void removeDuplicates(char[] str) {
  if (str == null) return;
  int len = str.length;
  if (len < 2) return;
  int tail = 1;
  for (int i = 1; i < len; ++i) {
    int j;
    for (j = 0; j < tail; ++j) {
      if (str[i] == str[j]) break;
    }
    if (j == tail) {
      str[tail] = str[i];
      ++tail;
    }
  }
  str[tail] = 0;
}
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16  
This is one of the exercises from the book "Cracking the code interview", page 97. "Write code to remove the duplicate characters in a string without using any additional buffer". NOTE: One or two additional variables are fine. An extra copy of the array is not. –  Franklin Dattein Jun 25 '11 at 5:03
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21 Answers

up vote 22 down vote accepted

The function looks fine to me. I've written inline comments. Hope it helps:

// function takes a char array as input.
// modifies it to remove duplicates and adds a 0 to mark the end
// of the unique chars in the array.
public static void removeDuplicates(char[] str) {
  if (str == null) return; // if the array does not exist..nothing to do return.
  int len = str.length; // get the array length.
  if (len < 2) return; // if its less than 2..can't have duplicates..return.
  int tail = 1; // number of unique char in the array.
  // start at 2nd char and go till the end of the array.
  for (int i = 1; i < len; ++i) { 
    int j;
    // for every char in outer loop check if that char is already seen.
    // char in [0,tail) are all unique.
    for (j = 0; j < tail; ++j) {
      if (str[i] == str[j]) break; // break if we find duplicate.
    }
    // if j reachs tail..we did not break, which implies this char at pos i
    // is not a duplicate. So we need to add it our "unique char list"
    // we add it to the end, that is at pos tail.
    if (j == tail) {
      str[tail] = str[i]; // add
      ++tail; // increment tail...[0,tail) is still "unique char list"
    }
  }
  str[tail] = 0; // add a 0 at the end to mark the end of the unique char.
}
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thanks cool its now simple –  Jonathan Apr 8 '10 at 7:30
9  
The code is not fine; the last line causes ArrayIndexOutOfBoundsException if there aren't any dupes. –  polygenelubricants Apr 8 '10 at 8:10
    
@polygenelubricants: Good catch. –  codaddict Apr 8 '10 at 8:12
1  
Too late, but the very last line before the last bracket: [if(tail<len) str[tail] = 0;] –  rgamber Sep 29 '12 at 5:35
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Your code is, I'm sorry to say, very C-like.

A Java String is not a char[]. You say you want to remove duplicates from a String, but you take a char[] instead.

Is this char[] \0-terminated? Doesn't look like it because you take the whole .length of the array. But then your algorithm tries to \0-terminate a portion of the array. What happens if the arrays contains no duplicates?

Well, as it is written, your code actually throws an ArrayIndexOutOfBoundsException on the last line! There is no room for the \0 because all slots are used up!

You can add a check not to add \0 in this exceptional case, but then how are you planning to use this code anyway? Are you planning to have a strlen-like function to find the first \0 in the array? And what happens if there isn't any? (due to all-unique exceptional case above?).

What happens if the original String/char[] contains a \0? (which is perfectly legal in Java, by the way, see JLS 10.9 An Array of Characters is Not a String)

The result will be a mess, and all because you want to do everything C-like, and in place without any additional buffer. Are you sure you really need to do this? Why not work with String, indexOf, lastIndexOf, replace, and all the higher-level API of String? Is it provably too slow, or do you only suspect that it is?

"Premature optimization is the root of all evils". I'm sorry but if you can't even understand what the original code does, then figuring out how it will fit in the bigger (and messier) system will be a nightmare.


My minimal suggestion is to do the following:

  • Make the function takes and returns a String, i.e. public static String removeDuplicates(String in)
  • Internally, works with char[] str = in.toCharArray();
  • Replace the last line by return new String(str, 0, tail);

This does use additional buffers, but at least the interface to the rest of the system is much cleaner.


Alternatively, you can use StringBuilder as such:

static String removeDuplicates(String s) {
    StringBuilder noDupes = new StringBuilder();
    for (int i = 0; i < s.length(); i++) {
        String si = s.substring(i, i + 1);
        if (noDupes.indexOf(si) == -1) {
            noDupes.append(si);
        }
    }
    return noDupes.toString();
}

Note that this is essentially the same algorithm as what you had, but much cleaner and without as many little corner cases, etc.

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6  
The solution using StringBuilder is certainly better but not within the boundaries of the problem. Design an algorithm and write code to remove the duplicate characters in a string without using any additional buffer. NOTE: One or two additional variables are fine. An extra copy of the array is not. –  eLobato Feb 4 '12 at 7:26
1  
@polygene why use substring() when you can use charAt() instead? –  Dhruv Gairola May 6 '12 at 19:09
    
@DhruvGairola, I'm in agreement with you. This is a sound algorithm, but from a stylistic point of view, this method would become much more readable if charAt(i) was used. I like to look at code as if I'm giving it to someone who has never seen the it before, and I want them to ask minimal questions. –  Franklin Aug 11 '13 at 4:42
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Given the following question :

Write code to remove the duplicate characters in a string without using any additional buffer. NOTE: One or two additional variables are fine. An extra copy of the array is not.

Since one or two additional variables are fine but no buffer is allowed, you can simulate the behaviour of a hashmap by using an integer to store bits instead. This simple solution runs at O(n), which is faster than yours. Also, it isn't conceptually complicated and in-place :

    public static void removeDuplicates(char[] str) {
        int map = 0;
        for (int i = 0; i < str.length; i++) {
            if ((map & (1 << (str[i] - 'a'))) > 0) // duplicate detected
                str[i] = 0;
            else // add unique char as a bit '1' to the map
                map |= 1 << (str[i] - 'a');
        }
    }

The drawback is that the duplicates (which are replaced with 0's) will not be placed at the end of the str[] array. However, this can easily be fixed by looping through the array one last time. Also, an integer has the capacity for only regular letters.

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I really like this solution, very C like. Conceptually a great solution, however, it does not work for normal cases. It will only work from a..z case sensitive. No spaces supported. This would work miracles in a 256bit system to process the entire ASCII range. But it does run in O(N). I still +1 this one. –  ruralcoder Apr 10 '13 at 7:20
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private static String removeDuplicateCharactersFromWord(String word) {

    String result = new String("");

    for (int i = 0; i < word.length(); i++) {
        if (!result.contains("" + word.charAt(i))) {
            result += "" + word.charAt(i);
        }
    }

    return result;
}
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char[] chars = s.toCharArray();
    HashSet<Character> charz = new HashSet<Character>();

    for(Character c : s.toCharArray() )
    {
        if(!charz.contains(c))
        {
            charz.add(c);
            //System.out.print(c);
        }
    }

    for(Character c : charz)
    {
        System.out.print(c);
    }
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very perl-ish. +1 –  knb May 6 '12 at 21:03
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public static void main (String [] args)
    {
        String s = "aabbbeeddsfre";//sample string
        String temp2="";//string with no duplicates
        HashMap<Integer,Character> tc = new HashMap<Integer,Character>();//create a hashmap to store the char's
        char [] charArray = s.toCharArray();
        for (Character c : charArray)//for each char
        {
            if (!tc.containsValue(c))//if the char is not already in the hashmap
                {
                    temp2=temp2+c.toString();//add the char to the output string
                    tc.put(c.hashCode(),c);//and add the char to the hashmap
                }
        }

        System.out.println(temp2);//final string
    }

instead of HashMap I think we can use Set too.

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Substringing method. Concatenation is done with .concat() to avoid allocation additional memory for left hand and right hand of +. Note: This removes even duplicate spaces.

private static String withoutDuplicatesSubstringing(String s){

        for(int i = 0; i < s.length(); i++){
          String sub = s.substring(i+1);
          int index = -1;
          while((index = sub.toLowerCase().indexOf(Character.toLowerCase(s.charAt(i)))) > -1 && !sub.isEmpty()){
              sub = sub.substring(0, index).concat(sub.substring(index+1, sub.length()));
          }
          s = s.substring(0, i+1).concat(sub);
        }
        return s;
    }

Test case:

String testCase1 = "nanananaa! baaaaatmaan! batman!";

Output: na! btm

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This would be much easier if you just looped through the array and added all new characters to a list, then retruned that list.

With this approach, you need to reshuffle the array as you step through it and eventually redimension it to the appropriate size in the end.

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Thanks ck but iam trying do the code inplace without using any additional buffer. –  Jonathan Apr 8 '10 at 7:15
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    String s = "Javajk";
    List<Character> charz = new ArrayList<Character>();
    for (Character c : s.toCharArray()) {
        if (!(charz.contains(Character.toUpperCase(c)) || charz
                .contains(Character.toLowerCase(c)))) {
            charz.add(c);
        }
    }
     ListIterator litr = charz.listIterator();
   while (litr.hasNext()) {

       Object element = litr.next();
       System.err.println(":" + element);

   }    }

this will remove the duplicate if the character present in both the case.

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public class StringRedundantChars {
/**
 * @param args
 */
public static void main(String[] args) {

    //initializing the string to be sorted
    String sent = "I love painting and badminton";

    //Translating the sentence into an array of characters
    char[] chars = sent.toCharArray();

    System.out.println("Before Sorting");
    showLetters(chars);

    //Sorting the characters based on the ASCI character code. 
    java.util.Arrays.sort(chars);

    System.out.println("Post Sorting");
    showLetters(chars);

    System.out.println("Removing Duplicates");
    stripDuplicateLetters(chars);

    System.out.println("Post Removing Duplicates");
    //Sorting to collect all unique characters 
    java.util.Arrays.sort(chars);
    showLetters(chars);

}

/**
 * This function prints all valid characters in a given array, except empty values
 * 
 * @param chars Input set of characters to be displayed
 */
private static void showLetters(char[] chars) {

    int i = 0;
    //The following loop is to ignore all white spaces
    while ('\0' == chars[i]) {
        i++;
    }
    for (; i < chars.length; i++) {
        System.out.print(" " + chars[i]);
    }
    System.out.println();
}

private static char[] stripDuplicateLetters(char[] chars) {

    // Basic cursor that is used to traverse through the unique-characters
    int cursor = 0;
    // Probe which is used to traverse the string for redundant characters
    int probe = 1;

    for (; cursor < chars.length - 1;) {

        // Checking if the cursor and probe indices contain the same
        // characters
        if (chars[cursor] == chars[probe]) {
            System.out.println("Removing char : " + chars[probe]);
            // Please feel free to replace the redundant character with
            // character. I have used '\0'
            chars[probe] = '\0';
            // Pushing the probe to the next character
            probe++;
        } else {
            // Since the probe has traversed the chars from cursor it means
            // that there were no unique characters till probe.
            // Hence set cursor to the probe value
            cursor = probe;
            // Push the probe to refer to the next character
            probe++;
        }
    }
    System.out.println();

    return chars;
}

}

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1  
@ Shrivatsan : welcome to stackover flow. You picked up a very old question. It had a good answer too. You can add new answers, but include more specific details how your answer compared to others.. like memory/time complexity etc. –  Jayan Apr 16 '12 at 1:36
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public class RemoveDuplicateInString {
    public static void main(String[] args) {
        String s = "ABCDDCA";
        RemoveDuplicateInString rs = new RemoveDuplicateInString();
        System.out.println(rs.removeDuplicate(s));

    }

    public String removeDuplicate(String s) {
        String retn = null;
        boolean[] b = new boolean[256];

        char[] ch = s.toCharArray();
        for (int i = 0; i < ch.length; i++) {

            if (b[ch[i]]) {
                ch[i]=' ';

            }

            else {
                b[ch[i]] = true;

            }
        }

        retn = new String(ch);
        return retn;

    }

}
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/* program to remove the duplicate character in string */
/* Author senthilkumar M*/

char *dup_remove(char *str) 
{
    int i = 0, j = 0, l = strlen(str);
    int flag = 0, result = 0;

    for(i = 0; i < l; i++) {
         result = str[i] - 'a';
         if(flag & (1 << result)) {
            */* if duplicate found remove & shift the array*/*
            for(j = i; j < l; j++) {
                  str[j] = str[j+1];
             }
             i--; 
             l--; /* duplicates removed so string length reduced by 1 character*/
             continue;
         }
         flag |= (1 << result);
     }
     return str;
}
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I understand that this is a Java question, but since I have a nice solution which could inspire someone to convert this into Java, by all means. Also I like answers where multiple language submissions are available to common problems.

So here is a Python solution which is O(n) and also supports the whole ASCII range. Of course it does not treat 'a' and 'A' as the same:

I am using 8 x 32 bits as the hashmap:

Also input is a string array using dedup(list('some string'))

def dedup(str):
    map = [0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0]
    for i in range(len(str)):
        ascii = ord(str[i])
        slot = ascii / 32
        bit = ascii % 32
        bitOn = map[slot] & (1 << bit)
        if bitOn:
            str[i] = ''
        else:
            map[slot] |= 1 << bit

    return ''.join(str)

also a more pythonian way to do this is by using a set:

def dedup(s):
    return ''.join(list(set(s)))
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public class RemoveCharsFromString {

static String testcase1 = "No, I am going to Noida";
static String testcase2 = "goings";

public static void main(String args[])throws StringIndexOutOfBoundsException{
    RemoveCharsFromString testInstance= new RemoveCharsFromString();
    String result = testInstance.remove(testcase1,testcase2);
    System.out.println(result);
}

//write your code here
public String remove(String str, String str1)throws StringIndexOutOfBoundsException
    {   String result=null;


       if (str == null)
        return "";


    try
    {
     for (int i = 0; i < str1.length (); i++) 
    {


        char ch1=str1.charAt(i);
        for(int j=0;j<str.length();j++)
        {
            char ch = str.charAt (j);

        if (ch == ch1)
        {
        String s4=String.valueOf(ch);
        String s5= str.replaceAll(s4, "");
        str=s5;


        }
        }

    }
    }
    catch(Exception e)
    {

    }
    result=str;
    return result;
    }
 }
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public static void main(String[] args) {

    char[] str = { 'a', 'b', 'a','b','c','e','c' };

    for (int i = 1; i < str.length; i++) {
        for (int j = 0; j < i; j++) {
            if (str[i] == str[j]) {
                str[i] = ' ';
            }
        }

    }
    System.out.println(str);
}
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Using guava you can just do smth like Sets.newHashSet(charArray).toArray(); If you are not using any libraries - you can still use new HashSet<Char>() and add your char array there

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An improved version for using bitmask to handle 256 chars:

public static void removeDuplicates3(char[] str) 
{
  long map[] = new long[] {0, 0, 0 ,0};
  long one = 1;

  for (int i = 0; i < str.length; i++) 
  {
    long chBit = (one << (str[i]%64));
    int n = (int) str[i]/64;

    if ((map[n] & chBit ) > 0) // duplicate detected
        str[i] = 0;
    else // add unique char as a bit '1' to the map
        map[n] |= chBit ;
  }

  // get rid of those '\0's
  int wi = 1;
  for (int i=1; i<str.length; i++)
  {
    if (str[i]!=0) str[wi++] = str[i];
  }

  // setting the rest as '\0'
  for (;wi<str.length; wi++) str[wi] = 0;
}

Result: "##1!!ASDJasanwAaw.,;..][,[]==--0" ==> "#1!ASDJasnw.,;][=-0" (double quotes not included)

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This function removes duplicate from string inline. I have used C# as a coding language and the duplicates are removed inline

 public static void removeDuplicate(char[] inpStr)
        {
            if (inpStr == null) return;
            if (inpStr.Length < 2) return;

        for (int i = 0; i < inpStr.Length; ++i)
        {

            int j, k;
            for (j = 1; j < inpStr.Length; j++)
            {

                if (inpStr[i] == inpStr[j] && i != j)
                {
                    for (k = j; k < inpStr.Length - 1; k++)
                    {
                        inpStr[k] = inpStr[k + 1];
                    }
                    inpStr[k] = ' ';
                }
            }

        }


        Console.WriteLine(inpStr);

    }
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~ O(n^3) .. not good :/ –  vbp Mar 27 at 0:31
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(Java) Avoiding usage of Map, List data structures:

private String getUniqueStr(String someStr) {
    StringBuilder uniqueStr = new StringBuilder();
            if(someStr != null) {
       for(int i=0; i <someStr.length(); i++)   {
        if(uniqueStr.indexOf(String.valueOf(someStr.charAt(i))) == -1)  {
            uniqueStr.append(someStr.charAt(i));
        }
       }
            }
    return uniqueStr.toString();
}
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This will solve purpose in fast and simple code. It gives result in O(n).

void removeduplicate(char *str)
{
    int checker = 0;
    int cnt = 0;
    for(int i = 0; i < strlen(str); i++)
    {
        int val = *(str + i) - (int)'a';
        if ((checker & (1 << val)) > 0) continue;
        else {
            *(str + cnt) = *(str + i);
            cnt++;
        }
        checker |= (1 << val);
    }
    *(str+cnt) = '\0';
}
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The question is about Java, not C. And even in C your code has issues (e.g. will only work for strings consisting only of lowercase letters). –  interjay Nov 22 '12 at 18:49
    
This only works if the string has a very limited range of code points. In Java, characters are 16-bit Unicode UTF-16 values. –  Ted Hopp Nov 22 '12 at 18:51
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public static void main(String[] args) {
    String palabra = "hello";

    for (int x = 1; x <= palabra.length(); x++){
            palabra = palabra + palabra.substring(palabra.length()-x,palabra.length()-x+1);
            palabra = palabra.substring(0,palabra.length()-x-1) + palabra.substring(palabra.length()-x);
    }
    System.out.println(palabra);
}

Sorry that one was to reverse the word lol

this one is the one is the one to erase the duplicates without using any additional buffer, just with 2 variables.

public static void main(String[] args) {
    String string = new String();
    string = "asdfasdf";
    for (int x = 0; x < string.length(); x++)
        for (int y = x+1; y <= string.length()-1; y++){
            if (string.charAt(x) == string.charAt(y)){
                string = string.substring(0,y)+ string.substring(y+1,string.length());
                y--;
            }
        }
    System.out.println(string);
}
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