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The following function is trying to find the nth to last element of a singly linked list.

For example:

If the elements are 8->10->5->7->2->1->5->4->10->10 then the result is 7th to last node is 7.

Can anybody help me on how this code is working or is there a better and simpler approach?

LinkedListNode nthToLast(LinkedListNode head, int n) {
  if (head == null || n < 1) {
  return null;
}
  LinkedListNode p1 = head;
  LinkedListNode p2 = head;
  for (int j = 0; j < n - 1; ++j) { // skip n-1 steps ahead
  if (p2 == null) {
       return null; // not found since list size < n
   }
  p2 = p2.next;
  }
  while (p2.next != null) {
  p1 = p1.next;
  p2 = p2.next;
 }
   return p1;
 }
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3  
Another solution may be to use recursion but it would be less effective than your algorithm. I think that your algorithm is simple and effective. –  MartyIX Apr 8 '10 at 8:20
44  
This code was taken from Gayle Laakmann's book and you should have said so. –  Jim Balter May 10 '11 at 18:03

22 Answers 22

up vote 24 down vote accepted

This sounds like a homework problem.

In any case, your algorithm works by first creating references to two nodes in your linked list that are N nodes apart. Thus, in your example, if N is 7, then it will set p1 to 8 and p2 to 4.

It will then advance each node reference to the next node in the list until p2 reaches the last element in the list. Again, in your example, this will be when p1 is 5 and p2 is 10. At this point, p1 is referring to the Nth to the last element in the list (by the property that they are N nodes apart).

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1  
Even if you do it in this lockstepped-fashion, isn't it analogous to iterating the list twice? We can think of each reference as an iterator, so one goes to n, and the other to n - separation. Thus, we have the same number of steps as if we used one iterator to count (n steps) and another one to reach the node in position n - separation. –  tinchou Jun 5 '14 at 3:10
1  
@tinchou: Your suggestion is a correct alternate implementation and perhaps a bit clearer to understand. Both implementations are O(n) so they are analagous. I would expect the implementation in Jonathan's question to be negligibly more efficient. –  Eric Aug 20 '14 at 22:22
    
Is what @tinchou is suggesting recursively going to the end of the list to retrieve the size, n, then looping through again to find the k th from last element?? –  franklin Jan 19 at 16:22
    
@franklin Yes, but I would describe it as iterating to the end of the list rather than recursing to it. –  Eric Jan 19 at 19:10
1  
@tinchou, this lockstep approach will generally give better cache utilization, because a node hit by the front pointer may still be in cache when the rear pointer reaches it. In a language implementation using tracing garbage collection, this approach also avoids unnecessarily keeping the beginning (thus entire) list live for the duration of the operation. –  dfeuer Apr 16 at 16:43

The key to this algorithm is to set two pointers p1 and p2 apart by n-1 nodes initially so we want p2 to point to the (n-1)th node from the start of the list then we move p2 till it reaches the last node of the list. Once p2 reaches end of the list p1 will be pointing to the nth node from the end of the list.

I've put the explanation inline as comments. Hope it helps:

// Function to return the nth node from the end of a linked list.
// Takes the head pointer to the list and n as input
// Returns the nth node from the end if one exists else returns NULL.
LinkedListNode nthToLast(LinkedListNode head, int n) {
  // If list does not exist or if there are no elements in the list,return NULL
  if (head == null || n < 1) {
    return null;
  }

  // make pointers p1 and p2 point to the start of the list.
  LinkedListNode p1 = head;
  LinkedListNode p2 = head;

  // The key to this algorithm is to set p1 and p2 apart by n-1 nodes initially
  // so we want p2 to point to the (n-1)th node from the start of the list
  // then we move p2 till it reaches the last node of the list. 
  // Once p2 reaches end of the list p1 will be pointing to the nth node 
  // from the end of the list.

  // loop to move p2.
  for (int j = 0; j < n - 1; ++j) { 
   // while moving p2 check if it becomes NULL, that is if it reaches the end
   // of the list. That would mean the list has less than n nodes, so its not 
   // possible to find nth from last, so return NULL.
   if (p2 == null) {
       return null; 
   }
   // move p2 forward.
   p2 = p2.next;
  }

  // at this point p2 is (n-1) nodes ahead of p1. Now keep moving both forward
  // till p2 reaches the last node in the list.
  while (p2.next != null) {
    p1 = p1.next;
    p2 = p2.next;
  }

   // at this point p2 has reached the last node in the list and p1 will be
   // pointing to the nth node from the last..so return it.
   return p1;
 }

Alternatively we can set p1 and p2 apart by n nodes instead of (n-1) and then move p2 till the end of the list instead of moving till the last node:

LinkedListNode p1 = head;
LinkedListNode p2 = head;
for (int j = 0; j < n ; ++j) { // make then n nodes apart.
    if (p2 == null) {
        return null;
    }
    p2 = p2.next;
}
while (p2 != null) { // move till p2 goes past the end of the list.
    p1 = p1.next;
    p2 = p2.next;
}
return p1;
share|improve this answer
1  
Thanks for neat explanation –  Barry Nov 20 '11 at 15:18
    
nice explanation... thanks –  Pratik Jul 25 '13 at 4:31
    
This should be the accepted answer. –  Michael Jun 10 at 23:16
    
Perfect! best explanation I've seen. Thanks a lot. –  asgs Jul 3 at 10:38
//this  is the recursive solution


//initial call
find(HEAD,k);

// main function
void find(struct link *temp,int k)
{  
 if( temp->next != NULL)
   find( temp->next, k);
 if((c++) == k)       // c is initially declared as 1 and k is the node to find from last.
  cout<<temp->num<<' ';
}
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What do you think regarding this approach.

  1. Count length of the linkedlist.
  2. Actual Node index from head = linkedlist length - given index;
  3. Write a function to travesre from head and get the node at the above index.
share|improve this answer
    
I suggest same solution by maintaining size of list should make life simple to get it work. –  Jayasagar Jan 27 '14 at 15:49
    
This is good except that you traverse twice. Once to get the length of the list (because you have no other way to know the size without traversing till end) and another to actually find the element you're interested in. –  asgs Jul 3 at 10:39

Since this sounds like homework, I prefer to help you help yourself instead of giving an actual solution.

I suggest you run this code on some small sample dataset. Use your debugger to run lines step-by-step (you can set a breakpoint at the start of the function). This should give you an idea of how the code works.

You can also Console.WriteLine() to output variables of interest.

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Just another solution to this problem. Though the time complexity remains the same, this code achieves the solution in a single loop.

public Link findKthElementFromEnd(MyLinkedList linkedList, int k)
    {
        Link current = linkedList.getFirst();//current node
        Link currentK = linkedList.getFirst();//node at index k

        int counter = 0;

        while(current.getNext()!=null)
        {
            counter++;

            if(counter>=k)
            {
                currentK = currentK.getNext();
            }

            current = current.getNext();
        }

        //reached end
        return currentK;
    }
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I have my recursive solution at another thread in StackOverflow here

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No you dont know the length of the linkedlist ... You will have to go through once to get length of the likedlist so your approach is little in efficient;

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Recursive solution:

Node findKth (Node head, int count, int k) {
    if(head == null)
        return head;
    else {
        Node n =findKth(head.next,count,k);
        count++;

        if(count == k)
            return head;

        return n;
    }
}
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Just reverse the linked list in linear time and find the kth element. It still run in linear time.

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You can just loop through the linkedlist and get the size. Once you have the size you can find the n'th term in 2n which is O(n) still.

public T nthToLast(int n) {
    // return null if linkedlist is empty
    if (head == null) return null;

    // declare placeholder where size of linkedlist will be stored
    // we are hoping that size of linkedlist is less than MAX of INT
    // we could use Long instead
    int size = 0;

    // This is O(n) for sure
    Node i = head;
    while (i.next != null) {
        size += 1;
        i = i.next;
    }

    // if user chose something outside the size of the linkedlist return null
    if (size < n)
        return null;

    // This is O(n) if n == size
    i = head;
    while(size > n) {
        size--;
        i = i.next;
    }

    // Time complexity = n + n = 2n
    // therefore O(n)

    return i.value;
}
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We take here two pointers pNode and qNode, both initial points to head qNode. Then, traverse till the end of list and the pNode will only traverse when there's a difference between the count and position is greater than 0 and pthNode increments once in each loop.

static ListNode nthNode(int pos){
ListNode pNode=head;
ListNode qNode=head;
int count =0;
while(qNode!=null){
    count++;
    if(count - pos > 0)
        pNode=pNode.next;
    qNode=qNode.next;
}
return pNode;
}
share|improve this answer
public int nthFromLast(int n){
    Node current = head;
    Node reference = head;      
    for(int i=0;i<n;i++){
        reference=reference.getNext();
    }
    while(reference != null){
        current = current.getNext();
        reference = reference.getNext();
    }
    return current.getData();
}
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You can also solve the above problem using hash tables.The entries of the hash table are position of node and address of node. So if we want to find the nth node from the end(this means m-n+1 from the first where m is number of nodes).Now when we enter the hash table entries we get the number of nodes.Steps are:-

1.Traverse each node and make corresponding entries in hash table.

2.Look for the m-n+1 node in hash table we get the address.

Time complexity is O(n).

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I think there is one flaw in the question code, and I wonder if its been taken from a book how is this possible... it may execute correctly but code is somewhat logically incorrect. Inside the for loop... the if condition should be checked against p2->next ! = NULL

 for (int j = 0; j < n - 1; ++j) { // skip n-1 steps ahead
       if (p2->next == null) {
       return null; // not found since list size < n
   }

...rest is fine and explanation as given already the code shifts p2 (n-1) positions advance to p1, then in while loop it move them simultaneously till p2->next reaches the end .. fell free to tell if you find my answer incorrect

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The problem given in the career cup book is slightly different. It says find the nth to last element of a singly linked list.

Here is my code:

    public void findntolast(int index)
    {
        Node ptr = front; int count = 0;
        while(ptr!=null)
        {
            count++;
            if (count == index)
            {
                front = ptr;
                break;
            }
            ptr = ptr.next;
        }
        Node temp=front;
        while(temp!=null)
        {
            Console.WriteLine(temp.data);
            temp=temp.next;
        }
    }
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can you use extra data structure .. if so it will be simple ... start pushing all the nodes to a stack, maintain a counter a pop it. as per your example, 8->10->5->7->2->1->5->4->10->10 start reading the linked list and start pushing the nodes or the node->data onto a stack. so the stack will look like top->{10, 10,4, 5, 1, 2, 7, 5, 10, 8}<-bottom.

now start popping from the top of the stack maintaining a counter=1 and every time you pop increase the counter by 1, when you reach n-th element (in your example 7th element) stop popping.

note: this will print or retrieve the data/nodes in reverse order

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Here is the code using 2 pointer approach : ( source )

Slow and Faster pointer approach

struct node
{
  int data;
  struct node *next;
}mynode;


mynode * nthNodeFrmEnd(mynode *head, int n /*pass 0 for last node*/)
{
  mynode *ptr1,*ptr2;
  int count;

  if(!head)
  {
    return(NULL);
  }

  ptr1  = head;
  ptr2  = head;
  count = 0;

  while(count < n)
  {
     count++;
     if((ptr1=ptr1->next)==NULL)
     {
        //Length of the linked list less than n. Error.
        return(NULL);
     }
  }

  while((ptr1=ptr1->next)!=NULL)
  {
    ptr2=ptr2->next;
  }

  return(ptr2);
}


Recursion

node* findNthNode (node* head, int find, int& found){
    if(!head) {
        found = 1;
        return 0;
    }
    node* retval = findNthNode(head->next, find, found);
    if(found==find)
        retval = head;
    found = found + 1;
    return retval;
}

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Use two pointer pTemp and NthNode. Initially, both points to head node of the list. NthNode starts moving only after pTemp made n moves. From the both moves forward until pTemp reaches end of the list. As a result NthNode points to nth node from the end of the linked list.

public ListNode NthNodeFromEnd(int n){
    ListNode pTemp = head, NthNode = null;
   for(int count=1; count<n;count++){
     if(pTemp!=null){
       pTemp = pTemp.getNext();
     }
   }
   while(pTemp!=null){
     if(NthNode==null){
         NthNode = head;
     }
     else{
        NthNode = NthNode.getNext();
     }
     pTemp = pTemp.getNext();
   }
   if(NthNode!=null){
     NthNode = NthNode.getNext();
     return NthNode;
   }
return null;
}

Refer TextBook : "Data Structure and Algorithms Made Easy in Java"

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HERE IS WHAT I HAVE IMPLEMENTED USING STACK.

NODE nthNODE(NODE root,int n){
  NODE temp;
  int i, pos=0,item;
  if(root  ==  NULL) 
   printf("NO NODES TO BE DISPLAYED \n");
  else{
    temp = root;
    while(temp!=NULL){ 
      push(temp->data);
      temp = temp->link;
      pos++;
    } 
    for(i=0;i< pos;i++){
      item=pop();
      if(i==n-1){
       printf("THE %d ELEMENT FROM LAST ELEMETN IS %d\n",n,item);
      }
    }
   }
  return root;
}
int pop()
{ 
 int item;
 top = top-1;
 item = s[top];
 return item;
}
int push(int temp)
{ 
s[top++]=temp;
}
share|improve this answer
    
Care to explain what this unformatted block of code adds new to this 5 year old question that already has an accpeted answer? –  fancyPants Apr 16 at 13:47

In java i will use-

public class LL {
  Node head;
  int linksCount;

   LL(){
     head = new Node();
     linksCount = 0;
   }

  //TRAVERSE TO INDEX
  public Node getNodeAt(int index){
    Node temp= head;
    if(index > linksCount){
        System.out.println("index out of bound !");
        return null;
    }
    for(int i=0;i<index && (temp.getNext() != null);i++){
        temp = temp.getNext();
    }
    return temp.getNext();
  }
}
share|improve this answer

my approach, what i think is simple and has time complexity O(n).

Step 1: First get the count of number of nodes. Run a for loop starting from first node to the last node

Step 2: Once you have the count, apply simple math, for example if we have find 7th node to the last node and the count of all nodes is 12, then (count - index)- 1 will give some kth node, upto which you will have to traverse and it will be the nth node to the last node. In this case (12 -7)-1 = 4

If the elements are 8->10->5->7->2->1->5->4->10->10 then the result is 7th to last node is 7, which is nothing but 4th node from the beginning.

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