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I wonder how to label each equation in align environment? For example

\begin{align} \label{eq:lnnonspbb}
\lambda_i + \mu_i = 0 \\
\mu_i \xi_i = 0 \\
\lambda_i [y_i( w^T x_i + b) - 1 + \xi_i] = 0
\end{align} 

only label the first equation and only the first equation can be referred later.

Thanks and regards!

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up vote 60 down vote accepted

You can label each line separately, in your case:

\begin{align}
  \lambda_i + \mu_i = 0 \label{eq:1}\\
  \mu_i \xi_i = 0 \label{eq:2}\\
  \lambda_i [y_i( w^T x_i + b) - 1 + \xi_i] = 0 \label{eq:3}
\end{align} 

Note that this only works for AMS environments that are designed for multiple equations (as opposed to multiline single equations).

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What do you mean by "AMS environments that are designed for multiple equations (as opposed to multiline single equations)"? – jvriesem Feb 5 at 18:04
1  
@jvriesem: the environment align is meant for multiple equations. Each equation will receive a number. If you use an equation environment, and put an aligned environment inside it, the whole block is considered as one equation, and will receive one number. Putting multiple \labels inside it will result in errors – Martijn Feb 6 at 10:50

Usually my align environments are set up like

\begin{align} 
  \label{eqn1}
  \lambda_i + \mu_i = 0 \\
  \label{eqn2}
  \mu_i \xi_i = 0 \\
  \label{eqn3}
  \lambda_i [y_i( w^T x_i + b) - 1 + \xi_i] = 0
\end{align} 

The \label command should be placed in the line you want to reference, the placement in the line does not matter. I prefer to place it at the beginning at the line (as a sort of description) while others place them at the end.

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Your code will produce errors because all the labels are the same. – Rob Hyndman Apr 9 '10 at 2:11
    
#Rob I have changed the identifiers, such that they are all different. – midtiby Apr 9 '10 at 6:56

like this

\begin{align} 

x_{\rm L} & = L \int{\cos\theta\left(\xi\right) d\xi}, \label{eq_1} \\\\

y_{\rm L} & = L \int{\sin\theta\left(\xi\right) d\xi}, \nonumber

\end{align}
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