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Given an item, how can I count its occurrences in a list in Python?

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11 Answers 11

up vote 660 down vote accepted
>>> [1, 2, 3, 4, 1, 4, 1].count(1)
3
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2  
So beautiful. Ahh. – Duke Dougal Apr 22 at 1:07

If you are using Python 2.7 or 3 and you want number of occurrences for each element:

>>> from collections import Counter
>>> z = ['blue', 'red', 'blue', 'yellow', 'blue', 'red']
>>> Counter(z)
Counter({'blue': 3, 'red': 2, 'yellow': 1})
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44  
+1 for collections, amazingly underused – danodonovan Jun 11 '12 at 13:22
37  
Counter(z).most_common(n) will list elements and counts as tuples in decreasing order, where n is the number of elements to list. Omit n to list everything. – davidjb Apr 2 '14 at 0:24
17  
sometimes scrolling down really pays off. thanks! – multiphrenic Apr 11 '14 at 17:26
7  
If you just want the values and not the keys, do this: Counter(z).values() – Stefan Gruenwald May 25 '14 at 1:13
5  
... obligatory "This should be the accepted answer" – snakesNbronies Jun 12 '15 at 4:57

Counting the occurrences of one item in a list

For counting the occurrences of just one list item you can use count()

>>> l = ["a","b","b"]
>>> l.count("a")
1
>>> l.count("b")
2

Counting the occurrences of all items in a list is also known as "tallying" a list, or creating a tally counter.

Counting all items with count()

To count the occurrences of items in l one can simply use a list comprehension and the count() method

[[x,l.count(x)] for x in set(l)]

(or similarly with a dictionary dict((x,l.count(x)) for x in set(l)))

Example:

>>> l = ["a","b","b"]
>>> [[x,l.count(x)] for x in set(l)]
[['a', 1], ['b', 2]]
>>> dict((x,l.count(x)) for x in set(l))
{'a': 1, 'b': 2}

Counting all items with Counter()

Alternatively, there's the faster Counter class from the collections library

Counter(l)

Example:

>>> l = ["a","b","b"]
>>> from collections import Counter
>>> Counter(l)
Counter({'b': 2, 'a': 1})

How much faster is Counter?

I checked how much faster Counter is for tallying lists. I tried both methods out with a few values of n and it appears that Counter is faster by a constant factor of approximately 2.

Here is the script I used:

import timeit

t1=timeit.Timer('Counter(l)', \
                'import random;import string;from collections import Counter;n=1000;l=[random.choice(string.ascii_letters) for x in xrange(n)]'
                )

t2=timeit.Timer('[[x,l.count(x)] for x in set(l)]',
                'import random;import string;n=1000;l=[random.choice(string.ascii_letters) for x in xrange(n)]'
                )

print "Counter(): ", t1.repeat(repeat=3,number=10000)
print "count():   ", t2.repeat(repeat=3,number=10000)

And the output:

Counter():  [6.360648187146579, 6.613881559699756, 6.392260466851987]
count():    [12.885062765334006, 13.045601897769359, 12.87746743077426]
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Did you check how Counter was implemented? – Jeremy D Dec 19 '14 at 4:53
4  
Counter is way faster for bigger lists. The list comprehension method is O(n^2), Counter should be O(log n). – fhucho Nov 11 '15 at 22:34

Another way to get the number of occurrences of each item, in a dictionary:

dict((i, a.count(i)) for i in a)
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26  
this looks like one of the constructs I often come up with in the heat of the battle, but it will run through a len(a) times which means quadratic runtime complexity (as each run depends on len(a) again). – Nicolas78 Oct 10 '12 at 0:30
    
Very beautiful, thank you! – Michael Dorner Jan 6 '13 at 15:50
1  
would dict((i,a.count(i)) for i in set(a)) be more correct and faster? – hugo24 Aug 23 '13 at 9:20
2  
@hugo24: A bit, but it won't be asymptotically faster in the worst case; it will take n * (number of different items) operations, not counting the time it takes to build the set. Using collections.Counter is really much better. – Clément Oct 7 '13 at 9:46

list.count(x) returns the number of times x appears in a list

see: http://docs.python.org/tutorial/datastructures.html#more-on-lists

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This is better than the accepted answer, because it tells what .count() does and also links to the doc. – LarsH Apr 22 '15 at 13:37

If you want to count all values at once you can do it very fast using numpy arrays and bincount as follows

import numpy as np
a = np.array([1, 2, 3, 4, 1, 4, 1])
np.bincount(a)

which gives

>>> array([0, 3, 1, 1, 2])
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# Python >= 2.6 (defaultdict) && < 2.7 (Counter, OrderedDict)
from collections import defaultdict
def count_unsorted_list_items(items):
    """
    :param items: iterable of hashable items to count
    :type items: iterable

    :returns: dict of counts like Py2.7 Counter
    :rtype: dict
    """
    counts = defaultdict(int)
    for item in items:
        counts[item] += 1
    return dict(counts)


# Python >= 2.2 (generators)
def count_sorted_list_items(items):
    """
    :param items: sorted iterable of items to count
    :type items: sorted iterable

    :returns: generator of (item, count) tuples
    :rtype: generator
    """
    if not items:
        return
    elif len(items) == 1:
        yield (items[0], 1)
        return
    prev_item = items[0]
    count = 1
    for item in items[1:]:
        if prev_item == item:
            count += 1
        else:
            yield (prev_item, count)
            count = 1
            prev_item = item
    yield (item, count)
    return


import unittest
class TestListCounters(unittest.TestCase):
    def test_count_unsorted_list_items(self):
        D = (
            ([], []),
            ([2], [(2,1)]),
            ([2,2], [(2,2)]),
            ([2,2,2,2,3,3,5,5], [(2,4), (3,2), (5,2)]),
            )
        for inp, exp_outp in D:
            counts = count_unsorted_list_items(inp) 
            print inp, exp_outp, counts
            self.assertEqual(counts, dict( exp_outp ))

        inp, exp_outp = UNSORTED_WIN = ([2,2,4,2], [(2,3), (4,1)])
        self.assertEqual(dict( exp_outp ), count_unsorted_list_items(inp) )


    def test_count_sorted_list_items(self):
        D = (
            ([], []),
            ([2], [(2,1)]),
            ([2,2], [(2,2)]),
            ([2,2,2,2,3,3,5,5], [(2,4), (3,2), (5,2)]),
            )
        for inp, exp_outp in D:
            counts = list( count_sorted_list_items(inp) )
            print inp, exp_outp, counts
            self.assertEqual(counts, exp_outp)

        inp, exp_outp = UNSORTED_FAIL = ([2,2,4,2], [(2,3), (4,1)])
        self.assertEqual(exp_outp, list( count_sorted_list_items(inp) ))
        # ... [(2,2), (4,1), (2,1)]
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9  
This is a bit "enterprisey"... – plaes Aug 14 '11 at 8:58
1  
@Wes Turner Happily, you use Python. Imagine the same in Java or C.... – eyquem Aug 14 '11 at 15:40
2  
@plaes : How so? If by 'enterprisey', you mean "documented" in preparation for Py3k annotations, I agree. – Wes Turner Aug 21 '11 at 12:32
1  
This is a great example, as I am developing mainly in 2.7, but have to have migration paths to 2.4. – Adam Lewis Feb 27 '13 at 21:06

I had this problem today and rolled my own solution before I thought to check SO. This:

dict((i,a.count(i)) for i in a)

is really, really slow for large lists. My solution

def occurDict(items):
    d = {}
    for i in items:
        if i in d:
            d[i] = d[i]+1
        else:
            d[i] = 1
return d

is actually a bit faster than the Counter solution, at least for Python 2.7.

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Counter sorts the entries while yours does not, hence the speed difference (True at the time of writing, not sure if it was when you wrote the answer. Still, it might be relevant for someone scrolling down.) – chaosflaws Jun 8 '15 at 21:29

To count the number of diverse elements having a common type:

li = ['A0','c5','A8','A2','A5','c2','A3','A9']

print sum(1 for el in li if el[0]=='A' and el[1] in '01234')

gives

3 , not 6

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Given an item, how can I count its occurrences in a list in Python?

>>> l = list('aaaaabbbbcccdde')
>>> l
['a', 'a', 'a', 'a', 'a', 'b', 'b', 'b', 'b', 'c', 'c', 'c', 'd', 'd', 'e']

list.count

There's the list.count method

>>> l.count('b')
4

collections.Counter

And then there's collections.Counter. Usage:

>>> from collections import Counter
>>> c = Counter(l)
>>> c['b']
4

Further usage of collections.Counter

You can add or subtract with iterables from your counter:

>>> c.update(list('bbb'))
>>> c['b']
7
>>> c.subtract(list('bbb'))
>>> c['b']
4

And you can do multi-set operations with the counter as well:

>>> c2 = Counter(list('aabbxyz'))
>>> c - c2                   # set difference
Counter({'a': 3, 'c': 3, 'b': 2, 'd': 2, 'e': 1})
>>> c + c2                   # addition of all elements
Counter({'a': 7, 'b': 6, 'c': 3, 'd': 2, 'e': 1, 'y': 1, 'x': 1, 'z': 1})
>>> c | c2                   # set union
Counter({'a': 5, 'b': 4, 'c': 3, 'd': 2, 'e': 1, 'y': 1, 'x': 1, 'z': 1})
>>> c & c2                   # set intersection
Counter({'a': 2, 'b': 2})
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I use if x in [] to test for the existence of values, count is meant for another purpose, and for huge lists it's also faster than count. It returns True or False:

Edit: Sorry, I misunderstood your question, my bad.

>>> lst = [1, 2, 3, 4, 5]
>>> 3 in lst
True
>>> 9 in lst
False
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