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It seems that these two operators are pretty much the same - is there a difference? When should I use = and when ==?

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up vote 46 down vote accepted

You must use == in numeric comparisons in (( ... )):

$ if (( 3 == 3 )); then echo "yes"; fi
yes
$ if (( 3 = 3 ));  then echo "yes"; fi
bash: ((: 3 = 3 : attempted assignment to non-variable (error token is "= 3 ")

You may use either for string comparisons in [[ ... ]] or [ ... ] or test:

$ if [[ 3 == 3 ]]; then echo "yes"; fi
yes
$ if [[ 3 = 3 ]]; then echo "yes"; fi
yes
$ if [ 3 == 3 ]; then echo "yes"; fi
yes
$ if [ 3 = 3 ]; then echo "yes"; fi
yes
$ if test 3 == 3; then echo "yes"; fi
yes
$ if test 3 = 3; then echo "yes"; fi
yes

"String comparisons?", you say?

$ if [[ 10 < 2 ]]; then echo "yes"; fi    # string comparison
yes
$ if (( 10 < 2 )); then echo "yes"; else echo "no"; fi    # numeric comparison
no
$ if [[ 10 -lt 2 ]]; then echo "yes"; else echo "no"; fi  # numeric comparison
no
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2  
+1 for String comparison section. Much obliged. :-) – LIttle Ancient Forest Kami Apr 14 '14 at 7:00
    
You should not use == with [ or test, though. == is not part of the POSIX specification, and will not work with all shells (dash, in particular, does not recognize it). – chepner Nov 10 '15 at 19:39
    
@chepner: That's true, but the question is specifically about Bash. – Dennis Williamson Nov 10 '15 at 20:01

There's a subtle difference with regards to POSIX. Excerpt from the Bash reference:

string1 == string2
True if the strings are equal. = may be used in place of == for strict POSIX compliance.

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2  
+1 for finding a difference! – Dominic Rodger Apr 8 '10 at 14:01
    
No difference in bash though? Just a portability issue? – T.E.D. Apr 8 '10 at 14:11
    
@T.E.D.: No, see my answer. – Dennis Williamson Apr 8 '10 at 16:19

I've never run into problems using = for comparisons, but then again I use -eq, -ne, -lt, -le, -gt, and -ge for numeric comparisons.

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