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I am building a hash where the keys, associated with scalars, are not necessarily unique. The desired behavior to be that if the key is unique, the value is the scalar. If the key is not unique, I want the value to be an array reference of the scalars associated witht the key. Since the hash is built up iteratively, I don't know if the key is unique ahead of time. Right now, I am doing something like this:

if(!defined($hash{$key})){
   $hash{$key} = $val;
}
elseif(ref($hash{$key}) ne 'ARRAY'){
   my @a;
   push(@a, $hash{$key});
   push(@, $val);
   $hash{$key} = \@a;
}
else{
   push(@{$hash{$key}}, $val);
}

Is there a simpler way to do this?

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8  
From a maintainability and simplicity standpoint, isn't it easier to assume that all keys are non-unique, and make every key an arrayref? Even if that arrayref contains one element? Translates to less if ( ref $x eq 'ARRAY') boilerplate all over the place. –  rjh Apr 8 '10 at 15:43
    
@rjh this is a very fair point. I need to think about how this will play out in the larger picture for my particular case, but I agree it makes sense in general. It is simialr to how R handles things. This is part of a more complicated structure and duplicate keys are fairly uncommon. I am going to think about it. –  frankc Apr 8 '10 at 16:25
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2 Answers

up vote 5 down vote accepted

rjh is right on the money.

I have written way too much code that does exactly what you describe--the hash value is an array ref unless it isn't. Reams and reams of conditional type checking. Then one day it hit me, "Why am I writing all this crap? Just use an array ref everywhere, dummy" I said to myself. Since that day bluebirds fly down from the trees to sing to me whenever I walk in the park.

push @{$hash{$key}}, $val;

That's all you have to do. If the key does not exist, the array is autovivified.

If you don't like autoviv, and want to be explicit do:

$hash{$key} = [] unless exists $hash{$key};
push @{$hash{$key}}, $val;

Even this 'verbose' approach is much shorter.

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1  
Am I the only one to immediately imagine the scene from Shrek where the bluebird and Fiona sing and the bird explodes? :) –  DVK Apr 8 '10 at 17:13
    
Wow, I didn't know that even an arrayref dereference would be autovivified. So I no longer have to do @{ $hash{$key} ||= [] } ... neat! –  rjh Apr 8 '10 at 17:41
    
This is old question but I'm curious why use an arrayref at all? Why not just hashref? –  vol7ron Jan 30 '12 at 19:40
    
@vol7ron, if you want to have multiple values in your hash, you need to use a type of scalar that can store multiple values. This leaves you with array refs, hash refs or some kind of serialization scheme to manage the multiples. Depending on how you are using the multiple values, it may make sense to use a Hash of Hashes instead of a Hash of Arrays. In this case, the OP was asking about a Hash of Scalars or Arrays. I suggested using a consistent structure to save complexity. This advice applies whatever elements you choose to compose your data structure. –  daotoad Feb 1 '12 at 22:13
    
@daotoad: that's right, I mean I've done HoA's, but HoH can be abused to serve all purposes. I mean it's really easy to create a $hash->{$key}->{$index} = 'foo' to serve the same structure of a multidimensional array, where index is equal to count of keys in $hash->{$key} or 0. If order is important, simply add another dimension :) I just find HoHs to be super flexible, but again, maybe I abuse it. –  vol7ron Feb 1 '12 at 22:33
show 2 more comments
if(!defined($hash{$key})){
    $hash{$key} = $val;
}
elsif (ref($hash{$key}) ne 'ARRAY') {
    $hash{$key} = [ $hash{$key}, $val ];
}
else{
   push(@{$hash{$key}}, $val);
}
share|improve this answer
1  
You should really use exists in your first conditional -- there's a chance that undef might show up in $hash{$key}, in which case your final condition would clobber it. –  friedo Apr 8 '10 at 17:56
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