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Why would one use a functional language in an otherwise Imperative project?

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What is "an ... Imperative project"? Do you mean that large parts of the project are already coded in an imperative language? Or do you mean the project definition is somehow "imperative" in nature? –  MtnViewMark Apr 13 '10 at 1:27

6 Answers 6

up vote 2 down vote accepted

If your project is truly imperative, you probably don't want a purely functional language. But you probably still want a language with functional features; functional style addresses low-level code structure in the same way that object-oriented style addresses high-level structure. Both allow you to package certain common patterns in a language-supported way.

In a primarily imperative project, functional style is useful at the expression and statement level, allowing you to abstract common loops and sequences:

For example, take this common pattern:

newlist = []
for x in oldlist:
    y = dosomething(x)
    newlist.append(y)

That's map:

 newlist = map(dosomething, oldlist)

Or this:

total = 1
for n in numbers:
    total = total * n

Becomes fold (also known as reduce):

total = fold(*, 1, numbers)

Imperative style does not address this low-level duplication all that well--hence the "I wish I had a nickel for every time I typed for(int i = 0; ...)". Even in OO languages without functional features, code inside methods doesn't differ much from similar non-OO languages.

Some IDEs for address this by providing code snippets. This addresses the lack of abstraction power in the wrong way. The way to handle a repeated pattern is not to encourage cut-and-paste with little holes for variable names, but to abstract the pattern into a reusable unit.

Note: I addressed embedding functional code in an imperative project. A top-to-bottom project in functional style will look different. Here are some links taken from similar Stack Overflow questions:

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2  
Not to mention 'filter'. I spent so much time writing for loops to filter collections. And now I have languages which let me do List(1, 2, 3, 4).filter(x => x > 3) type stuff. Once you have that kind of map/fold/reduce/foreach power, you never want to go back. –  Tom Morris Apr 14 '10 at 11:38

Many tasks are inherently addressed by functional concepts, such as composable calculations. It is feasible that you will encounter these kinds of problems in projects which have otherwise been developed in an object-oriented fashion.

The best tool for a job is independent of that tool's dominant paradigm.

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Would you care to give an example from you're own experience? –  Ross Charette Apr 8 '10 at 17:14
2  
A common problem faced by application developers is building queries: "I want all customers over the age of 18 who have spent $10K in the past year." The process of defining a query that returns all customers, then filtering it by one criterion, then another, and finally a third, is called composing the query. Composition is a strong suit of a functional approach, meaning the query definition problem and a functional solution are well-matched. To see this in action in a popular object-oriented language, see C# and LINQ. –  Bryan Watts Apr 8 '10 at 18:05
    
+1 for the comment. That's the best part of the answer! –  Jeffrey L Whitledge Apr 8 '10 at 18:18

Many methods in languages like Java and C++ could be written in a more readable and dense form using FP concepts such as higher-order functions, currying, closures, etc.

See Scala for many interesting examples.

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Probably, the most common reason - is to localise and restrict the imperative part (i.e., potentially dangerous and harder to debug, analyse and maintain).

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A common problem faced by application developers is building queries: "I want all customers over the age of 18 who have spent $10K in the past year." The process of defining a query that returns all customers, then filtering it by one criterion, then another, and finally a third, is called composing the query. Composition is a strong suit of a functional approach, meaning the query definition problem and a functional solution are well-matched. To see this in action in a popular object-oriented language, see C# and LINQ

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Why would one use a functional language in an otherwise Imperative project?

Some examples:

The Mathematica kernel is written in a proprietary dialect of C. Mathematica is a functional language so it makes it much easier to implement many mathematical algorithms and, consequently, it became the language of choice for implementing large parts of Mathematica itself. Retrospectively, this was a huge success as it made it possible to implement many more algorithms quickly and cheaply using a more expressive language.

Joule is a front-end GUI app for traders from the market leader of European energy trading. Although most of the lines of code in Joule are C# they chose to implement some parts of it in F#. In particular, the implied prices engine that combines real bids and asks across related contracts to create implicit bids and asks was written entirely in F#. Retrospectively, this was a huge success as it replaced a substantial (~50kLOC) C++ code base with a comparatively tiny (~1kLOC) F# code base that does the same thing more quickly. The author of Joule's implied prices engine wrote a related article here.

Microsoft's Halo 3 computer game and Bing search engine both have some of their dense mathematical code written in Microsoft's own functional language F#.

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