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I find myself using the current pattern quite often in my code nowadays

var dictionary = new Dictionary<type, IList<othertype>>();
// Add stuff to dictionary

var somethingElse = dictionary.ContainsKey(key) ? dictionary[key] : new List<othertype>();
// Do work with the somethingelse variable

Or sometimes

var dictionary = new Dictionary<type, IList<othertype>>();
// Add stuff to dictionary

IList<othertype> somethingElse;
if(!dictionary.TryGetValue(key, out somethingElse) {
    somethingElse = new List<othertype>();
}

Both of these ways feel quite roundabout. What I really would like is something like

dictionary.GetValueOrDefault(key)

Now, I could write an extension method for the dictionary class that does this for me, but I figured that I might be missing something that already exists. SO, is there a way to do this in a way that is more "easy on the eyes" without writing an extension method to dictionary?

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marked as duplicate by nawfal, Peter O., A. Rodas, axel_c, Regexident Apr 7 '13 at 18:05

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

4 Answers 4

up vote 88 down vote accepted

TryGetValue will already assign the default value for the type to the dictionary, so you can just use:

dictionary.TryGetValue(key, out value);

and just ignore the return value. However, that really will just return default(TValue), not some custom default value (nor, more usefully, the result of executing a delegate). There's nothing more powerful built into the framework. I would suggest two extension methods:

public static TValue GetValueOrDefault<TKey, TValue>
    (this IDictionary<TKey, TValue> dictionary, 
     TKey key,
     TValue defaultValue)
{
    TValue value;
    return dictionary.TryGetValue(key, out value) ? value : defaultValue;
}

public static TValue GetValueOrDefault<TKey, TValue>
    (this IDictionary<TKey, TValue> dictionary,
     TKey key,
     Func<TValue> defaultValueProvider)
{
    TValue value;
    return dictionary.TryGetValue(key, out value) ? value
         : defaultValueProvider();
}

(You may want to put argument checking in, of course :)

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3  
Also, you missed actually passing the key into the methods :) Still, I guess there's just no way around it. I'll have to go the extension method route (or learn to live with the boilerplate code). Thanks! –  wasatz Apr 8 '10 at 16:17
2  
Whoops - will fix :) –  Jon Skeet Apr 8 '10 at 16:40
    
To open a can of worms, these extensions work when key doesn't exist, but TryGetValue throws if key is null. Knowing whether key is nullable or not would make this a trivial check. –  ProfK Sep 27 '12 at 6:12
1  
@ProfK: Right - it makes sense to change the code for your particular case then, but I wouldn't want to propose it in general :) –  Jon Skeet Sep 27 '12 at 10:29
3  
Thanks for this. How about a default value for 3rd arg? TValue defaultValue = default(TValue) –  crokusek Nov 9 '12 at 2:55

I created a DefaultableDictionary to do exactly what you are asking for!

using System;
using System.Collections;
using System.Collections.Generic;
using System.Collections.ObjectModel;

namespace DefaultableDictionary {
    public class DefaultableDictionary<TKey, TValue> : IDictionary<TKey, TValue> {
        private readonly IDictionary<TKey, TValue> dictionary;
        private readonly TValue defaultValue;

        public DefaultableDictionary(IDictionary<TKey, TValue> dictionary, TValue defaultValue) {
            this.dictionary = dictionary;
            this.defaultValue = defaultValue;
        }

        public IEnumerator<KeyValuePair<TKey, TValue>> GetEnumerator() {
            return dictionary.GetEnumerator();
        }

        IEnumerator IEnumerable.GetEnumerator() {
            return GetEnumerator();
        }

        public void Add(KeyValuePair<TKey, TValue> item) {
            dictionary.Add(item);
        }

        public void Clear() {
            dictionary.Clear();
        }

        public bool Contains(KeyValuePair<TKey, TValue> item) {
            return dictionary.Contains(item);
        }

        public void CopyTo(KeyValuePair<TKey, TValue>[] array, int arrayIndex) {
            dictionary.CopyTo(array, arrayIndex);
        }

        public bool Remove(KeyValuePair<TKey, TValue> item) {
            return dictionary.Remove(item);
        }

        public int Count {
            get { return dictionary.Count; }
        }

        public bool IsReadOnly {
            get { return dictionary.IsReadOnly; }
        }

        public bool ContainsKey(TKey key) {
            return dictionary.ContainsKey(key);
        }

        public void Add(TKey key, TValue value) {
            dictionary.Add(key, value);
        }

        public bool Remove(TKey key) {
            return dictionary.Remove(key);
        }

        public bool TryGetValue(TKey key, out TValue value) {
            if (!dictionary.TryGetValue(key, out value)) {
                value = defaultValue;
            }

            return true;
        }

        public TValue this[TKey key] {
            get
            {
                try
                {
                    return dictionary[key];
                } catch (KeyNotFoundException) {
                    return defaultValue;
                }
            }

            set { dictionary[key] = value; }
        }

        public ICollection<TKey> Keys {
            get { return dictionary.Keys; }
        }

        public ICollection<TValue> Values {
            get
            {
                var values = new List<TValue>(dictionary.Values) {
                    defaultValue
                };
                return values;
            }
        }
    }

    public static class DefaultableDictionaryExtensions {
        public static IDictionary<TKey, TValue> WithDefaultValue<TValue, TKey>(this IDictionary<TKey, TValue> dictionary, TValue defaultValue ) {
            return new DefaultableDictionary<TKey, TValue>(dictionary, defaultValue);
        }
    }
}

This project is a simple decorator for an IDictionary object and an extension method to make it easy to use.

The DefaultableDictionary will allow for creating a wrapper around a dictionary that provides a default value when trying to access a key that does not exist or enumerating through all the values in an IDictionary.

Example: var dictionary = new Dictionary<string, int>().WithDefaultValue(5);

Blog post on the usage as well.

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Please provide the context supporting the github link directly in your answer, or it will likely be removed. –  Tim Post Aug 15 '11 at 6:28
2  
Would be helpful if you didn't delete the links that provided clarity as well. –  John Sonmez Aug 15 '11 at 13:45
2  
I'd write the index getter as: public TValue this[TKey key] { get { TValue value; TryGetValue(key, out value); return value; } To avoid the exception handling. –  James Curran Jun 28 '12 at 13:37
1  
I like that you used an extension method to create the default dictionary instead of requiring your constructor be used (as I did). –  roberocity Sep 19 '13 at 20:23

I know this is an old post and I do favor extension methods, but here's a simple class I use from time to time to handle dictionaries when I need default values.

I wish this were just part of the base Dictionary class.

public class DictionaryWithDefault<TKey, TValue> : Dictionary<TKey, TValue>
{
  TValue _default;
  public TValue DefaultValue {
    get { return _default; }
    set { _default = value; }
  }
  public DictionaryWithDefault() : base() { }
  public DictionaryWithDefault(TValue defaultValue) : base() {
    _default = defaultValue;
  }
  public new TValue this[TKey key]
  {
    get { 
      TValue t = _default;
      base.TryGetValue(key, out t);
      return t;
    }
    set { base[key] = value; }
  }
}
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That's a bit nicer. Thanks! –  CJxD Apr 6 '12 at 13:47
    
Use trygetvalue better.. –  nawfal Mar 30 '13 at 21:18
1  
@roberocity yes a performance advantage, see this: stackoverflow.com/questions/9382681/… –  nawfal Sep 20 '13 at 11:36
1  
There is a bug in the above code. It will always return 0 as default value, because TryGetValue sets "t" to 0. Change to; TValue t; if (!TryGetValue(key, out t)) { t = m_default; } return t; –  Manuel Amstutz Oct 31 '13 at 13:59
1  
I think it is ill-advised to inherit from Dictionary in this case: by using the new keyword you are hiding the non-virtual Item property. If someone was to access it from a Dictionary reference type, and not a DictionaryWithDefault, it is Dictionary's Item property that would be called, not yours. –  bavaza Feb 6 at 9:07

No, nothing like that exists. The extension method is the way to go, and your name for it (GetValueOrDefault) is a pretty good choice.

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