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is it possible to define a regex pattern which checks eg. for 3 terms independent to their position in the main string?

eg. my string is something like "click here to unsubscribe: http://www.url.com"

the pattern should also work with "http:// unsubscribe click"

thx

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Any particular reason it would have to be done with one regex? –  Jørn Schou-Rode Apr 8 '10 at 16:48
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It would be useful to know what language you're working in. Different programming languages support different regex syntaxes. –  me_and Apr 8 '10 at 17:45
    
How are you using this regex? The answer will be very different depending on whether you're validating a short string, or searching for this string in a much larger text such as a web page. –  Alan Moore Apr 8 '10 at 21:25

3 Answers 3

You can use positive lookaheads. For example,

(?=.*click)(?=.*unsubscribe).*http

is a regex that will look ahead from the current position (without moving ahead) for click, then for unsubscribe, then search normally for http.

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That only works if both "click" and "unsubscribe" come after "http", which doesn't jibe with the OP's first example. –  Alan Moore Apr 8 '10 at 21:21
    
@Alan Moore: True. Corrected. –  me_and Apr 9 '10 at 9:43

It's possible, but results in very complicated regexs, e.g.:

/(click.*unsubscribe|unsubscribe.*click)/

Basically, you would need to have a different regex section for each order. Not ideal. Better to just use multiple regexes, one for each term.

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Or use "index" or equivalents three times. –  user181548 Apr 9 '10 at 2:42

Yes, using conditionals.

http://www.regular-expressions.info/conditional.html

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Can you provide more detail? I don't see how conditionals will help. –  Alan Moore Apr 8 '10 at 21:28

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