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I want to perform some action ONLY IF my string has a meaningful value. So, I tried this.

if (!myString.equals("")) {
doSomething
}

and this

if (!myString.equals(null)) {
doSomething
}

and this

if ( (!myString.equals("")) && (!myString.equals(null))) {
doSomething
}

and this

if ( (!myString.equals("")) && (myString!=null)) {
doSomething
}

and this

if ( myString.length()>0) {
doSomething
}

And in all cases my program doSomething in spite on the fact that my string IS EMPTY. It equals to null. So, what is wrong with that?

ADDED:

I found the reason of the problem. The variable was declared as a string and, as a consequence, null assigned to this variable was transformed to "null"! So, if (!myString.equals("null")) works.

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1  
null doesn't have any methods, so also not equals(). If myString were null, how would you ever invoke a method on it? :) –  BalusC Apr 8 '10 at 17:17
    
May I suggest that you System.out.println(myString) immediately before the if-block so you can see what's there? –  Michael Myers Apr 8 '10 at 17:22
    
How do you know that "it equals to null"? –  Richard JP Le Guen Apr 8 '10 at 17:24
4  
null assigned to this variable was transformed to "null" -- this is a terrible idea. Try to change this design if at all possible. –  polygenelubricants Apr 8 '10 at 17:40
7  
Yuck - I don't think checking whether (!myString.equals("null")) is the best solution. I suspect most would consider the point at which the string "null" was assigned to myString to be a bug. –  Bert F Apr 8 '10 at 17:41

14 Answers 14

if (myString != null && !myString.isEmpty()) {
  // doSomething
}

As further comment, you should be aware of this term in the equals contract:

From Object.equals(Object):

For any non-null reference value x, x.equals(null) should return false.

The way to compare with null is to use x == null and x != null.

Moreover, x.field and x.method() throws NullPointerException if x == null.

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1  
You should do length check as opposed to equals for efficiency purposes. Check this link hanuska.blogspot.com/2006/08/empty-string.html –  CoolBeans Apr 8 '10 at 17:33
5  
I would say you should do s.isEmpty() instead of s.length() == 0 for readability. Any difference in performance is negligible. I do agree that s.equals("") is terrible. –  polygenelubricants Apr 8 '10 at 17:36
5  
I agree on the readability. It depends whether we are using Java 5 vs Java 6 since isEmpty() is only in Java 6. –  CoolBeans Apr 8 '10 at 17:44
    
@CoolBeans: Good comment! I hadn't realized that! I'm a bit late to the Java party =) –  polygenelubricants Apr 8 '10 at 17:51

If myString is null, then calling myString.equals(null) or myString.equals("") will fail with a NullPointerException. You cannot call any instance methods on a null variable.

Check for null first like this:

if (myString != null && !myString.equals("")) {
    //do something
}

This makes use of short-circuit evaluation to not attempt the .equals if myString fails the null check.

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+1 for short-circuit; it's essential for the expression to work. However, you really should use .isEmpty() instead of .equals(""). –  polygenelubricants Apr 8 '10 at 17:42
1  
Okay I meant to leave my comment on this post. lol. -> " You should do length check as opposed to equals for efficiency purposes. Check this link hanuska.blogspot.com/2006/08/empty-string.html " –  CoolBeans Apr 8 '10 at 17:42
    
@CoolBeans: Sure, and with Java 6 you could even do myString.isEmpty(). But at this level, readability trumps optimization, and people might be more used to reading myString.equals(""). (Or possibly not.) –  Michael Myers Apr 8 '10 at 18:41

If myString is in fact null, then any call to the reference will fail with a Null Pointer Exception (NPE). Since java 6, use #isEmpty instead of length check (in any case NEVER create a new empty String with the check).

if (myString !=null &&  !myString.isEmpty()){
    doSomething();
}

Incidentally if comparing with String literals as you do, would reverse the statement so as not to have to have a null check, i.e,

if (("some string to check").equals(myString)){
  doSomething();
} 

instead of :

if (myString !=null &&  !myString.equals("some string to check")){
    doSomething();
}
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Good point, but last two ifs are not equivalent. With myString = "abc", the middle one does not call doSomething but the third one does. –  rimsky Jan 22 '13 at 22:23

Apache commons StringUtils.isNotEmpty is the best way to go.

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If your string is null, calls like this should throw a NullReferenceException:

myString.equals(null)

But anyway, I think a method like this is what you want:

public static class StringUtils
{
    public static bool isNullOrEmpty(String myString)
    {
         return myString == null || "".equals(myString);
    }
}

Then in your code, you can do things like this:

if (!StringUtils.isNullOrEmpty(myString))
{
    doSomething();
}
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You need to check that the myString object is null

if (myString != null) {
doSomething
}
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Try,

myString!=null && myString.length()>0
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this is not possible if myString is null –  hsmit Jan 6 '11 at 12:16
2  
this is pretty much possible when myString is null. You should know that when the left part of the && fails, the right expression will not be evaluated at all.. –  bragboy Jan 6 '11 at 20:07

if(str.isEmpty() || str==null){ do whatever you want }

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1  
isEmpty is reversed.. if you call method on null object, you get NPE –  staticx Aug 19 '13 at 14:15
 if (myString != null && myString.length() > 0) {

        // your magic here

 }

Incidently, if you are doing much string manipulation, there's a great Spring class with all sorts of useful methods:

http://static.springsource.org/spring/docs/2.5.x/api/org/springframework/util/StringUtils.html

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I would encourage using an existing utility, or creating your own method:

public static boolean isEmpty(String string) {
    return string == null || string.length() == 0;
}

Then just use it when you need it:

if (! StringUtils.isEmpty(string)) {
  // do something
}

As noted above, the || and && operators short circuit. That means as soon as they can determine their value they stop. So if (string == null) is true, the length part does not need to be evaluated, as the expression would always be true. Likewise with &&, where if the left side is false, the expression is always false and need not be evaluated further.

As an additional note, using length is generally a better idea than using .equals. The performance is slightly better (not much), and doesn't require object creation (though most compilers might optimize this out).

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This should work:

if (myString != null && !myString.equals(""))
    doSomething
}

If not, then myString likely has a value that you are not expecting. Try printing it out like this:

System.out.println("+" + myString + "+");

Using the '+' symbols to surround the string will show you if there is extra whitespace in there that you're not accounting for.

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I'd do something like this:

( myString != null && myString.length() > 0 )
    ? doSomething() : System.out.println("Non valid String");
  • Testing for null checks whether myString contains an instance of String.
  • length() returns the length and is equivalent to equals("").
  • Checking if myString is null first will avoid a NullPointerException.
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Every time i have to deal with strings (almost every time) I stop and wonder which way is really the fastest way to check for an empty string. Of course the string.Length == 0 check should be the fastest since Length is a property and there shouldn't be any processing other than retrieving the value of the property. But then I ask myself, why is there a String.Empty? It should be faster to check for String.Empty than for length, I tell myself. Well i finnaly decided to test it out. I coded a small Windows Console app that tells me how long it takes to do a certain check for 10 million repitions. I checked 3 different strings: a NULL string, an Empty string, and a "" string. I used 5 different methods: String.IsNullOrEmpty(), str == null, str == null || str == String.Empty, str == null || str == "", str == null || str.length == 0. Below are the results:

String.IsNullOrEmpty()
NULL = 62 milliseconds
Empty = 46 milliseconds
"" = 46 milliseconds

str == null
NULL = 31 milliseconds
Empty = 46 milliseconds
"" = 31 milliseconds

str == null || str == String.Empty
NULL = 46 milliseconds
Empty = 62 milliseconds
"" = 359 milliseconds

str == null || str == ""
NULL = 46 milliseconds
Empty = 343 milliseconds
"" = 78 milliseconds

str == null || str.length == 0
NULL = 31 milliseconds
Empty = 63 milliseconds
"" = 62 milliseconds

According to these results, on average checking for str == null is the fastest, but might not always yield what we're looking for. if str = String.Empty or str = "", it results in false. Then you have 2 that are tied in second place: String.IsNullOrEmpty() and str == null || str.length == 0. Since String.IsNullOrEmpty() looks nicer and is easier (and faster) to write I would recommend using it over the other solution.

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I had this problem in android and i use this way (Work for me):

String test = null;
if(test == "null"){
// Do work
}

But in java code I use :

String test = null;
if(test == null){
// Do work
}

And :

private Integer compareDateStrings(BeanToDoTask arg0, BeanToDoTask arg1, String strProperty) {
    String strDate0 = BeanUtils.getProperty(arg0, strProperty);_logger.debug("strDate0 = " + strDate0);
    String strDate1 = BeanUtils.getProperty(arg1, strProperty);_logger.debug("strDate1 = " + strDate1);
    return compareDateStrings(strDate0, strDate1);
}

private Integer compareDateStrings(String strDate0, String strDate1) {
    int cmp = 0;
    if (isEmpty(strDate0)) {
        if (isNotEmpty(strDate1)) {
            cmp = -1;
        } else {
            cmp = 0;
        }
    } else if (isEmpty(strDate1)) {
        cmp = 1;
    } else {
        cmp = strDate0.compareTo(strDate1);
    }
    return cmp;
}

private boolean isEmpty(String str) {
    return str == null || str.isEmpty();
}
private boolean isNotEmpty(String str) {
    return !isEmpty(str);
}
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