Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I have a random piece of code, I use for reading from CSV files... and it's fine... until after about 2000 reads... then the getline line fails with an access violation to 0xcccccc... which I assume means that the input stream (file) has been cleared... Not that I know why :)

int CCSVManager::ReadCSVLine ( fstream * fsInputFile,
                               vector <string> * recordData )
{
    string s;

    getline ( *fsInputFile, s );
    stringstream iss( s );

    for ( unsigned int i = 0; i < getNumFields (); i++ )
    {
        getline ( iss, s, ',' );
        (*recordData)[i] = s;
    }

    return 0;
}

Any ideas why?

share|improve this question
    
the size of your vector should be revised, is likely the cause of failure. –  lsalamon Apr 8 '10 at 18:51

7 Answers 7

std::vector does not reallocate itself to expand when you access it like an array like that. What you should be doing instead of

(*recordData)[i] = s;

is

recordData->push_back(s);

This will expand the vector as necessary. One important difference between the two methods is that the first one will always start writing from the first element of the vector. The second one will start appending to the end of the vector, which is different if the vector is not initially empty.

share|improve this answer
    
With a recordData->clear() as the first operation yes, otherwise the vector size will continue to grow –  Richard Harrison Apr 8 '10 at 19:03

Are you sure that recordData has enough space for holding all records? It should look like this:

for ( unsigned int i = 0; i < getNumFields() && i < recordData->size() && getline(iss, s, ','); i++ ) 
 { 
  (*recordData)[i] = s; 
 }
share|improve this answer

You may be corrupting memory if (*recordData).size() < getNumFields(). Consider eliminating getNumFields and relying on (*recordData).size() to store that information. Or, don't preset the size of the vector at all and use push_back.

Avoid the pointers, too, with references.

int CCSVManager::ReadCSVLine ( fstream &fsInputFile, vector <string> &recordData )
{
 string s;

 getline ( fsInputFile, s );
 istringstream iss( s );

 for ( unsigned int i = 0; i < getNumFields (); i++ )
 {
  getline ( iss, s, ',' );
  recordData.push_back( s );
 }

 return 0;
    }
share|improve this answer
    
+1 for references instead of pointers. (The +1 will take effect in 5 hours.) –  GManNickG Apr 8 '10 at 19:09
    
Was about 8 hours, but whatev. :) –  GManNickG Apr 9 '10 at 3:34

a call as follows before the for statement to ensure that the vector has enough elements.

recordData->resize(getNumFields ()); 
share|improve this answer
    
You mean resize. –  UncleBens Apr 8 '10 at 19:16
    
I did mean resize thanks for pointing it out. –  Richard Harrison Apr 8 '10 at 20:02

is getNumFields (); changing. That looks like its being recalculated everytime. Move that out side of loop

share|improve this answer

My guess would be that getNumFields() is returning a number greater than the number of lines in the file.

How many lines/records does the file contain?

What does getNumFields() return?

share|improve this answer

Argh... All very good answers but it was actually something far, far, far sillier. Thanks to your answers I started looking to some "other" parts of code and I realised what I had done wrong :) (It was actually the file being passed in that was blank. I didn't realise it was re-opening the file every time and overloading the file vector... such a stupid mistake :))

Thanks for your answers :) Still got me to my solution :)

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.