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I got tired of writing the following code:

/* Commenting out irrelevant parts
public string MiddleName;
public void Save(){
    SqlCommand = new SqlCommand();
    // blah blah...boring INSERT statement with params etc go here. */
    if(MiddleName==null){
        myCmd.Parameters.Add("@MiddleName", DBNull.Value);
    }
    else{
        myCmd.Parameters.Add("@MiddleName", MiddleName);
    }
    /*
    // more boring code to save to DB.
}*/

So, I wrote this:

public static object DBNullValueorStringIfNotNull(string value)
{
    object o;
    if (value == null)
    {
        o = DBNull.Value;
    }
    else
    {
        o = value;
    }
    return o;
}

// which would be called like:
myCmd.Parameters.Add("@MiddleName", DBNullValueorStringIfNotNull(MiddleName));

If this is a good way to go about doing this then what would you suggest as the method name? DBNullValueorStringIfNotNull is a bit verbose and confusing.

I'm also open to ways to alleviate this problem entirely. I'd LOVE to do this:

myCmd.Parameters.Add("@MiddleName", MiddleName==null ? DBNull.Value : MiddleName);

but that won't work because the "Operator '??' cannot be applied to operands of type 'string and 'System.DBNull'".

I've got C# 3.5 and SQL Server 2005 at my disposal if it matters.

share|improve this question
    
I wouldn't write the null instance at all - if the value is null, omit from the insert statement. – OMG Ponies Apr 8 '10 at 19:53
    
but that won't work. - please be specific, why people should guess? – Andrey Apr 8 '10 at 19:53
1  
@Andrey: His statement won't compile (the compiler will say there is no implicit conversion between DBNull and string). – Adam Robinson Apr 8 '10 at 19:54
    
@OMG: That's nice in theory, but it's pretty rare to find people who will write different insert statements depending upon whether or not particular parameters are null. It adds a lot of maintenance overhead with little or no practical benefit (other than being able to take advantage of column default values, of course). – Adam Robinson Apr 8 '10 at 19:55
1  
@OMG, how much faster could it possible be (seriously, I'm not familiar with how .net and SQL Server communicate)? With TCP I know most of the time would be spend in RTT for such small data packets. – David Murdoch Apr 8 '10 at 20:09
up vote 28 down vote accepted

Cast either of your values to object and it will compile.

myCmd.Parameters.Add("@MiddleName", MiddleName==null ? (object)DBNull.Value : MiddleName);
share|improve this answer
6  
Sweet: MiddleName ?? (object)DBNull.Value works! Or better yet public static readonly object DBNullValue = (object)DBNull.Value; with MiddleName ?? DBNullValue! You are my hero. – David Murdoch Apr 8 '10 at 19:58
    
Argh, i have to wait 3 more minutes before I can accept your answer. – David Murdoch Apr 8 '10 at 20:01
    
@David: Nice! Hadn't even considered coalescing. I'll have to start doing that in my code. I thought about caching the value as you describe, but wanted to keep the code to one line. – Adam Robinson Apr 8 '10 at 20:01
    
Can I edit your answer for add more info? – Kiquenet Nov 29 '13 at 18:30
    
@DavidMurdoch: Rather than MiddleName==null ? (object)DBNull.Value : MiddleName, you can also use MiddleName ?? SqlString.Null; (Documentation). This might not work on some databases. – Brian Jul 11 '14 at 20:17

Personally this is what I would do with an extension method (make sure this goes into a static class)

public static object GetStringOrDBNull(this string obj)
{
    return string.IsNullOrEmpty(obj) ? DBNull.Value : (object) obj
}

Then you'd have

myCmd.Parameters.Add("@MiddleName", MiddleName.GetStringOrDBNull());
share|improve this answer
    
I do like the name. So +1 for that. I like the accepted answer's solution better though. :-) – David Murdoch Apr 8 '10 at 20:11
3  
See if you change your mind after instead of having 100 if statements you have 100 ternary operators. – Chris Marisic Apr 8 '10 at 20:54
2  
I'm actually using a null coalescing operator. You have to agree that MiddleName ?? DBNullValue is pretty darn easy. But +1 for your comment too. – David Murdoch Apr 8 '10 at 21:00
    
+1 but I would prefer to use DBNull.Value only for actual null values and leave empty strings as is. I use return (object) obj ?? DBNull.Value; in my version of your extension method. – Justin May 7 '13 at 14:49
    
I have a lot of "such" parameters and extension method is the way to go in this case. Thanks! – Ankur-m Sep 10 '13 at 10:43

You can avoid the explicit cast to object using SqlString.Null instead of DBNull.Value:

MiddleName ?? SqlString.Null

There are corresponding types for int, datetime, and so forth. Here's a code snippet with a couple more examples:

 cmd.Parameters.AddWithValue("@StartDate", StartDate ?? SqlDateTime.Null);
 cmd.Parameters.AddWithValue("@EndDate", EndDate ?? SqlDateTime.Null);
 cmd.Parameters.AddWithValue("@Month", Month ?? SqlInt16.Null);
 cmd.Parameters.AddWithValue("@FormatID", FormatID ?? SqlInt32.Null);
 cmd.Parameters.AddWithValue("@Email", Email ?? SqlString.Null);
 cmd.Parameters.AddWithValue("@ZIP", ZIP ?? SqlBoolean.Null);
share|improve this answer
myCmd.Parameters.Add("@MiddleName", MiddleName ?? (object)DBNull.Value);
share|improve this answer

Yeap, we'd all love to do myCmd.Parameters.Add("@MiddleName", MiddleName ?? DBNull.Value);. Or better still, have the freakin' SqlClient layer understand that CLR null should be mapped to DBNull.Value when adding a parameter. Unfortunately the .Net type system closes the first alternative, and the implementation of SqlClient closes the second.

I'd go with a well known function name, like Coalesce or IsNull. Any DB developer will recognize what they do in an instant, from the name alone.

share|improve this answer
1  
There are good reasons that null doesn't map to DBNull.Value. Namely that it forces you to assign a value to every parameter, even if that "value" is a database null value. – Adam Robinson Apr 8 '10 at 19:57
    
Furthermore, having the ability to do string ?? DBNull.Value might be nice for this particular circumstance, you have to consider the issue from a compiler perspective: What is the return type of that expression? Should the compiler look for the most common ancestor, even if it's object? – Adam Robinson Apr 8 '10 at 20:00
    
Perhaps I wans't clear what I mean by 'the CLR type system': the impossibility to establish the compile time type of the expression (type1 ?? type2). We're saying the same thing. – Remus Rusanu Apr 8 '10 at 20:05
    
I love how you still have a Pony for your avatar. – David Murdoch Apr 8 '10 at 20:05
1  
@David: Yea, I grabbed it and made it persistent :) – Remus Rusanu Apr 8 '10 at 20:07

I'd rather give you two totally different suggestions:

  1. Use an ORM. There are plenty of non-intrusive ORM tools.

  2. Write your own wrapper for building commands, with a cleaner interface. Something like:

    public class MyCommandRunner {
      private SqlCommand cmd;
    
    
      public MyCommandRunner(string commandText) {
        cmd = new SqlCommand(commandText);
      }
    
    
      public void AddParameter(string name, string value) {
        if (value == null)
         cmd.Parameters.Add(name, DBNull.Value);
        else
          cmd.Parameters.Add(name, value);
      }
    
    
      // ... more AddParameter overloads
    }
    

If you rename your AddParameter methods to just Add, you can use it in a very slick way:

var cmd = new MyCommand("INSERT ...")
  {
    { "@Param1", null },
    { "@Param2", p2 }
  };
share|improve this answer
    
+1 for this idea. I may consider this in the future. – David Murdoch Apr 8 '10 at 20:12

I would suggest using nullable properties instead of public fields and an 'AddParameter' method (don't know if this code is optimized or correct, just off the top of my head):


private string m_MiddleName;

public string MiddleName
{
  get { return m_MiddleName; }
  set { m_MiddleName = value; }
}

.
.
.

public static void AddParameter(SQLCommand cmd, string parameterName, SQLDataType dataType, object value)
{
  SQLParameter param = cmd.Parameters.Add(parameterName, dataType);

  if (value is string) { // include other non-nullable datatypes
    if (value == null) {
      param.value = DBNull.Value;
    } else {
      param.value = value;
    }
  } else { 

    // nullable data types
    // UPDATE: HasValue is for nullable, not object type
    if (value.HasValue) // {{{=====================================================
    {
          param.value = value;
    } else 
    {
          param.value = DBNull.Value;
    }
  }
}

.
.
.
AddParameter(cmd, "@MiddleName", SqlDbType.VarChar, MiddleName);

share|improve this answer
    
value.HasValue not compiles: HasValue is for nullable<T>, not object type – Kiquenet Nov 28 '13 at 11:58

@David Thanks for your suggestion. The following method works great!

MiddleName ?? (object)DBNull.Value
share|improve this answer

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