Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Can anybody provide some details on <:< operator in scala. I think:

if(apple <:< fruit)  //checks if apple is a subclass of fruit.

Are there any other explanations? I see many definitions in the scala source file.

share|improve this question
1  
Are you referring to the method on Manifest or the class defined in Predef? –  Ben Lings Apr 8 '10 at 21:49
56  
That's known as the "Madonna wearing a button-down shirt" operator. –  Syntactic May 7 '10 at 14:34
3  
Ha, I'm calling it the "Angry Donkey" operator –  Adam Rabung May 7 '10 at 14:36
10  
If only there were a badge for my ridiculous, totally unhelpful comment being upvoted an obscene number of times... –  Syntactic May 7 '10 at 17:00
3  
show 4 more comments

7 Answers 7

up vote 18 down vote accepted

<:< is not an operator - it is an identifier and is therefore one of:

  • the name of a type (class, trait, type alias etc)
  • the name of a method/val or var

In this case, <:< appears twice in the library, once in Predef as a class and once as a method on Manifest.

For the method on Manifest, it checks whether the type represented by this manifest is a subtype of that represented by the manifest argument.

For the type in Predef, this is relatively new and I am also slightly confused about it because it seems to be part of a triumvirate of identical declarations!

class <%<[-From, +To] extends (From) ⇒ To
class <:<[-From, +To] extends (From) ⇒ To
class =:=[From, To] extends (From) ⇒ To
share|improve this answer
1  
The ones in Predef are generalised type constraints. This mailing list thread goes over some of it: old.nabble.com/… –  Ben Lings Apr 9 '10 at 11:08
1  
But from the declarations they all look identical, so how can they mean different things? –  oxbow_lakes Apr 9 '10 at 11:12
    
Thanks for the link: unfortunately I'm still struggling to understand how replacing implicit ev: A => B with implicit ev: A <:< B where <:<[A,B] extends A => B actually does anything –  oxbow_lakes Apr 9 '10 at 11:39
1  
I think you'll find that A => B and <:<[A, B] have the same variance annotations. I've realized what's going on now and it's in the implicit declarations conforms etc as you say –  oxbow_lakes Apr 9 '10 at 16:09
2  
@ben dead url replacement, Using generalised type constraints in 2.8 collections –  Shelby Moore III Dec 4 '11 at 14:59
show 1 more comment

The <:< type is defined in Predef.scala along with the related types =:= and <%< as follows:

// used, for example, in the encoding of generalized constraints
// we need a new type constructor `<:<` and evidence `conforms`, as 
// reusing `Function2` and `identity` leads to ambiguities (any2stringadd is inferred)
// to constrain any abstract type T that's in scope in a method's argument list (not just the method's own type parameters)
// simply add an implicit argument of type `T <:< U`, where U is the required upper bound (for lower-bounds, use: `U <: T`)
// in part contributed by Jason Zaugg
sealed abstract class <:<[-From, +To] extends (From => To)
implicit def conforms[A]: A <:< A = new (A <:< A) {def apply(x: A) = x} // not in the <:< companion object because it is also intended to subsume identity (which is no longer implicit)

This uses the Scala feature that a generic type op[T1, T2] can be written T1 op T2. This can be used, as noted by aioobe, to provide an evidence parameter for methods that only apply to some instances of a generic type (the example given is the toMap method that can only be used on a Traversable of Tuple2). As noted in the comment, this generalizes a normal generic type constraint to allow it to refer to any in-scope abstract type/type parameter. Using this (implicit ev : T1 <:< T2) has the advantage over simply using an evidence parameter like (implicit ev: T1 => T2) in that the latter can lead to unintended in-scope implicit values being used for the conversion.

I'm sure I'd seen some discussion on this on one of the Scala mailing lists, but can't find it at the moment.

share|improve this answer
    
What's the difference between <:< and =:= ? –  Eastsun May 7 '10 at 15:25
2  
@Eastsun <:< admits subclassing, while =:= doesn't. –  Daniel C. Sobral May 7 '10 at 15:29
3  
An implicit parameter ev: T1 <:< T2 asserts that T1 is a subtype of T2. An implicit parameter ev: T1 =:= T2 asserts that they are the same type. See article.gmane.org/gmane.comp.lang.scala.user/18879 for an example of the latter. –  Ben Lings May 7 '10 at 15:30
add comment

I asked around, and this is the explanation I got:

<:< is typically used as an evidence parameter. For example in TraversableOnce, toMap is declared as def toMap[T, U](implicit ev: A <:< (T, U)): immutable.Map[T, U]. This expresses the constraint that the toMap method only works if the traversable contains 2-tuples. flatten is another example. <:< is used to express the constraint that you can only flatten a traversable of traversables.

share|improve this answer
    
hmm, this seems somehow familiar :-) –  Seth Tisue May 8 '10 at 3:42
add comment

Actually, it checks if the class represented by the Manifest apple is a subclass of the class represented by the manifest fruit.

For instance:

manifest[java.util.List[String]] <:< manifest[java.util.ArrayList[String]] == false
manifest[java.util.ArrayList[String]] <:< manifest[java.util.List[String]] == true
share|improve this answer
add comment

Copy from scala.Predef.scala:

// Type Constraints --------------------------------------------------------------

  // used, for example, in the encoding of generalized constraints
  // we need a new type constructor `<:<` and evidence `conforms`, as 
  // reusing `Function2` and `identity` leads to ambiguities (any2stringadd is inferred)
  // to constrain any abstract type T that's in scope in a method's argument list (not just the method's own type parameters)
  // simply add an implicit argument of type `T <:< U`, where U is the required upper bound (for lower-bounds, use: `U <: T`)
  // in part contributed by Jason Zaugg
  sealed abstract class <:<[-From, +To] extends (From => To)
  implicit def conforms[A]: A <:< A = new (A <:< A) {def apply(x: A) = x}
share|improve this answer
add comment

To better understand the implementation.

sealed abstract class <:<[-From, +To] extends (From => To)
implicit def conforms[A]: A <:< A = new (A <:< A) {def apply(x: A) = x}

I tried to devise a simpler implementation. The following did not work.

sealed class <:<[-From <: To, +To]
implicit def conforms[A <: B, B]: A <:< B = new (A <:< B)

At least because it won't type check in all valid use cases.

case class L[+A]( elem: A )
{
   def contains[B](x: B)(implicit ev: A <:< B) = elem == x
}

error: type arguments [A,B] do not conform to class <:<'s
       type parameter bounds [-From <: To,+To]
def contains[B](x: B)(implicit ev: A <:< B) = elem == x
                                     ^
share|improve this answer
add comment

Hmm... I can't seem to find "<:<" anywhere as well, but "<:" denotes subtyping. From http://jim-mcbeath.blogspot.com/2008/09/scala-syntax-primer.html#types :

List[T] forSome { type T <: Component }

In the above example, we are saying T is some type which is a subtype of Component.

share|improve this answer
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.