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Why does this test program result in a java.lang.IllegalMonitorStateException?

public class test {
    static Integer foo = new Integer(1);
    public static void main(String[] args) {
        synchronized(foo) {
            foo++;
            foo.notifyAll();
        }
        System.err.println("Success");
    }
}

Result:

Exception in thread "main" java.lang.IllegalMonitorStateException
        at java.lang.Object.notifyAll(Native Method)
        at test.main(test.java:6)
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4 Answers 4

up vote 34 down vote accepted

You have noted correctly that notifyAll must be called from a synchronized block.

However, in your case, because of auto-boxing, the object you synchronized on is not the same instance that you invoked notifyAll on. In fact, the new, incremented foo instance is still confined to the stack, and no other threads could possibly be blocked on a wait call.

You could implement your own, mutable counter on which synchronization is performed. Depending on your application, you might also find that AtomicInteger meets your needs.

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I failed to realize that incrementing the Integer would allocate a new object instead of changing the value of the existing object. –  jjvainio Nov 3 '08 at 23:50
2  
This is one of the many gotcha's of Autoboxing/unboxing. –  James Schek Nov 4 '08 at 0:11
    
Trying to wait/notify using an Enum can also lead to this condition: synchronized (myEnum) { myEnum=MyEnum.NEW_VALUE; myEnum.notify(); } –  dmitrii Jun 17 '11 at 16:56
    
@erickson - always impressed with your sound answers and obvious knowledge –  mtraut May 9 '12 at 16:12
    
@mtraut Thanks! I appreciate the kind words. –  erickson May 9 '12 at 16:57

You should also be leery of locking or notifying on objects like String and Integer that can be interned by the JVM (to prevent creating a lot of objects that represent the integer 1 or the string "").

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As erickson has noted, the code without the postincrement operator works without error:

static Integer foo = new Integer(1);

public static void main(String[] args) {
    synchronized (foo) {
        foo.notifyAll();
    }
    System.out.println("Success");
}

output:

Success

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Incrementing the Integer makes the old foo disappear and be replaced with a brand new object foo which is not synchronized with the previous foo variable.

Here is an implementation of AtomicInteger that erickson suggested above. In this example foo.notifyAll(); does not produce a java.lang.IllegalMonitorStateException beause the AtomicInteger Object is not refreshed when foo.incrementAndGet(); is run.

import java.util.concurrent.atomic.AtomicInteger;

public class SynchronizeOnAPrimitive {
    static AtomicInteger foo = new AtomicInteger(1);
    public static void main(String[] args) {
        synchronized (foo) {
            foo.incrementAndGet();
            foo.notifyAll();
        }
        System.out.println("foo is: " + foo);
    }
}

Output:

foo is: 2
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