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In the following code, if Control (the element that trigers Toggle's first OL) is not Visible it should be set Visible and all other Controls (Controls[i]) so be Hidden.

.js

function Toggle(Control){
    var Controls=document.getElementsByTagName("ol",document.getElementById("Quote_App"));
    var Control=Control.getElementsByTagName("ol")[0];
    if(Control.style.visibility!="visible"){
        for(var i=0;i<Controls.length;i++){
            if(Controls[i]!=Control){

                Reveal("hide",20,0.3,Controls[i]);

            }else{

                Reveal("show",20,0.3,Control);

            };
        };
    }else{

        Reveal("hide",20,0.3,Control);

    };
};

Although the function [Toggle] works fine, it is actually setting Controls[i] to Hidden even if it is already.

This is easily rectified by adding an If statement as in the code below, surely there is a more elegant solution, maybe a complex If condition?

.js

function Toggle(Control){
    var Controls=document.getElementsByTagName("ol",document.getElementById("Quote_App"));
    var Control=Control.getElementsByTagName("ol")[0];
    if(Control.style.visibility!="visible"){
        for(var i=0;i<Controls.length;i++){
            if(Controls[i]!=Control){

if(Controls[i].style.visibility=="visible"){

                Reveal("hide",20,0.3,Controls[i]);

};

            }else{

                Reveal("show",20,0.3,Control);

            };
        };
    }else{

        Reveal("hide",20,0.3,Control);

    };
};

Your help is appreciated always.

share|improve this question
    
bug on line 3? Control.getElementsByTagName("ol")[0]; should be Controls.getElementsByTagName("ol")[0]; ? –  gregmac Apr 8 '10 at 21:11
    
There is no bug. Toggle's argument Control is the element that triggered the Toggle. The variable Control is the argument Control's first child OL (the options for the argument Control). –  Jonathon Oates Apr 8 '10 at 21:50

7 Answers 7

up vote 1 down vote accepted
if(Controls[i]!=Control && Controls[i].style.visibility=="visible") {
    Reveal("hide",20,0.3,Controls[i]);
}
share|improve this answer
    
Kudos, you're code is very clean. Unfortunately any solution seen here would require the element's style to be set either inline or by Javascript to work from the off as unless a style is specifically set .style.visibility would return Undefined. I need to look at getComputedStyle or specifically set elsewhere the element's visibility. –  Jonathon Oates Apr 8 '10 at 21:45
    
@Jay just checked .style.visibility == '' for the initial case seems to work on Chrome, Safari, and Firefox. haven't tested IE and I don't have access to it. –  Anurag Apr 10 '10 at 5:13

In the ugly pure javascript code world, your solution is fine. But only because you said "elegant", my answer is use jQuery.

I'll write it probably closer to what it really would be, using behaviour-based code rather than event-based, so this won't EXACTLY match your code.. but, it would look something like:

$('#Quote_app ol').click(function() { 
  if ($(this).is(':visible')) {
    $(this).fadeOut();
  } else {
    $(this).fadeIn();
    $('ol', $(this).parent()).not(this).fadeOut();
  }
});

That attaches a click event to every ol element underneath something with ID=Quote_app, and if it's currently visible, hides it, and otherwise, shows it, and hides all other ol elements.

share|improve this answer
1  
A library would be overkill for this application although I understand it's strengths for some. –  Jonathon Oates Apr 8 '10 at 21:12
    
Or any other framework that you like, since there are a lot of good ones. –  K. Norbert Apr 8 '10 at 21:13
2  
jQuery is perfect if you find the right function to use. It strips the mess and gives you (almost) easy to read code, so you flow with your logic/ideas better. –  Mike Apr 8 '10 at 21:14
    
Traffic overkill I'm talking. It is 20 kilobytes plus, whereas my entire app is only 2 kilobytes so far without miniforcation. This app is specifically for a Web hosting firm, so the Web site needs to load fast. A slow Web site would provoke a poor impression and not say much about their service (or servers). This is a discussion for a different place though. –  Jonathon Oates Apr 8 '10 at 21:37
1  
-1 cause "elegance" is subjective, and from experience, there's no such thing as the only and only real answer for it. –  Anurag Apr 9 '10 at 0:03

Not sure about what means what in your code. Stratagy is to do default action for all items first, and then do specifica action for selected item. Something like this:

for(var i=0;i<Controls.length;i++){
     if(Controls[i].style.visibility=="visible"){

         Reveal("hide",20,0.3,Controls[i]);

     };
}
Reveal("show",20,0.3,Control);
share|improve this answer
    
I think this is just individual style and more importantly, what you consider the default. More elements would be hidden than the single element to be shown, so to hide an element should (in my opinion) be the default. –  Jonathon Oates Apr 8 '10 at 21:26
if( Controls[i] != Control ) {
  if( Controls[i].style.visibility == "visible" ){
    Reveal( "hide", 20, 0.3, Controls[i] );
  };
} else {
  Reveal( "show", 20, 0.3, Control );
};

could be rewritten as:

if ( Controls[i] == Control ) {
  Reveal( "show", 20, 0.3, Control );
} else if ( Controls[i].style.visibility == "visible" ) {
  Reveal( "hide", 20, 0.3, Controls[i] );
}
share|improve this answer

To follow on from the jQuery suggestion -

jQuery often has a toggle function which beomes even more attractive in this situation as it reduces your code to a couple of lines. There currently isnt a toggleFade function but it can be easily added, to quote Karl Swedberg:

You can write a custom animation like this:

  jQuery.fn.fadeToggle = function(speed, easing, callback) { 
    return this.animate({opacity: 'toggle'}, speed, easing, callback); 
  }; 

Then, you can do this:

  $(".bio-toggler").click(function () { 
    $("#bio-form").fadeToggle();
  })

;

share|improve this answer

This will work without you having to use getComputedStyle, assuming your Reveal("hide", ...) function sets visibility to hidden.

if(Controls [i] !== Control && Controls[i].style.visibility !== "hidden") {
    Reveal("hide", 20, 0.3, Controls[i]);
}
share|improve this answer
    
Which it does, but Toggle is triggered by a Click event so Reveal would only Hide the Controls[i] if it was visible first. I have now set the script to Hide Controls[i] during initialisation. –  Jonathon Oates Apr 8 '10 at 22:46
    
Can you accept my answer as it answers the question in a way that works in all browsers (IE doesn't support getComputedStyle)? –  Eli Grey Apr 9 '10 at 19:12

With a little monkey-patching you could make this a lot cleaner without using any external framework. I have also taken the liberty to reshuffle the logic based on the assumption that the ordering of animations (if any) is unimportant.

if Control is hidden
    loop through Controls as C
        hide if C != Control
        show if C = Control
else
    hide Control

Another way to interpret this algorithm is - as long as Controls contains at least one element (doesn't matter which), the visibility of Control will be toggled. And all (Controls minus Control) will be hidden. So I'm again taking the liberty to assume that there will always be one control in Controls, and that Control will always be toggled.

Here's the monkey-patch++ code for it (also on jsfiddle). This eliminates all ifs and elses from the function.

The Toggle function now looks like this:

function Toggle(Control) {
    var Controls = document.getElementsByTagName("ol" ..
    var Control = Control.getElementsByTagName("ol")[0];

    Control.toggle();
    Controls.filter(function(c) { 
        return c != Control && c.isVisible();
    }).hide();
};

Here is the code-behind. NodeList and Array that apply a property on a list of elements:

​NodeList.prototype.forEach = function(f) {
    for(var i = 0; i <​ this.length; i++) {
        f.apply(null, [this[i]]);
    }
};
Array.prototype.forEach = NodeList.prototype.forEach;

NodeList.prototype.filter = function(f) {
    var results = [];
    for(var i = 0; i < this.length; i++) {
        if(f.apply(null, [this[i]])) {
            results.push(this[i]);
        }
    }
    return results;
};
Array.prototype.filter = NodeList.prototype.filter;  

NodeList.prototype.hide = function() {
    this.forEach(function(e) {
        e.hide();
    });
};
Array.prototype.hide = NodeList.prototype.hide;

NodeList.prototype.show = function() {
    this.forEach(function(e) {
        e.show();
    });
};
Array.prototype.show = NodeList.prototype.show;

These methods apply a property on an individual element:

Element.prototype.isVisible = function() {
    return this.style.visibility == 'visible' || this.style.visibility == '';
};

Element.prototype.show = function() {
    this.style.visibility = 'visible';
};

Element.prototype.hide = function() {
    this.style.visibility = 'hidden';
};

Element.prototype.toggle = function() {
    this.isVisible() ? this.hide() : this.show();
};
share|improve this answer

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