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I have few Question for which I am not able to get a proper answer .

1) Why should we call SuppressFinalize in the Dispose function when we don't have a destructor .

2) Dispose and finalize are used for freeing resources before the object is garbage collected. Whether it is managed or unmanaged resource we need to free it , then why we need a condition inside the dispose function , saying pass 'true' when we call this overridden function from IDisposable:Dispose and pass false when called from a finalize.

See the below code i copied from net.

class Test : IDisposable
   {
     private bool isDisposed = false;

     ~Test()
     {
       Dispose(false);
     }

     protected void Dispose(bool disposing)
     {
       if (disposing)
       {
         // Code to dispose the managed resources of the class
       }
       // Code to dispose the un-managed resources of the class

       isDisposed = true;
     }

     public void Dispose()
     {
       Dispose(true);
       GC.SuppressFinalize(this);
     }
   }

what if I remove the boolean protected Dispose function and implement the as below.

   class Test : IDisposable
   {
     private bool isDisposed = false;

     ~Test()
     {
       Dispose();
     }


     public void Dispose()
     {
      // Code to dispose the managed resources of the class
      // Code to dispose the un-managed resources of the class
      isDisposed = true;

      // Call this since we have a destructor . what if , if we don't have one 
       GC.SuppressFinalize(this);
     }
   }       
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4 Answers 4

up vote 9 down vote accepted

I'm going out on a limb here, but... most people don't need the full-blown dispose pattern. It's designed to be solid in the face of having direct access to unmanaged resources (usually via IntPtr) and in the face of inheritance. Most of the time, neither of these is actually required.

If you're just holding a reference to something else which implements IDisposable, you almost certainly don't need a finalizer - whatever holds the resource directly is responsible for dealing with that. You can make do with something like this:

public sealed class Foo : IDisposable
{
    private bool disposed;
    private FileStream stream;

    // Other code

    public void Dispose()
    {
        if (disposed)
        {
            return;
        }
        stream.Dispose();
        disposed = true;
    }
}

Note that this isn't thread-safe, but that probably won't be a problem.

By not having to worry about the possibility of subclasses holding resources directly, you don't need to suppress the finalizer (because there isn't one) - and you don't need to provide a way of subclasses customising the disposal either. Life is simpler without inheritance.

If you do need to allow uncontrolled inheritance (i.e. you're not willing to bet that subclasses will have very particular needs) then you need to go for the full pattern.

Note that with SafeHandle from .NET 2.0, it's even rarer that you need your own finalizer than it was in .NET 1.1.


To address your point about why there's a disposing flag in the first place: if you're running within a finalizer, other objects you refer to may already have been finalized. You should let them clean up themselves, and you should only clean up the resources you directly own.

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Hi Jon, just nitpicking, but the sentence "whatever holds the resource directly can deal with that", should probably be "will deal with that", (ie. "can" --> "will") to emphasize the point that it's not the outer class' job to handle it at all. –  Lasse V. Karlsen Apr 9 '10 at 10:21
    
@Lasse: Nitpick away :) Will edit. –  Jon Skeet Apr 9 '10 at 10:32
    
One more Question, Since System.Object is the base of all the objects ,which by default has a finalize method implemented , even though we have not provided a destructor , wont GC put this in the finalize queue ? or why do we say that if we dont provide a destrutor object wont be put in the finalize queue ? Because by virtue of inheritance protected members are like private members of derived class . –  somaraj Apr 9 '10 at 10:58
    
Is there any legitimate reason for a subclass derived from a non-trivial parent class to have a cleanup finalizer if the parent does not? I can't think of any case where it would not be better for the derived class to encapsulate any unmanaged resources into their own class, with its own finalizer completely detached from the main one. Actually, even if all one wants is an "alarm bell" finalizer, it may be better to encapsulate that into its own class, rather than adding a finalizer to the derived class. –  supercat Apr 12 '12 at 15:01
1  
I'd go further than "most people don't need the full-blown dispose pattern": Nobody needs it, because having both managed and unmanaged resources that need clean-up held directly as fields is an anti-pattern, and while the "dispose pattern" is a smart way of dealing with a case where one has that, that just makes it a smart way of dealing with the fact that you've done something dumb. The only time anyone should use it is when its forced upon them by inheriting from something that does. –  Jon Hanna Mar 12 at 16:59

Keep the first version, it is safer and is the correct implementation of the dispose pattern.

  1. Calling SuppressFinalize tells the GC that you have done all the destruction/disposing yourself (of resources held by your class) and that it does not need to call the destructor.

  2. You need the test in case the code using your class has already called dispose and you shouldn't tell the GC to dispose again.

See this MSDN document (Dispose methods should call SuppressFinalize).

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Yes I do understand the that SupressFinalze will prevent the GC from calling Finalize . But my doubt is when I am not having a destuctor why we need to call SupressFinalze . Because Finalize will be ony called for those objets in the finalzer queue and my object dont have destructor so any way GC is not going to call . 2) My second pint is , why dispose pattens insist about an overloaded dispose funtion which takes a boolean . which will control the release of managed or unmanaged resources . when the object is going to be disposed , why we need to treat resource seperatly , lets free all. –  somaraj Apr 9 '10 at 6:36
    
That rule is only relevant when you need a finalizer or you need to allow subclasses to have a finalizer. In many situations this isn't the case. –  Jon Skeet Apr 9 '10 at 6:36
2  
@somaraj: The point is that your class may not have a finalizer, but a subclass might. –  Jon Skeet Apr 9 '10 at 6:37
    
@JonSkeet: Why would you want to supress a subclass' finalizer? base.Dispose() is called from the subclass Dispose() so there should already be a GC.SupressFinalize there. –  adrianm Apr 9 '10 at 11:07
    
@adrianm: You would want to suppress finalization if you've been disposed, on the reasonable assumption that all the clean-up required will have taken place. GC.SuppressFinalize() is normally in the parameterless Dispose method, rather than the one with the "disposing" parameter which is virtual - in the standard (long) pattern. –  Jon Skeet Apr 9 '10 at 13:08

Here are the main facts

1) Object.Finalize is what your class overrides when it has a Finalizer. the ~TypeName() destructor method is just shorthand for 'override Finalize()' etc

2) You call GC.SuppressFinalize if you are disposing of resources in your Dispose method before finalization (i.e. when coming out of a using block etc). If you do not have a Finalizer, then you do not need to do this. If you have a Finalizer, this ensures that the object is taken off of the Finalization queue (so we dont dispose of stuff twice as the Finalizer usually calls the Dispose method as well)

3) You implement a Finalizer as a 'fail safe' mechanism. Finalizers are guaranteed to run (as long as the CLR isnt aborted), so they allow you to make sure code gets cleaned up in the event that the Dispose method was not called (maybe the programmer forgot to create the instance within a 'using' block etc.

4) Finalizers are expensive as Types that have finalizers cant be garbage collected in a Generation-0 collection (the most efficient), and are promoted to Generation-1 with a reference to them on the F-Reachable queue, so that they represent a GC root. it's not until the GC performs a Generation-1 collection that the finalizer gets called, and the resources are released - so implement finalizers only when very important - and make sure that objects that require Finalization are as small as possible - because all objects that can be reached by your finalizable object will be promoted to Generation-1 also.

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1. Answer for the first question

Basically, you don't have to call SuppressFinalize method if your class doesn't have a finalize method (Destructor). I believe people call SupressFinalize even when there is no finalize method because of lack of knowledge.

2. Answer for the second question

Purpose of the Finalize method is to free un-managed resources. The most important thing to understand is that, Finalize method is called when the object is in the finalization queue. Garbage collector collects all the objects that can be destroy. Garbage Collector adds objects those have got finalization to the finalization queue before destroy. There is another .net background process to call the finalize method for the objects those are in the finalization queue. By the time that background process execute the finalize method, that particular object's other managed reference may have been destroyed. Because there is no specific order when it comes to the finalization execution. So, the Dispose Pattern wants to make sure that finalize method do not try to access managed objects. That's why managed objects are going in side "if (disposing)" clause which is unreachable for the finalize method.

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