Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.


In Hibernate when i save() an object in a transaction, and then i rollback it, the saved object still remains in the DB. It's strange because this issue doesn't happen with the update() or delete() method, just with save().

Here is the code i'm using:

DbEntity dbEntity = getDbEntity();
HibernateUtil.beginTransaction();
Session session = HibernateUtil.getCurrentSession();
session.save(dbEntity);
HibernateUtil.rollbackTransaction();

And here is the HibernateUtil class (just the involved functions, i guarantee the getSessionFactory() method works well - there is an Interceptor handler, but it doesn't matter now):

private static final ThreadLocal<Session> threadSession = new ThreadLocal<Session>();
private static final ThreadLocal<Transaction> threadTransaction = new ThreadLocal<Transaction>();

/**
* Retrieves the current Session local to the thread.
* <p/>
* If no Session is open, opens a new Session for the running thread.
*
* @return Session
*/
public static Session getCurrentSession()
    throws HibernateException {
    Session s = (Session) threadSession.get();
    try {
        if (s == null) {
            log.debug("Opening new Session for this thread.");
            if (getInterceptor() != null) {
                log.debug("Using interceptor: " + getInterceptor().getClass());
                s = getSessionFactory().openSession(getInterceptor());
            } else {
                s = getSessionFactory().openSession();
            }
            threadSession.set(s);
        }
    } catch (HibernateException ex) {
        throw new HibernateException(ex);
    }
    return s;
}

/**
* Start a new database transaction.
*/
public static void beginTransaction()
    throws HibernateException {
    Transaction tx = (Transaction) threadTransaction.get();
    try {
        if (tx == null) {
            log.debug("Starting new database transaction in this thread.");
            tx = getCurrentSession().beginTransaction();
            threadTransaction.set(tx);
        }
    } catch (HibernateException ex) {
        throw new HibernateException(ex);
    }
}

/**
 * Rollback the database transaction.
 */
public static void rollbackTransaction()
    throws HibernateException {
    Transaction tx = (Transaction) threadTransaction.get();
    try {
        threadTransaction.set(null);
        if ( tx != null && !tx.wasCommitted() && !tx.wasRolledBack() ) {
            log.debug("Tyring to rollback database transaction of this thread.");
            tx.rollback();
        }
    } catch (HibernateException ex) {
        throw new HibernateException(ex);
    } finally {
        closeSession();
    }
}

Thanks

share|improve this question
    
is autocommit set to false on the jdbc connection? –  Maurice Perry Apr 9 '10 at 13:54
    
Yes it is (<property name="hibernate.connection.autocommit">false</property>). The flush mode of the session is on COMMIT mode. –  Mark Apr 9 '10 at 19:58
add comment

2 Answers 2

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Check if your database supports a roll back i.e. if you're using InnoDB tables and not MyISAM (you can mix transactional and non-transactional tables but in most cases, you want all your tables to be InnoDB).

share|improve this answer
    
I've tried your way, but the result is always the same –  Mark Apr 11 '10 at 0:29
    
@Marcos Ok. Thanks for the feedback. I didn't spot you were using MySQL, I've updated my answer accordingly. –  Pascal Thivent Apr 11 '10 at 1:07
    
thanks man, now it works as expected –  Mark Apr 12 '10 at 1:19
add comment

MySQL by default uses the MyIsam storage engine. As the MyISAM does not support transactions, insert, update and delete statements are directly written to the database. The commit and rollback statements are ignored.

In order to use transaction you need to change the storage engine of you tables. Use this command:

ALTER TABLE table_name ENGINE = InnoDB;

(note how ever, that the two storage engines are different and you need to test you're application if it still behaves as expected)

share|improve this answer
    
For a while now, the default engine of MySQL is InnoDB. –  Rafael Barros Mar 13 at 14:50
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.