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I've inherited a load of Junit test, but these tests (apart from most not working) are a mixture of actual unit test and integration tests (requiring external systems, db etc).

So I'm trying to think of a way to actually separate them out, so that I can run the unit test nice and quickly and the integration tests after that.

The options are..

  1. Split them into separate directories.

  2. Move to Junit4 (from v3) and annotate the classes to separate them.

  3. Use a file naming convention to tell what a class is , i.e. AdapterATest and AdapterAIntergrationTest.

3 has the issue that Eclipse has the option to "Run all tests in the selected project/package or folder". So it would make it very hard to just run the integration tests.

2: runs the risk that developers might start writing integration tests in unit test classes and it just gets messy.

1: Seems like the neatest solution, but my gut says there must be a better solution out there.

So that is my question, how do you lot break apart integration tests and proper unit tests?

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I would just like to thank you all for you input, I know this is a subjective question, and doesn't one correct answer. But you have helped me realise that there isn't any other options than the ones I've listed. I think I'm going to go with the directory stucture for the moment and move to JUnit4, although not use annotations for splitting them up just yet. –  jeff porter Apr 12 '10 at 7:16

5 Answers 5

up vote 6 down vote accepted

I currently use separate directories due to organisational policy (and Junit 3 legacy) but I'm looking to transition to annotations myself now I'm on Junit 4.

I wouldn't be overly concerned about developers putting integration tests in your unit test classes - add a rule in your coding standards if necessary.

I'm interested to know what sort of other solutions there might be apart from annotations or physically separating the classes..

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You can split them very easily using JUnit categories and Maven.
This is shown very, very briefly below by splitting unit and integration tests.

Define A Marker Interface

The first step in grouping a test using categories is to create a marker interface.
This interface will be used to mark all of the tests that you want to be run as integration tests.

public interface IntegrationTest {}

Mark your test classes

Add the category annotation to the top of your test class. It takes the name of your new interface.

import org.junit.experimental.categories.Category;
@Category(IntegrationTest.class)
public class ExampleIntegrationTest{
  @Test
  public void longRunningServiceTest() throws Exception {
  }
}

Configure Maven Unit Tests

The beauty of this solution is that nothing really changes for the unit test side of things.
We simply add some configuration to the maven surefire plugin to make it to ignore any integration tests.

<plugin>
  <groupId>org.apache.maven.plugins</groupId>
  <artifactId>maven-surefire-plugin</artifactId>
  <version>2.11</version>
  <dependencies>
   <dependency>
     <groupId>org.apache.maven.surefire</groupId>
     <artifactId>surefire-junit47</artifactId>
     <version>2.12</version>
   </dependency>
  </dependencies>
  <configuration>
    <includes>
      <include>**/*.class</include>
    </includes>
    <excludedGroups>com.test.annotation.type.IntegrationTest</excludedGroups>
  </configuration>
</plugin>

When you do a mvn clean test only your unmarked unit tests will run.

Configure Maven Integration Tests

Again the configuration for this is very simple.
We use the standard failsafe plugin and configure it to only run the integration tests.

<plugin>
  <groupId>org.apache.maven.plugins</groupId>
  <artifactId>maven-surefire-plugin</artifactId>
  <version>2.11</version>
  <dependencies>
    <dependency>
      <groupId>org.apache.maven.surefire</groupId>
      <artifactId>surefire-junit47</artifactId>
      <version>2.12</version>
    </dependency>
  </dependencies>
  <configuration>
    <includes>
      <include>**/*.class</include>
    </includes>
    <excludedGroups>com.test.annotation.type.IntegrationTest</excludedGroups>
  </configuration>
</plugin>

The configuration uses a standard execution goal to run the failsafe plugin during the integration-test phase of the build.

You can now do a mvn clean install
This time as well as the unit tests running, the integration tests are run during the integration-test phase.

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Thanks for doing that! –  Will May 3 '12 at 14:15
17  
I think there's an error in your last pom.xml fragment. you pasted the same snippet as for "test" phase. it still excludes the integration tests and also is not bound to any maven phase. –  Alex May 30 '12 at 1:34
    
Indeed, the last pom fragment is a copy&paste mistake. It should show the maven-failsafe-plugin. –  Paulo Merson Sep 10 '13 at 19:03
2  
So what should be the second xml then? :O –  Liv Oct 31 '13 at 6:21
1  
ill upvote as soon as the second pom is fixed –  Alden Jan 30 at 19:00

We use Maven Surefire Plugin to run unit tests and Maven Failsafe Plugin to run integration tests. Unit tests follow the **/Test*.java **/*Test.java **/*TestCase.java naming conventions, integration tests - **/IT*.java **/*IT.java **/*ITCase.java. So it's actually your option number three.

In a couple of projects we use TestNG and define different test groups for integration/unit tests, but this is probably not suitable for you.

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+1 for the maven + surefire + failsafe + junit combo. I didn't realize failsafe would run "IT*" automagically. Sweet. –  PapaFreud Nov 17 '11 at 13:43

I would move up to Junit4 just for having it :)

You could separate them into different test suites. I don't know how they are organised in Junit3 but it should be easy in Junit4 just to build up test suites and put all the real unit tests in one of them and then use a second suite for the integration tests.

Now define a run configuration for both suites in eclipse and you can easily run a single suite. These suites also could be launched from an automated process allowing you to run the unit tests every time the source changes and maybe the integration tests (if they are really large) only once a day or once an hour.

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There's not one right answer. As you've explained, there are several ways to do it which will work. I've done both the file naming scheme and splitting things into different directories.

It sounds like splitting thing up into different directories might work better for you, and that seems a little clearer to me, so I'd lean towards that.

I don't think I would try annotations because that seems more fine-grained to me. Do you really want these two types of tests mixed together in the same file? I wouldn't.

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