Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I would like to declare some integer constants in Powershell.

Is there any good way to do that?

share|improve this question

4 Answers 4

up vote 34 down vote accepted

Use

Set-Variable test -option Constant -value 100

or

Set-Variable test -option ReadOnly -value 100

The difference between "Constant" and "ReadOnly" is that a read-only variable can be removed (and then re-created) via

Remove-Variable test -Force

whereas a constant variable can't be removed (even with -Force).

See this TechNet article for more details.

share|improve this answer
1  
Hmm, but how do you force the datatype when using Set-Variable? When dealing with variables one may use [string]$name = value but that seems not to be possible for constants? –  masi Dec 1 '12 at 23:32
    
@masi just force the value Set-Variable test -option Constant -value [string]100 –  Monso Apr 26 at 23:41

Use -option Constant with the Set-Variable cmdlet:

Set-Variable myvar -option Constant -value 100

Now $myvar has a constant value of 100 and cannot be modified.

share|improve this answer
    
Wow, that's clunky. You have to use Set-Variable to do it, huh? –  Tom Hazel Apr 9 '10 at 14:26
    
Yes, there's not unclunky way to do it :) –  Paolo Tedesco Apr 9 '10 at 14:26
1  
you can also modify and existing variable with either set-variable (aliased to sv) or by using get-variable (gv) and tinkering with its Options property. –  x0n Apr 9 '10 at 16:05
    
Hmm, but how do you force the datatype when using Set-Variable? When dealing with variables one may use [string]$name = value but that seems not to be possible for constants? –  masi Dec 2 '12 at 9:05

Here is a solution for defining a constant like this:

const myConst = 42

Solution taken from http://poshcode.org/4063

    function Set-Constant {
  <#
    .SYNOPSIS
        Creates constants.
    .DESCRIPTION
        This function can help you to create constants so easy as it possible.
        It works as keyword 'const' as such as in C#.
    .EXAMPLE
        PS C:\> Set-Constant a = 10
        PS C:\> $a += 13

        There is a integer constant declaration, so the second line return
        error.
    .EXAMPLE
        PS C:\> const str = "this is a constant string"

        You also can use word 'const' for constant declaration. There is a
        string constant named '$str' in this example.
    .LINK
        Set-Variable
        About_Functions_Advanced_Parameters
  #>
  [CmdletBinding()]
  param(
    [Parameter(Mandatory=$true, Position=0)]
    [string][ValidateNotNullOrEmpty()]$Name,

    [Parameter(Mandatory=$true, Position=1)]
    [char][ValidateSet("=")]$Link,

    [Parameter(Mandatory=$true, Position=2)]
    [object][ValidateNotNullOrEmpty()]$Mean,

    [Parameter(Mandatory=$false)]
    [string]$Surround = "script"
  )

  Set-Variable -n $name -val $mean -opt Constant -s $surround
}

Set-Alias const Set-Constant
share|improve this answer

To use a specific type of value, say Int64, you can explicitly cast the value used in set-variable.

For instance:

set-variable -name test -value ([int64]100) -option Constant

To check,

$test | gm

And you'll see that it is an Int64 (rather than Int32, which would be normal for the value 100).

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.