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I have a DIV container with several inner DIVs layed out by floating them all left. The inner DIVs may change width on certain events, and the containing DIV adjusts accordingly. I use float:left in the container to keep it shrunk to the width of the inner divs. I use float:left in the inner divs so the layout is clean even when their contents change.

The catch is that I want the DIV container width and height to remain constant, UNLESS a particular event causes a change to the inner widths. Conceptually I want to use float on the inners for the layout benefit, but then I want to "fix" them so they don't float around. So if the container is 700px wide, I want it to remain so even if the user narrows the browser window. I'd like the container, and it's internal DIVs to just be clipped by the browser window.

I sense this can all be done nicely in CSS, I just can't quite figure out how. I'm not averse to adding another container if necessary...

Since the only desired layout changes are event-based, I am also willing to use a bit of JS. But is this necessary? (And I'm still not sure I know what to modify: container dimensions? inner floatiness? other?)

<!DOCTYPE html PUBLIC "-//W3C//DTD XHTML 1.0 Transitional//EN"
  "http://www.w3.org/TR/xhtml1/DTD/xhtml1-transitional.dtd">
<html>
<head>
<style type="text/css">

#canvas {
  overflow:auto;   /* for clearing floats */
}

#container {
  float:left;   /* so container shrinks around contained divs */
  border:thin solid blue;
}

.inner {
  float:left;   /* so inner elems line up nicely w/o saying fixed coords */
  padding-top:8px;
  padding-bottom:4px;
  padding-left:80px;
  padding-right:80px;
}

#inner1 {
  background-color:#ffdddd;
}

#inner2 {
  background-color:#ddffdd;
}

#inner3 {
  background-color:#ddddff;
}

</style>
</head>
<body>
<div id="canvas">
<div id="container">
<div id="inner1" class="inner">
inner 1
</div>
<div id="inner2" class="inner">
inner 2
</div>
<div id="inner3" class="inner">
inner 3
</div>
</div>
</div>
cleared element
</body>
</html>
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up vote 7 down vote accepted

If I understand you correctly, what you could do is to get rid of the floats, and lay out using display:inline-block. That way, as long as you ensure there are no spaces or newlines between the inner-divs it will be treated as a single word by the layout engine, and will stay on a single line (thus enlarging the containing <div> and/or overflowing if needed. You can use min-width and text-align:center for some stylistic improvements. Spacing between the elements can be created by using margin attributes on the inner <div>s.

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1  
This works beautifully. Exactly what I needed. Thank you! – joe Apr 10 '10 at 6:33

As long as you set the container's width to 700px or whatever number in the css, the elements shouldn't float around. Also keep in mind that display: inline-block isn't supported by IE 7 and below.

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For future reference, here's the code, modified to use Paul's solution. It's simpler in that it doesn't use floats. Just beware the white space between divs. This isn't a problem in my real-world situation because the divs are generated using javascript/DOM.

I posted this as an answer, not a comment, to get the code formatting.

<!DOCTYPE html PUBLIC "-//W3C//DTD XHTML 1.0 Transitional//EN"
  "http://www.w3.org/TR/xhtml1/DTD/xhtml1-transitional.dtd">
<html>
<head>
<style type="text/css">

#container {
  display:inline-block;
  overflow:hidden;
  white-space:nowrap;
  border:thin solid blue;
}

.inner {
  display:inline-block;
  padding-top:8px;
  padding-bottom:4px;
  padding-left:180px;
  padding-right:80px;
}

#inner1 {
  background-color:#ffdddd;
}

#inner2 {
  background-color:#ddffdd;
}

#inner3 {
  background-color:#ddddff;
}

</style>
</head>
<body>
<div id="container">
<div id="inner1" class="inner">
inner 1
</div><div id="inner2" class="inner">
inner 2
</div><div id="inner3" class="inner">
inner 3
</div>
</div>
</body>
</html>
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