Stack Overflow is a community of 4.7 million programmers, just like you, helping each other.

Join them; it only takes a minute:

Sign up
Join the Stack Overflow community to:
  1. Ask programming questions
  2. Answer and help your peers
  3. Get recognized for your expertise

I have this code to register dlls into my gac

 Assembly asm = Assembly.LoadFrom(argument);
    RegistrationServices regAsm = new RegistrationServices();
    bool bResult = regAsm.RegisterAssembly(asm, AssemblyRegistrationFlags.SetCodeBase);

and that works fine, i'm getting true to bResult, but when i open the GAC window i expected to see the dll there, but it is not. Can anyone explain me why?

When i drop the dll into the GAC window i see it there.

share|improve this question
up vote 1 down vote accepted

Your code doesn't register the assembly in GAC, but, as explained here,

Registers the classes in a managed assembly to enable creation from COM.

which is not the same.

share|improve this answer
    
so the right way to register is with regasm.exe? because i also tried that but still didn't see it in the GAC window. – UshaP Apr 9 '10 at 22:02
2  
The right way is gacutil, not regasm (which is for registering .NET assemblies for COM creation). – Fabrizio C. Apr 9 '10 at 22:07

It is rather strange that this isn't wrapped by the .NET framework. The necessary fusion declarations are readily available. This code worked well:

using System;
using System.Runtime.InteropServices;
using System.Runtime.InteropServices.ComTypes;

static class GacUtil {

    public static void InstallAssembly(string path, bool forceRefresh) {
        IAssemblyCache iac = null;
        CreateAssemblyCache(out iac, 0);
        try {
            uint flags = forceRefresh ? 2u : 1u;
            int hr = iac.InstallAssembly(flags, path, IntPtr.Zero);
            if (hr < 0) Marshal.ThrowExceptionForHR(hr);
        }
        finally {
            Marshal.FinalReleaseComObject(iac);
        }
    }

    public static void UninstallAssembly(string displayName) {
        IAssemblyCache iac = null;
        CreateAssemblyCache(out iac, 0);
        try {
            uint whatHappened;
            int hr = iac.UninstallAssembly(0, displayName, IntPtr.Zero, out whatHappened);
            if (hr < 0) Marshal.ThrowExceptionForHR(hr);
            switch (whatHappened) {
                case 2: throw new InvalidOperationException("Assembly still in use");
                case 5: throw new InvalidOperationException("Assembly still has install references");
                case 6: throw new System.IO.FileNotFoundException();    // Not actually raised
            }
        }
        finally {
            Marshal.FinalReleaseComObject(iac);
        }
    }


    [ComImport, InterfaceType(ComInterfaceType.InterfaceIsIUnknown), Guid("e707dcde-d1cd-11d2-bab9-00c04f8eceae")]
    internal interface IAssemblyCache {
        [PreserveSig]
        int UninstallAssembly(uint fags, [MarshalAs(UnmanagedType.LPWStr)] string assemblyName, IntPtr pvReserved, out uint pulDisposition);
        [PreserveSig]
        int QueryAssemblyInfo(uint dwFlags, [MarshalAs(UnmanagedType.LPWStr)] string pszAssemblyName, IntPtr pAsmInfo);
        [PreserveSig]
        int CreateAssemblyCacheItem(/* arguments omitted */);
        [PreserveSig]
        int CreateAssemblyScavenger(out object ppAsmScavenger);
        [PreserveSig]
        int InstallAssembly(uint dwFlags, [MarshalAs(UnmanagedType.LPWStr)] string pszManifestFilePath, IntPtr pvReserved);
    }

    [DllImport("mscorwks.dll", PreserveSig = false)]  // NOTE: use "clr.dll" in .NET 4+
    internal static extern void CreateAssemblyCache(out IAssemblyCache ppAsmCache, int reserved);
} 

Don't forget to press F5 in the Explorer window to refresh the view if you are adding and removing assemblies with this code.

share|improve this answer
    
I think this is already wrapped in System.EnterpriseServices.dll just call new System.EnterpriseServices.Internal.Publish().GacInstall(assemblyPath); or new System.EnterpriseServices.Internal.Publish().GacRemove(assemblyPath) – Scott Lerch Oct 18 '13 at 21:52
1  
@ScottLerch Unfortunately, it wraps it too well -- there's no way of knowing the result of whether an uninstall succeeded or not. In GacRemove(), the result of UninstallAssembly() is discarded; you get an event log, but the exception never bubbles up to the calling code. – Lynn Crumbling Nov 19 '13 at 19:12

The method you are using is intended for COM registration. There is no official way of doing this.

Microsoft has a knowledgebase about how to use the undocumented GAC API

hope this helps,

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.