Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Most subversion tools create a default repository layout with /trunk, /branches and /tags. The documentation also recommends not using separate repositories for each project, so that code can be more easily shared.

Following that advice has led to me having a repository with the following layout:

/trunk
      /Project1
      /Project2
/branches
         /Project1
         /Project2
/tags
     /Project1
     /Project2

and so on, you get the idea. Over time, I've found this structure a bit clumsy and it occurred to me that there's an alternative interpretation of the recommendations, such as:

/Project1
         /trunk
         /branches
         /tags
/Project2
         /trunk
         /branches
         /tags       

So, which layout do people use, and why? Or - is there another way to do things that I've completely missed?

share|improve this question
    
How does using the same repository for multiple projects help you share code? –  Tomislav Nakic-Alfirevic Apr 9 '10 at 22:13
    
You tell me ;-) That's what it says in the Subversion manual. –  Tim Long Apr 11 '10 at 16:04
add comment

5 Answers

I find that the Subversion Repository Layout blog post summarizes this pretty well:

(...) there are several common layouts that have been adopted by the community as best practices and therefore one could think of these as recommendations. If your repository is accessible to the public, following these conventions might make it easier for users that have accessed other Subversion repositories to find what they are looking for.

There are two commonly used layouts:

trunk
branches
tags

This first layout is the best option for a repository that contains a single project or a set of projects that are tightly related to each other. This layout is useful because it is simple to branch or tag the entire project or a set of projects with a single command:

svn copy url://repos/trunk url://repos/tags/tagname -m "Create tagname"

This is probably the most commonly used repository layout and is used by many open source projects, like Subversion itself and Subclipse. This is the layout that most hosting sites like Tigris.org, SourceForge.net and Google Code follow as each project at these sites is given its own repository.

The next layout is the best option for a repository that contains unrelated or loosely related projects.

ProjectA
   trunk
   branches
   tags
ProjectB
   trunk
   branches
   tags

In this layout, each project receives a top-level folder and then the trunk/branches/tags folders are created beneath it. This is really the same layout as the first layout, it is just that instead of putting each project in its own repository, they are all in a single repository. The Apache Software Foundation uses this layout for their repository which contains all of their projects in one single repository.

With this layout, each project has its own branches and tags and it is easy to create them for the files in that project using one command, similar to the one previously shown:

svn copy url://repos/ProjectA/trunk url://repos/ProjectA/tags/tagname -m "Create tagname"

What you cannot easily do in this layout is create a branch or tag that contains files from both ProjectA and ProjectB. You can still do it, but it requires multiple commands and you also have to decide if you are going to make a special folder for the branches and tags that involve multiple projects. If you are going to need to do this a lot, you might want to consider the first layout.

So, to paraphrase:

  • Use the first layout for a single or multiple related projects.
  • Use the second layout for non related projects.

The whole post is worth the read.

share|improve this answer
add comment

The second layout is the way to go. One good reason is to allow or deny a developer to work with one of the projects.

share|improve this answer
add comment

I prefer the second. With the second, if people's permissions are different between the two projects, it's easier to implement.

share|improve this answer
1  
Similarly, it's easier to use svn dump to split them out to separate repositories if politics or business require it. –  retracile Apr 10 '10 at 1:21
add comment

I greatly prefer the second, using maven or ant/ivy to ingest the artifacts from other projects if needed.

I also prefer to have a single project per repository, or a small number of related repositories.

It simplifies access control, which is easier at the repository level than the path level within the repository - particularly when authenticating against LDAP.

Backup/restore operations are a little more complicated initially as you have to loop through all the repositories to do a hot copy, but in the unlucky event you have to restore only one repo - the others needn't be taken offline or loose any data. As projects die, the repositories can simply be deleted thus saving you space on future backups.

Hook scripts become simpler when there is only one project (or a small number of related projects) per repository, you don't have to examine the affected path to conditionally take action in your hook.

As retracile noted, one monolithic repository is likely going to be a huge pain if you ever want to selectively export using svndumpfilter - the number of changed paths causing it to die is likely to be high.

Upgrading the repository schema for future versions of svn requires more effort - you have to do it n times rather than once... but it can be scripted and you needn't coordinate everyone at once.

If someone commits a password, and you have to obliterate it, you can do the dump/filter/reload quickly in one repo while not affecting other teams.

One piece of advice if you go this route - have a different .conf file per repo rather than one huge one, again it's easier to manage as well as providing comfort that some timestamps are going to be old - if something's amiss you can look for recent changes easier.

share|improve this answer
add comment
up vote -1 down vote accepted

I decided to bite the bullet and restructure my repository. I wrote a small program to assist (below). The steps I followed were:

  1. Make a backup copy of the original repository.
  2. svn checkout the entire repository. This took a long time and a lot of disk space.
  3. Run the program from below on the working copy from the previous step.
  4. Examine the modified working copy and tidy up any left over issues (eg. svn delete the obsolete trunk, tags and branches folders)
  5. svn commit back to the repository.

This whole process took time, but I decided to take this approach because modifying a working copy is a lot safer than hacking up a live repository and I had the options to simply throw away the working copy if it all went wrong, to fix any issue in the working copy and commit the entire restructure as a single revision.

Here's the C# code I used to do the moving. Requires SharpSvn library.

using System;
using System.Collections;
using System.Collections.Generic;
using System.Collections.ObjectModel;
using System.IO;
using System.Linq;
using System.Text;
using SharpSvn;

/**
 * 
 * Program operation:
 * 1. Parse command line to determine path to working copy root
 * 2. Enumerate folders in the /trunk 
 * 3. Restructure each project folder in /trunk
 * 
 * 
 * Restructure a Project:
 * 1. Get the project name (folder name in /trunk/{Project})
 * 2. SVN Move /trunk/{Project} to /{Project}/trunk
 * 3. Reparent Project, branches
 * 4. Reparent Project, tags
 * 
 * Reparent(project, folder)
 * If /{folder}/{Project} exists
 *   SVN Move /{folder}/{Project} to /{Project}/{Folder}
 * else
 *   Create folder /{Project}/{Folder}
 *   SVN Add /{Project}/{Folder}
 * 
 **/

namespace TiGra.SvnRestructure
{
    /// <summary>
    /// Restructures a Subversion repository from
    ///     /trunk|branches|tags/Project
    /// to
    ///     /Project/trunk|branches|tags
    /// </summary>
    internal class Program
    {
        private static string WorkingCopy;
        private static string SvnUri;
        private static string Branches;
        private static string Tags;
        private static string Trunk;

        private static SvnClient svn;
        private static List<string> Projects;

        private static void Main(string[] args)
        {
            ProcessCommandLine(args);
            CreateSvnClient();
            EnumerateProjectsInTrunk();
            RestructureProjects();
            Console.ReadLine();
        }

        private static void RestructureProjects()
        {
            foreach (var project in Projects)
            {
                RestructureSingleProject(project);
            }
        }

        private static void RestructureSingleProject(string projectPath)
        {
            var projectName = Path.GetFileName(projectPath);
            var projectNewRoot = Path.Combine(WorkingCopy, projectName);
            bool hasBranches = Directory.Exists(Path.Combine(Branches, projectName));
            bool hasTags = Directory.Exists(Path.Combine(Tags, projectName));
            Reparent(Path.Combine(Trunk, projectName), Path.Combine(projectNewRoot, "trunk"));
            if (hasBranches)
                Reparent(Path.Combine(Branches, projectName), Path.Combine(projectNewRoot, "branches"));
            if (hasTags)
                Reparent(Path.Combine(Tags, projectName), Path.Combine(projectNewRoot, "tags"));
        }

        private static void Reparent(string oldPath, string newPath)
        {
            Console.WriteLine(string.Format("Moving {0} --> {1}", oldPath, newPath));
            svn.Move(oldPath, newPath, new SvnMoveArgs(){CreateParents = true});
        }

        private static void EnumerateProjectsInTrunk()
        {
            var list = EnumerateFolders("trunk");
            Projects = list;
        }

        /// <summary>
        /// Enumerates the folders in the specified subdirectory.
        /// </summary>
        /// <param name="trunk">The trunk.</param>
        private static List<string> EnumerateFolders(string root)
        {
            var fullPath = Path.Combine(WorkingCopy, root);
            var folders = Directory.GetDirectories(fullPath, "*.*", SearchOption.TopDirectoryOnly).ToList();
            folders.RemoveAll(s => s.EndsWith(".svn")); // Remove special metadata folders.
            return folders;
        }

        private static void CreateSvnClient()
        {
            svn = new SharpSvn.SvnClient();
        }

        /// <summary>
        /// Processes the command line. There should be exactly one argument,
        /// which is the path to the working copy.
        /// </summary>
        private static void ProcessCommandLine(string[] args)
        {
            if (args.Length != 1)
                throw new ArgumentException("There must be exactly one argument");
            var path = args[0];
            if (!Directory.Exists(path))
                throw new ArgumentException("The specified working copy root could not be found.");
            WorkingCopy = path;
            Branches = Path.Combine(WorkingCopy, "branches");
            Tags = Path.Combine(WorkingCopy, "tags");
            Trunk = Path.Combine(WorkingCopy, "trunk");
        }
    }
}
share|improve this answer
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.