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What is the rationale behind the advocated use of the for i in xrange(...)-style looping constructs in Python? For simple integer looping, the difference in overheads is substantial. I conducted a simple test using two pieces of code:

File idiomatic.py:

#!/usr/bin/env python

M = 10000
N = 10000

if __name__ == "__main__":
    x, y = 0, 0
    for x in xrange(N):
        for y in xrange(M):
            pass

File cstyle.py:

#!/usr/bin/env python

M = 10000
N = 10000

if __name__ == "__main__":
    x, y = 0, 0
    while x < N:
        while y < M:
            y += 1
        x += 1

Profiling results were as follows:

bash-3.1$ time python cstyle.py

real    0m0.109s
user    0m0.015s
sys     0m0.000s

bash-3.1$ time python idiomatic.py

real    0m4.492s
user    0m0.000s
sys     0m0.031s

I can understand why the Pythonic version is slower -- I imagine it has a lot to do with calling xrange N times, perhaps this could be eliminated if there was a way to rewind a generator. However, with this deal of difference in execution time, why would one prefer to use the Pythonic version?

Edit: I conducted the tests again using the code Mr. Martelli provided, and the results were indeed better now:

I thought I'd enumerate the conclusions from the thread here:

1) Lots of code at the module scope is a bad idea, even if the code is enclosed in an if __name__ == "__main__": block.

2) *Curiously enough, modifying the code that belonged to thebadone to my incorrect version (letting y grow without resetting) produced little difference in performance, even for larger values of M and N.

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2  
Your timing is flawed, I think. Run multiple trials, and perhaps have some computation actually performed inside it to get rid of any possible optimization out of the loop –  Yuliy Apr 10 '10 at 1:21
    
+1 Very interesting question. After reading Martinelli's answer, this question is yet more interesting to me, because it shows the subtle differences between invoking a piece of code inside and outside a function. –  OscarRyz Apr 10 '10 at 2:10
1  
-1: Since the basis for the question was fundamentally incorrect code, would you please close the question. –  S.Lott Apr 10 '10 at 2:45
    
One rationale is that you're more likely to create correct code using the pythonic way. Which you've proved :) –  user97370 Apr 10 '10 at 10:58
    
When you see real time that's inconsistent with user time + sys time, it usually means your benchmark is flawed, and something else was consuming machine resources while you tried to run your code. –  jemfinch Apr 11 '10 at 6:10

5 Answers 5

up vote 22 down vote accepted

Here's the proper comparison, e.g. in loop.py:

M = 10000
N = 10000

def thegoodone():
   for x in xrange(N):
       for y in xrange(M):
           pass

def thebadone():
    x = 0
    while x < N:
        y = 0
        while y < M:
            y += 1
        x += 1

All substantial code should always be in functions -- putting a hundred million loops at a module's top level shows reckless disregard for performance and makes a mockery of any attempts at measuring said performance.

Once you've done that, you see:

$ python -mtimeit -s'import loop' 'loop.thegoodone()'
10 loops, best of 3: 3.45 sec per loop
$ python -mtimeit -s'import loop' 'loop.thebadone()'
10 loops, best of 3: 10.6 sec per loop

So, properly measured, the bad way that you advocate is about 3 times slower than the good way which Python promotes. I hope this makes you reconsider your erroneous advocacy.

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4  
"All substantial code should always be in functions - putting a hundred million loops at a module's top level shows reckless disregard for performance" (I see.) Could you explain why? –  Federico A. Ramponi Apr 10 '10 at 1:52
6  
@Federico, speed. Variable get and set is highly optimized in functions, but can't possibly be at module top-level. E.g., assuming that my laptop and Glenn's machine are equivalent, from our numbers you see a factor of 2 difference for doing things the proper way (all substantial code in functions) vs the totally wrong way (substantial code at module top level). Benchmark it yourself!-) –  Alex Martelli Apr 10 '10 at 1:57
1  
I just did. At module level: 14.3s vs. 36.0s. Local to function: 8.6s vs. 18.5s. (!!) I didn't know, thank you. –  Federico A. Ramponi Apr 10 '10 at 2:06
1  
+1 I can't blame susmits, after all who whould know that code inside functions would run that different compared as running outside of a function. Reading your answer makes completely sense, because after all, code "floating around" the file is module code and this is not evident when someone is new to the language ( as my self ). Sometimes is easy to think about python as a supercharged bash :-S which, obviously as shown here, it is not. :) –  OscarRyz Apr 10 '10 at 2:13
4  
@007brendan, module-level variables are visible from outside the module (i.e., other modules), so every single little change applied to them must be immediately applied, every fetch must be done afresh from the module's dict, unless you can prove otherwise with 100% certainty... which, given threading, is just impossible. Function-local variables are not visible (much less alterable) outside that function instance, which empowers all kinds of optimizations in any semi-decent Python implementation. –  Alex Martelli Apr 10 '10 at 3:55

You forgot to reset y to 0 after the inner loop.

#!/usr/bin/env python
M = 10000
N = 10000

if __name__ == "__main__":
    x, y = 0, 0
    while x < N:
        while y < M:
            y += 1
        x += 1
        y = 0

ed: 20.63s after fix vs. 6.97s using xrange

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I was about to answer similarly. My corrected while-loop code ran about 3 times slower than the for-loop code. –  Darius Bacon Apr 10 '10 at 1:22
1  
In all seriousness, no. Language idioms always have to take reasonable performance into account; if the xrange idiom really was 40 times slower, it would be a flawed idiom that should either be fixed or no longer used. Readability is important, very often even at the expense of some performance--but not that much. –  Glenn Maynard Apr 10 '10 at 1:27
    
OK deleted my answer anyway... –  Felix Kling Apr 10 '10 at 1:30
1  
Besides the performance, this error in the question is an excellent demonstration why high level loops are preferred! –  Piotr Lesnicki Apr 10 '10 at 2:19

good for iterating over data structures

The for i in ... syntax is great for iterating over data structures. In a lower-level language, you would generally be iterating over an array indexed by an int, but with the python syntax you can eliminate the indexing step.

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this is not a direct answer to the question, but i want to open the dialog a bit more on xrange(). two things:

A. there is something wrong with one of the OP statements that no one has corrected yet (yes, in addition to the bug in the code of not resetting y):

"I imagine it has a lot to do with calling xrange N times...."

unlike traditional counting for loops, Python's is more like a shell's foreach... looping over an iterable. therefore, xrange() is called exactly once, not "N times."

B. xrange() is the name of this function in Python 2. it replaces and is renamed to range() in Python 3, so keep this in mind when porting. if you didn't know already, xrange() returns an iterator(-like object) while range() returns lists. since the latter is more inefficient, it has been deprecated in favor of xrange() which is more memory-friendly. the workaround in Python 3, for all those who need to have a list is list(range(N)).

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I thought that each time the inner loop finished all its iterations, an xrange(M) object was defined again, because AFAIK, generators could not be rewound. –  susmits Apr 11 '10 at 3:24

I've repeated the test from @Alex Martelli's answer. The idiomatic for loop is 5 times faster than the while loop:

python -mtimeit -s'from while_vs_for import while_loop as loop' 'loop(10000)'
10 loops, best of 3: 9.6 sec per loop
python -mtimeit -s'from while_vs_for import for_loop as loop'   'loop(10000)'
10 loops, best of 3: 1.83 sec per loop

while_vs_for.py:

def while_loop(N):
    x = 0
    while x < N:
        y = 0
        while y < N:
            pass
            y += 1
        x += 1

def for_loop(N):
    for x in xrange(N):
        for y in xrange(N):
            pass

At module level:

$ time -p python for.py
real 4.38
user 4.37
sys 0.01
$ time -p python while.py
real 14.28
user 14.28
sys 0.01
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