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I'd like to be able to use template deduction to achieve the following:

GCPtr<A> ptr1 = GC::Allocate();
GCPtr<B> ptr2 = GC::Allocate();

instead of (what I currently have):

GCPtr<A> ptr1 = GC::Allocate<A>();
GCPtr<B> ptr2 = GC::Allocate<B>();

My current Allocate function looks like this:

class GC
{
public:
    template <typename T>
    static GCPtr<T> Allocate();
};

Would this be possible to knock off the extra < A> and < B>?

Thanks

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6 Answers 6

up vote 21 down vote accepted

That cannot be done. The return type does not take part in type deduction, it is rather a result of having already matched the appropriate template signature. You can, nevertheless, hide it from most uses as:

// helper
template <typename T>
void Allocate( GCPtr<T>& p ) {
   p = GC::Allocate<T>();
}

int main()
{
   GCPtr<A> p = 0;
   Allocate(p);
}

Whether that syntax is actually any better or worse than the initial GCPtr<A> p = GC::Allocate<A>() is another question.

P.S. c++11 will allow you to skip one of the type declarations:

auto p = GC::Allocate<A>();   // p is of type GCPtr<A>
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The only thing I can think of: make Allocate a non-template that returns a non-template proxy object that has a templated conversion operator which does the real work:

template <class T>
struct GCPtr
{

};

class Allocator
{
public:
    template <class T>
    operator GCPtr<T>() { return GCPtr<T>(); }
};

class GC
{
public:
    static Allocator Allocate() { return Allocator(); }//could give a call-back pointer?
};

int main()
{
    GCPtr<int> p = GC::Allocate();
}
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2  
It seems overkill, but still, I did not know this pattern. You taught me something. So +1. –  paercebal Apr 10 '10 at 10:40
    
Anyway, at first glance, I guess you could avoid the GC::Allocate() altogether and write : GCPtr<int> p = Allocator() ; , no ? –  paercebal Apr 10 '10 at 10:55
1  
As the comment says, the Allocator object could store additional data that it receives through the constructor, so GC::Allocate can decide what data it needs for the operation. - Eventually the constructor of GCPtr<T> could do the work itself (invoke GC::Allocate<T>). –  UncleBens Apr 10 '10 at 10:58

You could go the opposite route.

If you're using an up to date compiler (MSVC 2010 which should be out in a couple of days, or the current version of GCC) and don't mind relying on C++0x features:

auto ptr1 = GC::Allocate<A>();
auto ptr2 = GC::Allocate<B>();

would save you the extra <A> and <B>, just not on the right hand side. :)

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In the same way you can't overload functions on return type, you can't do template deduction on it. And for the same reason - if f() is a template/overload that returns something, what type to use here:

f();
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1  
Well I've thought about that already. My garbage collector class uses reference counting, and calling GC::Allocate() will inherently have 0 references which would just get cleaned up anyway. This is of course if the code compiled/ –  Marlon Apr 10 '10 at 10:23
2  
Compiler error, unless appearing in a cast ((int)f();) ...? –  UncleBens Apr 10 '10 at 10:24
    
@UncleBens: nice idea! However, the C++ compiler doesn't currently work this way. –  Vlad Apr 10 '10 at 10:29
2  
@Marlon I think you have commented on the wrong answer. –  anon Apr 10 '10 at 10:29
    
@UncleBens Say what???? –  anon Apr 10 '10 at 10:29

(This answer is the same as @UncleBens, but a bit more general as it perfect-forward any arguments.)

This is very useful in languages like haskell where, for example, read will take a string as input and will parse it according to the desired return type.

(Here is sample code on ideone.)

First, start with the function foo whose return type we wish to deduce:

template<typename Ret>
Ret foo(const char *,int);
template<>
std::string foo<std::string>(const char *s,int) { return s; }
template<>
int         foo<int        >(const char *,int i) { return i; }

When asked for a string, it'll return the string that's in its first argument. When asked for an int, it'll return the second argument.

We can define a function auto_foo that can be used as follows:

int main() {
        std::string s = auto_foo("hi",5); std::cout << s << std::endl;
        int         i = auto_foo("hi",5); std::cout << i << std::endl;
}

To make this work, we need an object that will temporarily store the function arguments, and also run the function when it is asked to convert to the desired return type:

#include<tuple>

template<size_t num_args, typename ...T>
class Foo;
template<typename ...T>
class Foo<2,T...> : public std::tuple<T&&...>
{
public: 
        Foo(T&&... args) :
                std::tuple<T&&...>(std::forward<T>(args)...)
        {}
        template< typename Return >
        operator Return() { return foo<Return>(std::get<0>(*this), std::get<1>(*this)); }
};
template<typename ...T>
class Foo<3,T...> : std::tuple<T&&...>
{
public: 
        Foo(T&&... args) :
                std::tuple<T&&...>(std::forward<T>(args)...)
        {}
        template< typename Return >
        operator Return() { return foo<Return>(std::get<0>(*this), std::get<1>(*this), std::get<2>(*this)); }
};

template<typename ...T>
auto
auto_foo(T&&... args)
        // -> Foo<T&&...> // old, incorrect, code
        -> Foo< sizeof...(T), T&&...> // to count the arguments
{
        return              {std::forward<T>(args)...};
}

Also, the above works for two-arg or three-arg functions, it's not difficult to see how to extend that.

This is a lot of code to write! For each function you will to apply this to, you could write a macro that does this for you. Something like this at the top of your file:

REGISTER_FUNCTION_FOR_DEDUCED_RETURN_TYPE(foo); // declares
                        // necessary structure and auto_???

and then you could use auto_foo in your program.

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I find it quite interesting, but I believe you are missing the specialization parameter in auto_foo : auto auto_foo(T&&... args) -> Foo<sizeof...(T), T&&...>, because otherwise it won't select the specialization IMHO. –  daminetreg May 19 at 8:21
    
You're right. I'll update the code here. I had tested the code on my computer, but obviously I didn't copy it exactly. Thanks! –  Aaron McDaid May 19 at 12:57
    
In any case it's a nice way to implement this. Thanks for the example. –  daminetreg May 20 at 7:16
    
Interesting solution, is there a reason why you've choosen std::tuple_size instead of directly using sizeof...(T) ? –  daminetreg May 23 at 5:38
    
No reason, @daminetreg . I've changed it now. I had simply copied and pasted it from my working example, and I don't know how I wrote it that way in the first place! (Update: I may have tried sizeof(T)... first, thinking that ... always goes on the end of the expression in which expansion should occur. But that doesn't work that way, so perhaps that's why I went for tuple_size instead) –  Aaron McDaid May 27 at 14:59

You could try to use a macro for it. Other than that, I don't see how that's supposed to work with just one statement.

#define ALLOC(ptrname,type) GCPtr<type> ptrname = GC::Allocate<type>()

ALLOC(ptr1,A);

Johannes' points are valid. The >> issue is easily fixed. But I think having commas as part of the type requires the C99 preprocessor varargs extension:

#define ALLOC(ptrname,...) GCPtr< __VA_ARGS__ > ptrname = GC::Allocate< __VA_ARGS__ >()

ALLOC(ptr1,SomeTemplate<int,short>);
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1  
Notice that this macro fails if you do ALLOC(ptr1, A<a, b>); (there are two problems: No space after type (aka' >>) and the comma makes two macro arguments out of A<a, b>). –  Johannes Schaub - litb Apr 10 '10 at 10:43
    
And what would that buy you? You'd still have to mention the type, and it's less safe than David's solution with an inlined function template. -1 from me. –  sbi Apr 10 '10 at 11:00
    
You can solve both problems by saying ALLOC(ptr1, (A<a, b>)); and rewriting the macro to pass a function-type to template<typename T> struct ty; template<typename Ty> struct ty<void(Ty)> { typedef Ty type; }; and say GCPtr<ty<void type>::type> ptrname instead (and the same with typename for use within templates. C++0x and some current c++03 compilers allows typename also outside of templates, though). –  Johannes Schaub - litb Apr 10 '10 at 11:00
    
@sbi: Sure, I wouldn't use such a macro in my code. That that was the only thing that came to my mind. And of course you have to name the type at least once even with Davids solution. –  sellibitze Apr 10 '10 at 11:05
    
@ltb: that's mighty clever to work around C99 varargs macros. But it does have the problem that you need two versions if the type depends on template arguments. –  sellibitze Apr 10 '10 at 11:08

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