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How can I programmatically (i.e., not using e.g. vi) convert DOS/Windows newlines to Unix?

The dos2unix and unix2dos commands are not available on certain systems, how can I emulate these with commands like sed/awk/tr?

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10 Answers 10

You can use tr to convert from DOS to Unix, you can only do this safely if CR appears in your file only as the first byte of a CRLF byte pair. This is usually the case. You then use:

tr -d '\015' <DOS-file >UNIX-file

Note that the name DOS-file is different from the name UNIX-file; if you try to use the same name twice, you will end up with no data in the file.

You can't do it the other way round (with standard 'tr').

If you know how to enter carriage return into a script (control-V, control-M to enter control-M), then:

sed 's/^M$//'     # DOS to Unix
sed 's/$/^M/'     # Unix to DOS

where the '^M' is the control-M character. You can also use the bash ANSI-C Quoting mechanism to specify the carriage return:

sed $'s/\r$//'     # DOS to Unix
sed $'s/$/\r/'     # Unix to DOS

Question: why can't you get dos2unix and unix2dos installed (or dtou and utod)? Or is this a restriction imposed by the person setting homework?

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using tr -d '\015' <DOS-file >UNIX-file where DOS-file == UNIX-file just results in an empty file. The output file has to be a different file, unfortunately. –  Buttle Butkus Nov 15 '13 at 1:50
1  
@ButtleButkus: Well, yes; that's why I used two different names. If you zap the input file before the program reads it all, as you do when you use the same name twice, you end up with an empty file. That is uniform behaviour on Unix-like systems. It requires special code to handle overwriting an input file safely. Follow the instructions and you will be OK. –  Jonathan Leffler Nov 15 '13 at 1:56
    
I seem to remember in-file search-replace functionality somehwere. –  Buttle Butkus Nov 15 '13 at 2:08
2  
There are places; you have to know where to find them. Within limits, the GNU sed option -i (for in-place) works; the limits are linked files and symlinks. The sort command has 'always' (since 1979, if not earlier) supported the -o option which can list one of the input files. However, that is in part because sort must read all its input before it can write any of its output. Other programs sporadically support overwriting one of their input files. You can find a general purpose program (script) to avoid problems in 'The UNIX Programming Environment' by Kernighan & Pike. –  Jonathan Leffler Nov 15 '13 at 2:14

This problem can be solved with standard tools, but there are sufficiently many traps for the unwary that I recommend you install the flip command, which was written over 20 years ago by Rahul Dhesi, the author of zoo. It does an excellent job converting file formats while, for example, avoiding the inadvertant destruction of binary files, which is a little too easy if you just race around altering every CRLF you see...

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Any way to do this in a streaming fashion, without modifying the original file? –  augurar Dec 7 '13 at 22:08
tr -d "\r" < file

take a look here for examples using sed:

# IN UNIX ENVIRONMENT: convert DOS newlines (CR/LF) to Unix format.
sed 's/.$//'               # assumes that all lines end with CR/LF
sed 's/^M$//'              # in bash/tcsh, press Ctrl-V then Ctrl-M
sed 's/\x0D$//'            # works on ssed, gsed 3.02.80 or higher

# IN UNIX ENVIRONMENT: convert Unix newlines (LF) to DOS format.
sed "s/$/`echo -e \\\r`/"            # command line under ksh
sed 's/$'"/`echo \\\r`/"             # command line under bash
sed "s/$/`echo \\\r`/"               # command line under zsh
sed 's/$/\r/'                        # gsed 3.02.80 or higher

Use sed -i for in-place conversion e.g. sed -i 's/..../' file.

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6  
I used a variant since my file only had \r : tr "\r" "\n" < infile > outfile –  Matt Todd Nov 19 '10 at 0:29
    
@MattTodd could you post this as an answer? the -d is featured more frequently and will not help in the "only \r" situation. –  naxa Oct 14 '13 at 15:20
    
Note that the proposed \r to \n mapping has the effect of double-spacing the files; each single CRLF line ending in DOS becomes \n\n in Unix. –  Jonathan Leffler Apr 30 at 13:58

The solutions posted so far only deal with part of the problem, converting DOS/Windows' CRLF into Unix's LF; the part they're missing is that DOS use CRLF as a line separator, while Unix uses LF as a line terminator. The difference is that a DOS file (usually) won't have anything after the last line in the file, while Unix will. To do the conversion properly, you need to add that final LF (unless the file is zero-length, i.e. has no lines in it at all). My favorite incantation for this (with a little added logic to handle Mac-style CR-separated files, and not molest files that're already in unix format) is a bit of perl:

perl -pe 'if ( s/\r\n?/\n/g ) { $f=1 }; if ( $f || ! $m ) { s/([^\n])\z/$1\n/ }; $m=1' PCfile.txt

Note that this sends the Unixified version of the file to stdout. If you want to replace the file with a Unixified version, add perl's -i flag.

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Using AWK you can do:

awk '{ sub("\r$", ""); print }' dos.txt > unix.txt

Using Perl you can do:

perl -pe 's/\r$//' < dos.txt > unix.txt
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this worked for me :P –  holms Feb 12 '13 at 9:14

If you don't have access to dos2unix, but can read this page, then you can copy/paste dos2unix.py from here.

#!/usr/bin/env python
"""\
convert dos linefeeds (crlf) to unix (lf)
usage: dos2unix.py <input> <output>
"""
import sys

if len(sys.argv[1:]) != 2:
  sys.exit(__doc__)

content = ''
outsize = 0
with open(sys.argv[1], 'rb') as infile:
  content = infile.read()
with open(sys.argv[2], 'wb') as output:
  for line in content.splitlines():
    outsize += len(line) + 1
    output.write(line + '\n')

print("Done. Saved %s bytes." % (len(content)-outsize))

Cross-posted from superuser.

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sed can do in place conversion

sed -i 's/\r//' CRLF.txt

More info

-i    edit files in place 

Useful one-line scripts for sed

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Maybe something like

cat FILE | tr '\n\r' '\n' > FILE
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4  
Will > FILE not wipe the contents of the FILE ? –  codaddict Apr 10 '10 at 15:12
    
@unicornaddict: yes, 'cat FILE | tr ... > FILE' will wipe FILE. This only covers DOS to UNIX, too, not vice versa. –  Jonathan Leffler Apr 10 '10 at 15:15
3  
This is a useless use of cat where tr "\r\n" "\n" < infile > outfile works the same (but more efficiently). –  newfurniturey Apr 25 '13 at 4:55

I tried sed 's/^M$//' file.txt on OSX as well as several other methods (http://www.thingy-ma-jig.co.uk/blog/25-11-2010/fixing-dos-line-endings or http://hintsforums.macworld.com/archive/index.php/t-125.html). None worked, the file remained unchanged (btw Ctrl-v Enter was needed to reproduce ^M). In the end I used TextWrangler. Its not strictly command line but it works and it doesn't complain.

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For Mac osx if you have homebrew installed [http://brew.sh/][1]

brew install dos2unix

for csv in *.csv; do dos2unix -c mac ${csv}; done;

Make sure you have made copies of the files, as this command will modify the files in place. The -c mac option makes the switch to be compatible with osx.

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