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I am trying to create a UserDon object, and trying to generate the get and set methods programmatically ( based on Pro Javascript book by John Resig page 37 ), and am testing this on Firefox 3.5

The problem is: in function UserDon, "this" refers to the window object instead of the UserDon object.

So after calling var userdon = new UserDon(...) I got setname and getname methods created on the window object (also setage and getage).

How can I fix this?

function UserDon( properties ) {
   for( var i in properties ) {
   (function(){
      this[ "get" + i ] = function() {
        return properties[i];
      };

      this[ "set" + i ] = function(val) {
        properties[i] = val;
      };
      })();
   }
 }

var userdon = new UserDon( {
   name: "Bob",
   age: 44
});
share|improve this question
1  
Good question if this is an exercise. Otherwise, if you're not doing any additional operations in the getters/setters, you'd hopefully simply use public properties and forgo the method overhead. :) –  deceze Apr 11 '10 at 4:52

4 Answers 4

up vote 6 down vote accepted

The this value you are using belongs to the auto-invoking function expression you have inside the loop, and when you invoke a function in this way, this will always refer to the global object.

Edit: I missed the fact that the function expression is trying to make variable capturing to handle the getter/setter creation inside the loop, but the looping variable i, needs to be passed as an argument in order to do it and since the function expression is there, context (the outer this) should be preserved:

function UserDon( properties ) {
  var instance = this; // <-- store reference to instance

  for( var i in properties ) { 
    (function (i) { // <-- capture looping variable
      instance[ "get" + i ] = function() {
        return properties[i];
      };

      instance[ "set" + i ] = function(val) {
        properties[i] = val;
      };
    })(i); // <-- pass the variable
  }
}

var userdon = new UserDon( {
   name: "Bob",
   age: 44
});

userdon.getname(); // "Bob"
userdon.getage();  // 44

You can also use the call method to invoke the function expression, preserving the context (the value of this) and introducing the looping variable to the new scope in a single step:

function UserDon( properties ) {
  for( var i in properties ) { 
    (function (i) { // <-- looping variable introduced
      this[ "get" + i ] = function() {
        return properties[i];
      };

      this[ "set" + i ] = function(val) {
        properties[i] = val;
      };
    }).call(this, i); // <-- preserve context and capture variable
  }
}

I would also recommend to use an if (properties.hasOwnProperty(i)) { ... } inside the for...in loop to avoid iterating over user extended properties inherited from Object.prototype.

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1  
Without the auto-invoking function, both getname() and getage() will return 44, because closure references the last value of the array, which is age, refer to page 29 of the book. –  portoalet Apr 11 '10 at 8:04
    
@portoalet: You are right I missed that point, but that is not enough, the i variable should be passed as an argument to that function, also the this value should be preserved, see my edit. –  CMS Apr 11 '10 at 8:25
    
Thanks, it now works perfectly. –  portoalet Apr 11 '10 at 8:41

It could be a better idea to get a generic function with 2 parameters : the name of the property and the value (or only the name for the getter). And this function would check the presence of a speial function for this property and if there isn't any, it would juste change the property's value (or return it's value for getter).

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Here is how I would code it:-

function UserDon( properties ) {
   var self = this;
   for( var i in properties ) {
   (function(prop){
      self[ "get" + prop ] = function() {
        return properties[prop];
      };

      self[ "set" + prop ] = function(val) {
        properties[prop] = val;
      };
      })(i);
   }
 }
share|improve this answer

You can also use the lesser-known
__defineGetter__("varName", function(){});
and __defineSetter__("varName", function(val){});

Although they are nonstandard [like x-html-replace content-type] they are supported by a majority of the non-ie browsers out there [chrome, firefox]

Syntax would be:

benjamin = new object();
benjamin.__defineGetter__("age", function(){
  return 21;
});

Or you can approach this with prototyping

benjamin = {
  get age()
  {
    return 21;
  }
}
share|improve this answer
    
never saw this before. Are you using this yourself? –  portoalet Apr 12 '10 at 11:57
1  
I only use it for debugging where a variable is being get/set-ed. You defineSetter("variableName", outputStackTrace); and it works with css styles as well. For example, you say object.style.__defineGetter__("left", outputStackTraceFunction); For some reason people don't know about this function. Probably because its nonstandard? –  Warty Apr 12 '10 at 20:26

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