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What is faster and/or generally better?

vector<myType> myVec;
int i;
myType current;

for( i = 0; i < 1000000; i ++ )
{
 current = myVec[ i ];
 doSomethingWith( current );
 doAlotMoreWith( current );
 messAroundWith( current );
 checkSomeValuesOf( current );
}

or

vector<myType> myVec;
int i;

for( i = 0; i < 1000000; i ++ )
{
 doSomethingWith( myVec[ i ] );
 doAlotMoreWith( myVec[ i ] );
 messAroundWith( myVec[ i ] );
 checkSomeValuesOf( myVec[ i ] );
}

I'm currently using the first solution. There are really millions of calls per second and every single bit comparison/move is performance-problematic.

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13  
Why are you here asking people which is faster when you could instead write a test harness in literally ten minutes that could give you a definitive answer? –  JUST MY correct OPINION Apr 11 '10 at 9:46
3  
I am always surprised when people ask boolean question "which one is faster", instead of "how much faster" (in terms of complexity, CPU cycles or time) –  Pavel Radzivilovsky Apr 11 '10 at 10:09
    
@Pavel: Or "faster under which circumstances" –  jalf Apr 11 '10 at 10:18
    
A personal opinion: I think it's ok for people to ask which is faster, because they might not be as expert in C++ as to decide whether the clock() or time() function would be better (or knowing about the existence of these in the first place). They might also expect advice in the form of compiler optimization. I don't see any issue in helping out... –  Nav Apr 6 '11 at 6:38

4 Answers 4

The first version may be needlessly expensive because it relies on creating a copy of the object in the vector. Unless myType is some very small and simple object, like an int, storing a reference may be a better idea. It should also be declared when you need it, and no earlier, to limit aliasing issues that might otherwise cause the compiler to emit less efficient code:

vector<myType> myVec;
for(int i = 0; i < 1000000; i ++ )
{
 myType& current = myVec[ i ];
 doSomethingWith( current );
 doAlotMoreWith( current );
 messAroundWith( current );
 checkSomeValuesOf( current );
}

One advantage of creating a copy, rather than using a reference, is that it might cause the compiler to load the object into a register, rather than read it from memory on every access. So both versions are worth trying.

Any of course, the copy vs reference advice applies to each of your functions too. Do they take the argument by value or reference? Depending on what they do with it, and how myType is defined, one might be faster than the other.

The second version is flawed because it (unless the compiler is able to optimize it away) requires the object to be looked up in memory every time. Depending on your STL implementation, there may also be a bit of overhead due to bounds checking on operator[].

Creating a temporary first, which is then passed to each of your functions is the right way to go. The question is whether that temporary should be of value type (myType), or reference type (myType&/const myType&)

Another option that may be worth exploring is putting each function call in its own separate loop. That hurts data locality in some ways, but if some of the functions use a lot of local data, it might perform better. It might also play nicer with the instruction cache.

But really, performance is extremely complicated. Caching, out of order execution, the exact semantics of myType (especially its copy constructor and size) and the amount of optimizations performed by the compiler are all unknown to us. So we cannot give you a reliable answer.

Guess who can: your compiler. Write the test. Try both. Time the results. Pick the faster one.

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bruno asks below: "Could anyone explain to me why declaring the variable inside the loop is better than declaring it outside." –  Thomas Apr 11 '10 at 10:43

Besides avoiding multiple access to the same index and using a reference to avoid copying, you could use the fastcall calling convention in your functions. It instructs the compiler to pass parameters in registers, when possible, instead of pushing them to the stack.

However, the fastcall isn't standardized, so it's vendor specific.

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Depends what the assignment operator for your type gets up to. And you are passing by reference to those functions, I hope? But as for all performance questions, if it is important to you, test your specific case yourself.

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In terms of formatting, I would suggest the following (declare at point of initialization, use const myType&):

vector myVec;
for(int i = 0; i < 1000000; i++){
 const myType& current = myVec[i];
 doSomethingWith(current);
 doAlotMoreWith(current);
 messAroundWith(current);
 checkSomeValuesOf(current);
}

However, in terms of your original question, using a temporary variable named current is going to be at least as fast as using myVec[i] each time. It is possible, though, that an optimizing compiler will remove redundant lookups to myVec (i.e. using your solution of assignment to a temporary)... in general, if you call a a member function declared "const" repeatedly without using any non-const member function, the compiler is free to create a temporary and perform the call only once, saving the result to a local temporary.

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