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Below program contains two show() functions in parent and child classes, but first show() function takes FLOAT argument and second show() function takes INT argument.

.If I call show(10.1234) function by passing float argument, it should call class A's show(float a) function , but it calls class B's show(int b).

#include<iostream>
using namespace std;

class A{
        float a;
public:
        void show(float a)
        {
                this->a = a;
                cout<<"\n A's show() function called : "<<this->a<<endl;
        }
};

class B : public A{
        int b;
public:
        void show(int b)
        {
                this->b = b;
                cout<<"\n B's show() function called : "<<this->b<<endl;
        }
};

int main()
{
        float i=10.1234;
        B Bobject;
        Bobject.show((float) i);
        return 0;
}

Output:

B's show() function called : 10

Expected output:

A's show() function called : 10.1234

Why g++ compiler chosen wrong show() function i.e class B's show(int b) function ?

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1  
You should rephrase the question for something in the lines of: compile time overload resolution or the like... Compile time polymorphism is usually interpreted as using templates to achieve something similar to polymorphism at compile time. –  David Rodríguez - dribeas Apr 11 '10 at 17:02

5 Answers 5

up vote 12 down vote accepted

If you have a function in a derived class that has the same name as a function in the base class, it hides all of the functions in the base class. You either need to rename your function, or use a using declaration in your derived class:

using A::show;

or, you can explicitly call the base class function:

Bobject.A::show(i);
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+1 - i didn't know about the using directive to unhide hidden functions. yay. –  Chris Becke Apr 11 '10 at 14:19
2  
@Chris: using directive is what imports a namespace. Different thing. –  Potatoswatter Apr 11 '10 at 14:33

When you define a name in a derived class, it hides the name from the base class.

You can achieve what you want by adding this to B's definition:

using A::show;

That will let you use both A's show() and B's show().

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You're mixing things:
If you had 2 functions in class A with the following signatures:
void Show(int a);
void Show(float a);

Then the compiles would have chosen the "correct" function.

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Use a using declaration.

class B : public A{
        int b;
public:
        using A::show;
        …
};
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There is no polymorphism involved here. You should declare your functions virtual to make them polymorphic, and make them have the same signature.

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Some people call function overloading "compile-time polymorphism", although in C++ it usually refers to CRTP. –  Nemanja Trifunovic Apr 11 '10 at 14:09
    
I am using show() function with different sugnaturtes, so Virtual key word not required. If signaturessame, then only we suppose to use Virtual key word. Correect me if I am wrong ? –  siva Apr 11 '10 at 14:20
    
@Nemanja Interesting, never heard of that. Although I see the analogy, IMHO it is imprecise use of the term. Just my 2 cents :-) –  Péter Török Apr 11 '10 at 19:04
    
@siva That's my point. In other words, the title of your post is incorrect. –  Péter Török Apr 11 '10 at 19:05

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